Running Could Add 3 Years to Your Lifespan

Tony:

The study involved more than 55,000 adults aged 18 to 100, who were followed during a 15-year period to determine whether there is a relationship between running and longevity. About one quarter of this group were runners.

Eat less; move more is still the mantra of this blog.

Tony

Originally posted on Cooking with Kathy Man:

Just 5 to 10 minutes a day seems to bring benefits, study says.

Runners may live an average three years longer than people who don’t run, according to new research.

But, the best news from this study is that it appears that you can reap this benefit even if you run at slow speeds for mere minutes every day, the 15-year study suggests.

“People may not need to run a lot to get health benefits,” said lead author Duck-chul Lee, an assistant professor of kinesiology at Iowa State University. “I hope this study can motivate more people to start running and to continue running as an attainable health goal.”

It’s not clear from the study whether the longer lifespan is directly caused by running. The researchers were only able to prove a strong link between running and living longer. There could be other reasons that runners live longer. It could…

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9 Rules Of Smart Snacking

Originally posted on Our Better Health:

BY JEANETTE BRONÉE     JULY 28, 2014

As a health and nutrition consultant, two big questions I’m always asked are: When should I snack? and What should I snack on? Snacking often ends up being more like erratic eating so here are some tips to help you snack smartly:

1. Snack when your hunger is real.

When there is too much time between meals, you might need a bite to hold you over. The stomach takes three to four hours to empty, so if your next meal is five hours away, eat a little. If you under-eat or wait too long, watch out for over-snacking. You don’t want a snack to turn into brunch or dinner.

2. Snack when your blood sugar is low.

How can you tell? If your meals are high in starch or sugar, you might get low blood sugar shortly after eating, a swing that…

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High-Salt Diet Doubles Threat of Cardiovascular Disease in People with Diabetes

Tony:

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 29.1 million Americans have some form of diabetes. This population is at risk for heart disease. Between 2003 and 2006, cardiovascular disease death rates were about 1.7 times higher among adults diagnosed with diabetes than those who were not, according to the CDC’s 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report.

To read further about the impact of salt on our bodies, check out: U.K. Salt Reduction Drives Down Stroke and Heart Disease Deaths, How Much is Too Much Salt? Is It Worth Cutting Salt and Boosting Potassium? Some Sneaky Salt Statistics, Where Does All the Salt in OUr Diet Come From? Count Sodium as Well as Calories at Fast Food Outlets.

Tony

Originally posted on Cooking with Kathy Man:

People with Type 2 diabetes who eat a diet high in salt face twice the risk of developing cardiovascular disease as those who consume less sodium, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM).

Diabetes occurs when there is too much sugar in the bloodstream. People develop Type 2 diabetes when their bodies become resistant to the hormone insulin, which carries sugar from the blood to cells.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, about 29.1 million Americans have some form of diabetes. This population is at risk for heart disease. Between 2003 and 2006, cardiovascular disease death rates were about 1.7 times higher among adults diagnosed with diabetes than those who were not, according to the CDC’s 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report.

“The study’s findings provide clear scientific evidence supporting low-sodium diets to reduce the rate of…

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Slow Walking Speed and Memory Complaints Can Predict Dementia

Tony:

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that up to 5.3 million Americans—about 1 in 9 people age 65 and over—have Alzheimer’s disease, the most common type of dementia. That number is expected to more than double by 2050 due to population aging.

To read further, check out my page Important Facts About Your Brain – and Exercise.

Tony

Originally posted on Cooking with Kathy Man:

A study involving nearly 27,000 older adults on five continents found that nearly 1 in 10 met criteria for pre-dementia based on a simple test that measures how fast people walk and whether they have cognitive complaints. People who tested positive for pre-dementia were twice as likely as others to develop dementia within 12 years. The study, led by scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University and Montefiore Medical Center, was published online on July 16, 2014 in Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

The new test diagnoses motoric cognitive risk syndrome (MCR). Testing for the newly described syndrome relies on measuring gait speed (our manner of walking) and asking a few simple questions about a patient’s cognitive abilities, both of which take just seconds. The test is not reliant on the latest medical technology and can be done in a clinical setting…

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7 Food Rules Anyone Can Live By

Tony:

If you can’t answer that question, nobody can help you make better nutrition choices. How you track or journal is up to you. The best method is the one you actually do!

Originally posted on Our Better Health:

BY ASHLEY KOFF     JULY 21, 2014 

As a registered dietician, every time I begin a talk or a client session with “better nutrition is actually simple” I get looks that range from incredulous, to hopeful, to (frankly) pissed off. Because if there’s one thing most people agree on today, it’s that nutrition — what to really eat, drink, and pop to achieve your personal health goals — is confusing.

It seems to change every day and so dramatically that I’ve actually coined the phrase “nutrition whiplash” to describe the feeling of flipping through channels or pages or aisles in the store and are told the same food or ingredient is at one moment “super” and “disease preventing” and then later, “bad for you” or even “toxic.”

Well, while I can’t control the media or the marketing, I can toss you a life preserver to help you ride the…

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How to Practice Weight Control at Cookouts

It isn’t easy. After all, the half the fun of a cookout is seeing the meat being grilled outside.

But WebMD has some words of wisdom regarding that grill full of goodies. “A 20 ounce T-bone steak can weigh in at 1,540 calories and 124 g fat.  An average cheeseburger has 750 calories and 45 grams of fat. What about pork or beef ribs? They come from the fattiest part of the animal.”

barbecue-ribs8-1

Remember, the average adult needs about 2200 calories to maintain body weight. Being careless at a cookout can put you way over budget as far as calories are concerned. Or, should I say, weigh over budget?

WebMD suggests going lean with cuts like pork tenderloin, skinless chicken breast and lean ground beef. If you can get these onto the grill without insulting your host, you are home free. If not, you need to be careful and cut way back when it comes to plate-filling. Those calorie bombs go down easy, but take hours of sweat to burn off. We all know the cliche Seconds on the lips forever on the hips.

One of the tricks that works well and is more subtle than bringing your own lean meat is to bring a tray of appetizers that includes carrots, celery, etc. You can work on filling up on those munchies so that a smaller portion of the high fat meat will satisfy you.

When the meal winds down to dessert time, beware of the cakes and pies. Once again, you can do an end run here, and bring some healthy pineapple slices or, better yet, watermelon. Everyone loves watermelon and it is minimal in calories. Watermelon happens to be one of my favorite foods. Check out How Healthy is Watermelon? to read further about how healthy it is.

There are few treats more refreshing than watermelon on a summer day.

There are few treats more refreshing than watermelon on a summer day.

The old saying an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure applies here. Paying attention to serving size and exercising portion control can keep you on the safe side. If you don’t overdo the eating and drinking, you won’t have to worry about extra exercise to work it off.

Focus on lean eating and conversation and avoid at all costs mindless munching.

Tony

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10 reasons to eat sourdough bread

Originally posted on Our Better Health:

A Healthy Bread That is Good For You!

by Halle Cottis 

There is so much debate out there on whether or not we should be consuming grains.  I agree, that modernized grains are most likely not good for you.  Most of them are made from genetically modified grains and can damage your health.  For the past year or so, I have eliminated grains from my diet…I needed the break.  I have slowly started to reintroduce grains back to my diet.  I have chosen to focus on the traditional preparations of grains so that my body can break down the grains and digest them more easily.

What is sourdough?  According to the Bread Bakers Forum,   Sourdough is an American term for a natural leaven of “wild” or natural yeast and lactobacilli.  Also the process of leavening bread with a natural leaven.  Do not mistaken this with todays modernized yeast, it…

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8 Ways Zinc Affects the Human Body

Originally posted on Cooking with Kathy Man:

Researchers identified zinc as one of the most important essential trace metals in human nutrition and lifestyle in a new review article in Comprehensive Reviews in Food Science and Food Safety, published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT). Zinc is not only a vital element in various physiological processes; it is also a drug in the prevention of many diseases.

The adult body contains about two to three grams of zinc. It is found in organs, tissues, bones, fluids, and cells. Foods with high protein content, specifically animal protein, are major sources of zinc in the human diet. Zinc can also be used as fortification for other foods as well. Nearly half of the world’s population is at risk for inadequate zinc intake. The article reviewed numerous studies that showed a relationship between zinc and vital human physiological processes such as the following:

Brain: The blood zinc level is…

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Eating Probiotics Regularly May Improve Your Blood Pressure

Tony:

“We believe probiotics might help lower blood pressure by having other positive effects on health, including improving total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein, or LDL, cholesterol; reducing blood glucose and insulin resistance; and by helping to regulate the hormone system that regulates blood pressure and fluid balance,” Sun said.

Originally posted on Cooking with Kathy Man:

Eating probiotics regularly may modestly improve your blood pressure, according to new research in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension.

Probiotics are live microorganisms (naturally occurring bacteria in the gut) thought to have beneficial effects; common sources are yogurt or dietary supplements.

“The small collection of studies we looked at suggest regular consumption of probiotics can be part of a healthy lifestyle to help reduce high blood pressure, as well as maintain healthy blood pressure levels,” said Jing Sun, Ph.D., lead author and senior lecturer at the Griffith Health Institute and School of Medicine, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia. “This includes probiotics in yogurt, fermented and sour milk and cheese, and probiotic supplements.”

Analyzing results of nine high-quality studies examining blood pressure and probiotic consumption in 543 adults with normal and elevated blood pressure, researchers found:

  • Probiotic consumption lowered systolic blood pressure (the top number) by an average 3.56…

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5 Tricks to Avoid Being Hungry All the Time

Tony:

Research backs what I find to be true for myself and my clients: drinking plenty of water can help manage appetite. One study found that people who drink about seven cups of water per day eat nearly 200 fewer daily calories compared to those who gulp less than one glass.

Originally posted on Our Better Health:

July 11, 2014    By Cynthia Sass, MPH, RD

Once, one of my clients half-jokingly requested an exorcism from the demon possessing her body: hunger. Kind of a gruesome analogy but, truth be told, it’s fairly accurate considering how out of control she felt. When my clients struggle like this, I often say I wish I could wave a magic wand to make it all better, which of course I can’t. But what I can do is offer some tried and true advice to effectively rein in appetite and help regain a sense of balance. The five strategies below are tops for doing just that, and each also has the power to enhance your overall health. Win-win!

Make sweating fun

Have you ever found yourself hungrier after working out, and then “ate back” more calories than you burned exercising? It’s a common phenomenon, and the trick to breaking the cycle…

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