8 Nutrients to Protect the Aging Brain

Tony:

I like the idea of eight nutrients to protect the aging brain, but do not forget for a moment that exercise is absolutely critical for this. Please read my Page – Important facts about your Brain (and Exercise Benefits) to read further on this important subject.

Tony

Originally posted on Cooking with Kathy Man:

Brain health is the second most important component in maintaining a healthy lifestyle according to a 2014 AARP study. As people age they can experience a range of cognitive issues from decreased critical thinking to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. In the March issue of Food Technology published by the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT), contributing editor Linda Milo Ohr writes about eight nutrients that may help keep your brain in good shape.

  1. Cocoa Flavanols: Cocoa flavanols have been linked to improved circulation and heart health, and preliminary research shows a possible connection to memory improvement as well. A study showed cocoa flavanols may improve the function of a specific part of the brain called the dentate gyrus, which is associated with age-related memory (Brickman, 2014).
  2. Omega-3 Fatty Acids: Omega-3 fatty acids have long been shown to contribute to good heart health are now playing a role in cognitive health as…

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Top 10 Exercise Myths – Infographic

We should all be getting exercise on a daily basis. Fully employed folks do that with some difficulty if at all. So, we should definitely get the full benefits from what we are doing on the machines, out there running, or whatever form or activity we have chosen.

Here are some mistakes we make.

9d40ee3bf7c02fa39adb0bfaf9dd1dcfTony

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7 Myths on Sodium Consumption Busted – American Heart Association

The American Heart Association recommends we limit our sodium consumption to 1500 mg per day, but that doesn’t mean we have to eliminate salt from our diet. We just need to pay attention to how much we are consuming.

I thought there were some particularly useful ideas in this, particularly that 75 percent of the sodium we consume comes from processed foods.

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Tony

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The Sugar Addiction Cycle – Infographic

As a person who has had a problem with sugar consumption, I could appreciate this.

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Tony

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How the Brain Benefits from Exercise – Infographic

I feel strongly that the importance of exercise to the brain is largely overlooked in the world of fitness. The following are from just 20 minutes of exercise.

To read much more on this, check out my Page – Important Facts About Your Brain (and Exercise Benefits).

TrRwfye

Tony

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Why People Fail at Losing Weight

quote-Mark-Twain-giving-up-smoking-is-the-easiest-thing-88411I think Mark Twain’s words on quitting smoking translate perfectly to the way people handle losing weight. Most people keep doing it over and over. Yo yo dieting. Despite all the words and books written and DVDs made on weight loss and exercise, more than half of us are overweight and nearly a third of us are outright obese.

I think I know why.

I have been writing this blog more than five years now and in the course of it I have read thousands of pages on losing weight. Every day it’s the same, take off pounds fast, eat these fat burning foods. Burn those inches off your waist with these movements. And on.

In the past five years, I have learned that the battle of the bulge starts in the brain. As above, so below. To succeed at losing weight, you need to decide that you currently have some unhealthy habits and you are going to end them. Those extra pounds are a result of the unhealthy habits. But that is just the beginning. Page one…

The magic secret to losing weight and keeping it off is very simple. Not easy at first, but simple. You need to understand that losing weight is the beginning, not the end. You don’t take off those five, 10 or 15 pounds you are carrying and then your problems are solved. When you get those pounds off, you don’t quit, breathe a sigh of relief and go back to your old unhealthy ways. You don’t celebrate by going out and eating a pizza.

One of the courses I have taken since retiring is “Lifelong Health: Achieving Optimum Well-Being at any Age” The instructor is Dr. Anthony Goodman. There are many wonderful lessons in it and if you have the time and inclination, I recommend you check it out at The Great Courses. 41yylmmgocl-_sy300_I think the most important concept I got from that course was the origin of the word diet. Dr. Goodman points out that the word diet comes from the Greek diaita – which means a manner of living or a way of life.

So, if you decide to go on a diet to lose weight, go on that kind of a diet. Change your manner of living, in particular how you relate to food and exercise.

If you go on that kind of diet, you are on the right track. Pay attention to what, and especially, how much you eat. Make sure you get your exercise as close to daily as is humanly possible. And realize that is the manner in which you will live going forward. You will not slip back into your old, careless unhealthy habits that allowed you to pack on those extra pounds in the first place. You won’t be a Mark Twain type of dieter.

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Eat less; move more; live longer. Simple, but not easy, at first. I have been doing it for five years now and I think it has actually become easy because it is the way of my life. My weight has stayed in the 150 pound area since I first lost the pounds writing this blog and I haven’t put it back. You can do the same.

Tony

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Four Foods That Can Help You to Lose Weight – Infographic

Getting control of your weight depends on a lot of variables. How much, when and what you eat are all relevant. Here are four that you can count on.

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Age-related Changes in the Brain Can Have Significant Impact on Individuals, Society

Tony:

This is by far one of the best summaries I have read about age-related changes in the brain.

It questions the value of those ‘brain games’ seniors are buying and recommends being physically active, among other things.

To read more on this very important subject, check out my Page – Important Facts About Your Brain (and Exercise).

Tony

Originally posted on Cooking with Kathy Man:

Gradual and variable change in mental functions that occurs naturally as people age, not as part of a neurological disease such as Alzheimer’s disease, is one of the most challenging health issues encountered by older adults, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine. The aging process affects the brain just like any other part of the body. Known as “cognitive aging,” the type and rate of change can vary widely among individuals. Some will experience very few, if any, effects, while others may experience changes in their memory, speed of processing information, problem solving, learning, and decision-making abilities. The committee that carried out the study and wrote the report proposed three top actions individuals can take to help maintain optimal cognitive function with age.

“Changes in mental functions and capabilities are a part of aging and occur with everyone,” said committee chair Dan G. Blazer, the J.P. Gibbons…

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One hundred years young: Frank Booth’s vision for a healthier America

Tony:

“We’re spending too much money on curing and not enough on preventing to have to cure,” he said. Though the NIH has made recent changes to include more exercise physiologists on its review committees, neither “exercise” nor “physical inactivity” is listed among the agency’s 244 funded research areas.

Wow. Frank Booth’s work provides living proof of the mantra – eat less; move more ; live longer.

Regular readers know how strongly I feel about the benefits of exercise, not only only the body, but the brain as well. To explore this further: check out my Page Important Facts About Your Brain (and Exercise).

Tony

Originally posted on Unearthed:

By Rachel Zamzow

DSC_0027 Frank Booth, 71, takes a break from running on the treadmill in his office. Inspired by his research on the effects of exercise, Booth runs several miles each day. Photo by Rachel Zamzow.

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Frank Booth wants people to live to be 100. And then be told they have 48 hours to live. Only at the very end of life should people succumb to conditions such as cancer or heart disease, he says. Then, a serious illness wouldn’t be a tragedy; it’d be cause for throwing one last giant party.

Booth, an exercise physiology professor at the University of Missouri, figures that we should thrive until the end of our lives instead of gradually declining into sickness. Our lifespan should not outlast our healthspan. Otherwise, he wonders, what’s the point of sticking around for so long?

Unfortunately, a large proportion of the U.S. population is chronically…

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A Dozen Super Hydrating Fruits and Veggies – Infographic

Everyone knows about drinking eight glasses of water a day, but they forget that we get a lot of water from fruits and veggies. This is another good reason for integrating fresh fruits and veggies into our daily diet.

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I often eat fresh watermelon after a bike ride. Besides tasting wonderful, I have found it to be a super re-hydrator and energizer. To read more check out:

How Healthy is Watermelon?
Vita Mix – Drinking a Watermelon
Vita-Mix – Watermelon Sorbet Recipe
Watermelon Cooler – Guest Post Kelli Jennings

Tony

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Scientists Discovered A New Way to Cook Rice that Cuts the Calories

Tony:

An undergraduate student at the College of Chemical Sciences in Sri Lanka and his mentor have been tinkering with a new way to cook rice that can reduce its calories by as much as 50 percent and even offer a few other added health benefits. The ingenious method, which at its core is just a simple manipulation of chemistry, involves only a couple easy steps in practice.

I love this, yes another way to use coconut oil and increase our consumption of it. If you don’t know the very great food value of coconut oil, check out my Page – Coconut Oil: Why You Should Include it in Your Diet.

Tony

Originally posted on Cooking with Kathy Man:

Rice, the lifeblood of so many nations’ cuisines, is perhaps the most ubiquitous food in the world. In Asia, where an estimated 90 percent of all rice is consumed, the pillowy grains are part of almost every meal. In the Caribbean, where the starch is often mixed with beans, it’s a staple too. Even here in the United States, where people eat a comparatively modest amount of rice, plenty is still consumed.

Rice is popular because it’s malleable—it pairs well with a lot of different kinds of food—and it’s relatively cheap. But like other starch-heavy foods, it has one central flaw: it isn’t that good for you. White rice consumption, in particular, has been linked to a higher risk of diabetes. A cup of the cooked grain carries with it roughly 200 calories, most of which comes in the form of starch, which turns into sugar, and often thereafter body…

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Exercise More and Live Longer – New York Times

Gretchen Reynolds, writing in the New York Times, had some great information on the value of exercise in terms of living longer. She said that one of the problems with exercise is that experts aren’t clear on how much is too little, too much or just the right amount to for us to be healthy and, more importantly, to improve our longevity.

In one broad large scale study, comparing 14 years of death records, “They found that, unsurprisingly, the people who did not exercise at all were at the highest risk of early death.

7-Health-Benefits-Of-Walking-Every-Day“But those who exercised a little, not meeting the recommendations but doing something, lowered their risk of premature death by 20 percent.”

“Those who met the guidelines precisely, completing 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise, enjoyed greater longevity benefits and 31 percent less risk of dying during the 14-year period compared with those who never exercised.”

As a senior citizen who works on endurance and worries about breaking and tearing body parts with strenuous exercise, I was gratified to learn the conclusion: “The sweet spot for exercise benefits, however, came among those who tripled the recommended level of exercise, working out moderately, mostly by walking, for 450 minutes per week, or a little more than an hour per day. Those people were 39 percent less likely to die prematurely than people who never exercised.”

I have said time and again in this blog that walking is the Cinderella of exercise world – totally under-appreciated, but really royalty.

Eat less; move more has been the mantra of this blog almost from the beginning. I would like to amend that to: eat less; move more; live longer.

Here are some of the posts I have done concerning seniors and exercise:
Why Seniors Need to Exercise – NIH
Weight Training Techniques for Seniors
What About Seniors Doing Endurance Sports?
What are the Guidelines for Seniors Exercising?

To read more on the benefits of walking:
Why You Should be Walking More
20 Benefits of Walking – Infographic
ow Good is Walking for You? – Infographic
Is Walking as Effective an Exercise as Running?
What are the Benefits of Walking and Bicycle Riding?

Last, but not least, no one wants to live long without the benefit of a fully functioning brain: check out my Page – Important Facts About Your Brain (and Exercise). You can have it all.
Tony

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What Are Six Sodium-boosting Popular Foods? – Infographic

The American Heart Association (AHA) says we keep our sodium intake below 1500 mg per day. If we eat a lot of these foods that is going to be a tough task.

Processed foods are big offenders in the sodium realm.

The AHA says:

Here are the approximate amounts of sodium, in milligrams, in a given amount of table salt:

  • 1/4 teaspoon salt = 575 mg sodium
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt = 1,150 mg sodium
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt = 1,725 mg sodium
  • 1 teaspoon salt = 2,300 mg sodium

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Everything You Wanted to Know About Calories, but Were Afraid to Ask – Infographic

I ran across this Calorie infographic on the web and thought you might enjoy it as much as I did.

I like that it shows some activities and how many calories you burn per hour.

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Black Magic: Chocolate Syrup on Ice

Tony:

My friend and fellow blogger, Ms. Vinny Grette, has just published this brilliant post on a really fun topping that is so simple even Mr. Lazy Cook can do it. I can’t get over this utterly easy combination of two very healthy ingredients to made a scrumptious topping for ice cream, fruit or whatever your own creativity suggests.

As regular readers know, I am a giant fan of coconut oil, check out my Page – Coconut Oil -Why You Should Include it in Your Diet I have also posted on the health benefits of Why and How You Should Include Raw Cacao in Your Diet.

Tony

Originally posted on Cook Up a Story:

Black ice - chocolate magicJust two ingredients…

Awesome! This idea came my way courtesy of the Paddington Foodie, chef extraordinaire. It’s ridiculously easy. Combining just two super-foods, this simple syrup zaps any dessert you like with goodness that is sure to grant you the superpowers of your dreams.

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What You Need to Know About High Blood Pressure – Infographics

I went to a talk at Northwestern Memorial Hospital on high blood pressure late in 2011. I wrote the post What is High Blood Pressure then.

Some of the points made in the post included: “Normal (blood pressure) BP is 120/80, systolic/diastolic. Prehypertensive is 120-139 over 80-89. Stage one hypertension is 140-159 over 90 – 99. Stage two hypertension reads 160 -179 over 100 – 109.

“Modifiable causes of high BP or hypertension include smoking, obesity, lack of physical activity, dietary salt, alcohol consumption and stress.

“Causes of high BP over which we have no control include older age, genetics, family history of high BP, chronic kidney disease and adrenal and thyroid disorders.

“The Mayo Clinic said that most people with high BP have no signs or symptoms, even if BP readings reach dangerously high levels.”

I hope this has piqued your curiosity about high blood pressure because I have found two dynamite infographics on it that will fill in a lot of details. The first is from the American Heart Association and is very personal and the second from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and covers a broad spectrum of high blood pressure in the U.S.
BPConsequencesmh_bp_infographicTony

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