Tag Archives: fat

Reduce body fat; keep muscle mass – Infographic

I thought there was some good info in this. Enjoy!

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Tony

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Filed under abdominal fat, belly fat, body fat, Exercise, exercise benefits, fat, fat loss, fat tissue, Fats, Weight

Don’t get hung up on your BMI (Body Mass Index)

I thought it might be timely to take another look at BMI (Body Mass Index) as we enter the holidays and we battle the bulge at holiday parties, family dinners, etc.

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Tony

One Regular Guy Writing about Food, Exercise and Living Past 100

The usually reliable WebMD has a very nice quiz on fat that I recommend you take. It’s fun and can fill you in on some aspects of body fat that most folks don’t understand.

Having said that, I would like to take exception to the final question in the quiz which asks which BMI category is healthier? Anything below obese; The low end of normal; Anything in the normal range.

I wish we would do away with the BMI as a tool in evaluating fitness, health, fatness, you name it.

First of all, a lot of people think it tells them their percentage of body fat. It doesn’t. A person’s BMI is calculated as her weight in kilograms divided by her height in meters, squared.

It is an index, not a body fat measurement.

The readings are as follows: Underweight: less than 18.5; normal weight 18.5 – 24.9; overweight…

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All Fat Grams Are Not Created Equal

Here is another super infographic where one picture is worth a thousand words.

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NaturalNews says that avocados boost health in at least five ways:

1. Protein “Avocados provide all 18 essential amino acids necessary for the body to form a complete protein. Unlike the protein in steak, which is difficult for most people to digest, avocado protein is readily absorbed by the body because avocados also contain fiber. If you are trying to cut down on animal sources of protein in your diet, or if you are a vegetarian, vegan or raw foodist seeking more protein, avocados are a great nutritional ally to include not merely as an occasional treat, but as a regular part of your diet.”

To read more on good fats, check my post: Are Avocados Good for You?

For further info on junk food: A Love Letter to Hostess Ho Ho’s – NOT.

Tony

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Just Lose it!

I thought there were some good ideas here on general health and well-being, not just losing weight, or fat.

I especially liked the fact that he mentioned getting a good night’s sleep. This is definitely one of the under-appreciated aspects of good health. To read more on it, check out my Page – How important is a good night’s sleep?

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Tony

 

 

Here I was, sitting on my lazy butt eating because I had no set diet plan for the day. You get lazy, you eat crappy, it’s a cycle and you don’t even notice it.

So do you want to get fit? Do you want to lose that extra fat that makes you sick? Take these five tips seriously.

1. Cardio on an empty stomach upon waking up.  It can be difficult but try doing it right when u wake up, before hunger strikes. It’s a great fat burner as it targets directly your body  fat as opposed to the carbohydrates and foods you have just consumed.

2. Avoid Carbs after 6pm. Your body just can’t lose that and it will simply store into fat.

3. Focus on weight training, if you think pure cardio will lose that belly or lose that fat you are wrong.  Your body Works the most…

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Many U.S. Consumers Cutting Back on Sugar Consumption – NPD Group

The U.S. Dietary Guidelines for Americans, released every five years, were issued last month and one of the new guidelines’ strongest recommendation is something that consumers have already caught on to — limiting sugar intake, reports The NPD Group, a leading global information company.  Overall, U.S. consumers have indicated that sugar is the number one item they try to avoid in their diet and are eating less sugary foods and beverages, according to NPD’s ongoing food consumption research.

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The new dietary guidelines recommend that only 10 percent of daily calories come from added sugars. Although this may sound like a lofty goal, consumers have cut down on foods and beverages with high sugar content, like carbonated soft drinks, fruit drinks and juice, ice cream and frozen treats, and other sweet snacks. Consumption of sugar-free, unsweetened, or reduced sugar products, which is highest among young children and adults 55 and older, follows the trend in concern about sugar overall. Calories were once the top item consumers looked for on nutrition facts labels, but now it is sugar.

Cholesterol, the outcast of past dietary guidelines, is no longer a dietary concern according to the new guidelines.  NPD’s food consumption research shows that consumers are in line with this since their concern for cholesterol content has continued to decline since 2006. Eggs, which bore the brunt of the anti-cholesterol push, are back in vogue and consumption is up as consumers look for more sources of protein.

Eating more fruits and vegetables is a perennial federal dietary standard and is still front-and-center in the new guidelines. There is good and bad news in regards to this standard. The good news is: consumers are eating more fruits and fruit is among the top growing better-for-you snacks. The bad news is: vegetables are still fighting to find their way into Americans’ hearts and stomachs.

“Consumer alignment with the new guidelines speaks volumes to our collective shift toward eating more healthfully,” says Darren Seifer, NPD food and beverage industry analyst. “We have nutritional information at our fingertips. Some seek it consciously and others hear it subliminally. If there is a weight or health problem, it’s typically not a result of nutritional ignorance.”

For the record here are the key recommendations from the 2015 Guidelines:
•    Consume less than 10 percent of calories per day from added sugars
•    Consume less than 10 percent of calories per day from saturated fats
•    Consume less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) per day of sodium
•    If alcohol is consumed, it should be consumed in moderation—up to one drink per day for women and up to two drinks per day for men—and only by adults of legal drinking age.

Remember, to live healthy, you need to employ two tools: eat intelligently and exercise regularly. You can’t have one without the other.

Tony

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The Only Downside to My Weight Loss and Waist Loss

We talk a lot about the benefits of getting down to a healthy weight and having a trim waistline. Obesity is one of the acknowledged targets of the government with new dietary guidelines out for 2015.

I can attest to the benefits of reducing excess fat from your body. Your clothes fit better, indeed, you get to go out shopping for a new wardrobe with the latest fashions and nicer looking outfits. You have more energy and your disposition generally becomes more sunny. Lastly, you get wonderful feedback from your friends and acquaintances on how good you look.

Yet, as a person who has experienced all that, there was also one significant drawback to my trimming down from a 44 inch waist to a 34 inch one. Can you guess what it was?

I’ll give you a hint – it has to do with the current season.

Okay, it is very logical and yet I was totally surprised by it, like a well-written piece of fiction. When you drop all that fat – insulation – you become much more sensitive and vulnerable to the cold. That’s right. When winter comes around, I get out what we used to call long johns. Now it is ‘base layers.’ I start wearing my base layer in late October here in Chicago. Once the temps fall below 40F, I wear long johns. And I keep them on through March.

I wear long johns from October through March.

I asked my doctor about this phenomenon. Since it is my skin – on the outside – that feels the cold, why should what happens under the skin have an impact on my sensation of cold? This seemed a reasonable question. I understand the principle of insulation, but it is the outside that feels the cold so what difference does it make if we burn off 10 inches of fat – insulation – underneath the skin around my waistline?

The answer which is simple and obvious never occurred to me. It has to do with our core. Our major organs are in our midsection – the part that is insulated by the fat. When we burn that fat off, we figuratively expose our major organs to the cold. And, we get a very real sense of the cold that we never had before. So, we need to cover up with more insulation – to replace the fat.

A system like this provides wonderful protection against the cold wind.

The good news is that the solution is a simple one. I now ‘layer up.’ The long johns are the first line of defense against the cold. They are a good one. I have also become the biggest fan of the Eddie Bauer stores. They sell all that wonderful mountaineering equipment which weighs very little but affords super protection against the cold. I have purchased from them some excellent ‘systems’ which include an outer water repellent windproof shell which goes over a thin down-like jacket. It does the job. There is no wind that can blow through that combination. And, it is lightweight too.

When the temp drops below 20F, I put on my flannel-lined pants over the long johns for extra protection. I happen to be a dog owner and as every dog owner knows, there is nothing colder than taking Fido for a leisurely walk in freezing cold, because Fido doesn’t rush or even walk fast. So, the dog walker is very exposed to the elements.

Regular readers may be wondering how this sensitivity affects my bike riding which I continue year ’round here in Chicago. Because cycling is such an excellent cardiovascular activity, I have little problem with the cold. I do wear several layers and the cold does not deter me from riding.

So, the good news is that there is an excellent technological answer to the downside of burning off all your fat. You can still enjoy outdoor activities as before. Just dress correctly for the temperature. For further details on dressing correctly for the cold, check out my post – Cold Weather Cycling Tips.

With that in mind, I hope you can set about your own weight loss program with a clear view of what you have to look forward to.

Tony

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What Are My Chances of Getting Heart Disease?

Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the number one killer in the U.S. for both men and women.

What is heart disease? The U.S. National Library of Medicine describes it as “… a narrowing of the small blood vessels that supply blood and oxygen to the heart. CHD is also called coronary artery disease.”

CHD results from plaque building up on the walls of your coronary arteries. You might know it as hardening of the arteries. The buildup causes the arteries to narrow and then blood flow to the heart can slow down or stop entirely.

A risk factor is anything that can increase your chance of getting it. There are two types of risk factors – Those you can change and those that you can’t change.

According to The U.S. National Library of Medicine:

The risk factors for heart disease that you CANNOT change are:
• Your age. The risk of heart disease increases with age.
• Your gender. Men have a higher risk of getting heart disease than women who are still getting their menstrual period. After menopause, the risk for women is closer to the risk for men.
• Your genes. If your parents or other close relatives had heart disease, you are at higher risk.
• Your race. African Americans, Mexican Americans, American Indians, Hawaiians, and some Asian Americans also have a higher risk for heart problems.

Risk factors over which you have some control include:
• Do not smoke or use tobacco.
• Get plenty of exercise, at least 30 minutes a day on at least 5 days a week (talk to your doctor first).
• Maintain a healthy weight. Men and women should aim for a body mass index (BMI) between 18.5 and 24.9.
• Get checked and treated for depression.
• Women who are at high risk for heart disease should take omega-3 fatty acid supplements.
• If you drink alcohol, limit yourself to no more than one drink per day for women, and no more than two drinks per day for men.

Must confess that it is great to see that once again proper diet and regular exercise cover a multitude of sins. As I have said over and over here on the blog: Eat less; move more; live longer.

Tony

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The Skinny on Fat – Infographic

I like this info on this infographic. It turns out that fat does burn calories, just not very many.
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Tony

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Certain Foods Can Damage Your Ability To Think Flexibly

“We’ve known for a while that too much fat and sugar are not good for you.

This work suggests that fat and sugar are altering your healthy bacterial systems, and that’s one of the reasons those foods aren’t good for you.

It’s not just the food that could be influencing your brain, but an interaction between the food and microbial changes.”

The ‘Western diet’ that many consume daily is high in sugar, fat and simple carbohydrates.

I am fascinated by the workings of the brain, and in this case, how we can mess up a perfectly good system with bad diet. I think this post makes clear that we need to eat well and exercise in order to stay healthy. We don’t just adopt a few changes to drop a couple of pounds and then revert to our bad eating.

Tony

Our Better Health

A high-fat, high-sugar diet causes significant damage to cognitive flexibility, a new study finds.

Cognitive flexibility is the ability to adjust and adapt to changing situations.

The high-sugar diet was most damaging, the research on mice found.

This caused impairments in both long- and short-term memory.

This is just the latest in a line of studies showing the potentially dramatic effects of diet on mental performance.

Professor Kathy Magnusson, who co-led the study, said:

“The impairment of cognitive flexibility in this study was pretty strong.

Think about driving home on a route that’s very familiar to you, something you’re used to doing.

Then one day that road is closed and you suddenly have to find a new way home.”

With lower cognitive flexibility, adapting to these kinds of changes would be more difficult.

Professor Magnusson said it wasn’t yet clear how these damaging effects were caused:

“It’s increasingly clear that…

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The Sugar Addiction Cycle – Infographic

As a person who has had a problem with sugar consumption, I could appreciate this.

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Tony

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How Much is a Pound of Fat? – Infographic

I was torn about posting this. On the one hand, I feel like everyone knows a pound of fat is 3500 calories, so it is redundant. On the other, there is a lot of good information in it besides the 3500 calories.  Hope you find it useful.

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Tony

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10 Secrets About Your Metabolism That Can Help You Lose Weight – Infographic

This infographic has some good suggestions for trimming back the pounds. If you want to read further on this, check out my Page – How to Lose Weight – And Keep it Off.

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Number 10 tells you to reduce stress. In my post Super Tools For Handling Stress you can find useful techiques.

Tony

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How Trans Fat Eats Away At Your Memory

We’re not eating as much trans fat as we used to: a recent study found that between 1980-2009, we cut down on trans fats about 35% thanks to regulations and reformulations. Still, trans fat is the bane of every health nut’s label-reading experience—it travels under sneaky ingredient adjectives like “partially hydrogenated” and can even creep into foods labeled “0 grams of trans fat.”

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TIME

What’s the opposite of brain food?

Trans fat, finds a new study presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2014. Eating a lot of the compound that magically rejuvenates junk food that should have expired long ago is linked to higher rates of memory impairment.

After analysis of food questionnaires and memory tests from about 1,000 adult men, trans fat intake was linked to worse memory in people under age 45, even after controlling for mind-influencing factors like age, depression and education. Every gram of trans fat eaten per day was linked to 0.76 fewer words recalled. Put another way? Those who ate the most trans fat remembered 11 fewer words.

MORE: 7 Foods That Wouldn’t Be The Same If Trans Fats Are Banned

That relationship eased when researchers adjusted for BMI and blood pressure, and a study like this can’t prove cause and effect. But the study…

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6 Common Chocolate Myths, Busted

The information below is based on a one ounce serving of 70 percent dark chocolate or one tablespoon of cocoa powder. An ounce of dark chocolate is about a quarter cup, grated. That’s usually about 1/3 of a regular-sized chocolate bar.

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Our Better Health

Becky Striepe     November 4, 2014

From fat content to acne to your sex drive, there are some big claims out there about chocolate. Check out these common chocolate myths and the truth about chocolate.

When it comes to chocolate and health, the trick isn’t avoiding chocolate altogether. It’s making smart choices. Sure, if you eat a whole Hershey’s bar, you’re not doing your health any favors. But a few squares of good, dark chocolate can actually be beneficial. You can also add 1-3 teaspoons of cocoa powder to a smoothie recipe to instantly transform it into a healthy, chocolatey treat. The sugars from the fruit will offset the cocoa powder’s bitterness. Start with a teaspoon, taste, and add more until you get just the right balance.

The information below is based on a one ounce serving of 70 percent dark chocolate or one tablespoon of cocoa powder. An…

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Almonds May Lower Heart Disease Risk

The quantity of almonds and muffins provided to each participant varied according to estimations to maintain his or her baseline weight. The muffins were formulated to provide the same number of calories and the same amount of saturated fat (SFA), polyunsaturated fat (PUFA), protein, and fiber as the almonds.

Cooking with Kathy Man

A study published in the British Journal of Nutrition shows that eating almonds daily may improve certain factors associated with heart disease risk.

The randomized, controlled clinical study, conducted by researchers at the University of Toronto, included 27 adult participants (mean age of 64 years) with elevated LDL cholesterol. Participants followed a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol that also included each of three dietary interventions for four weeks each in a crossover design. Each day for four weeks, researchers gave one group 50–100 g (2–4 oz) of almonds. A control group received 100–200 g of muffins and a third group received 25–50 g (1–2 oz) of almonds plus 50–100 g of muffins. Each participant completed all three dietary treatments, so the total length of the study was 12 weeks.

The quantity of almonds and muffins provided to each participant varied according to estimations to maintain his or her…

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Which Do You Prefer? – Bacon and Eggs or A Bagel with Low Fat Cream Cheese?

This cutie from Pinterest can be a companion piece to How Processed Foods Hinder Weight Loss of two days ago.
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The carbs in your stomach digest faster than most other nutrients. Carbs used for energy are digested, flooding your bloodstream with glucose. Your body rapidly secretes insulin, which signals your body to store fat, in two ways: Insulin tells your fat cells to pull in fat from the bloodstream, making you fatter. Insulin tells your fat cells to prevent fatty acids from leaving, preventing you from becoming thinner.

I hope you will choose the bacon and eggs.

To read more about another good fat, check out my Page on Why You Should Include Coconut Oil in Your Diet. There are lots of good fats.

Tony

 

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