HARVEY WEINSTEIN AND OTHER PRIAPIC PREDATORS

Here is a fascinating and kind of eerie analysis of Harvey Weinstein that shows him to be a predator of culture as much as he was of women.

Tony

venitism

By Daniel Greenfield

In the spring of his final year as a movie mogul, Harvey Weinstein was doing what he always did. Or rather what he always did in public view: as opposed to what he has been accused of doing in hotel rooms and deserted office storage rooms. He was fighting a ratings war over a movie with adult content.

The movie was 3 Generations. It had been made two years earlier to cash in on the transgender boom. Back then it was called About Ray. But the reviews were bad and the movie was pulled a few days before it was supposed to be released. What do you do with a bad politically correct movie that you paid $6 million for? You start a culture war. And that’s exactly what Harvey Weinstein did.

He enlisted GLAAD, the gay rights group, to lobby for a PG-13 rating for the…

View original post 1,297 more words

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Clinton, Harvey Weinstein, mainstream media, Obama

Do You Contribute To Discovering The CURE For Breast Cancer?

While a little off the beaten path, this post has some useful information on donating to fight breast cancer.

Tony

All About Healthy Choices

Passionately Pink JPGcropped400The Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation (later known as Susan G. Komen for the Cure) has become the largest and most well known breast cancer organization in the United States: It was started by Susan G Komen’s sister (Nancy Goodman Brinker) in 1982.

We want to believe that tragedies like Susan’s story of breast cancer develop into massive organizations (ex.Susan G. Komen for the Cure) based on honest altruistic intentions to offer real hope to OTHERS suffering from this dreaded disease.

What do the facts reveal about Nancy Brinker’s financial gains as Founder and CEO and the success her organization has achieved winning the “war” against beast cancer?

.

“In early 2012, the Komen organization announced it was pulling its grants for breast-cancer screenings from Planned Parenthood, drawing an immediate backlash from Komen supporters and abortion rights advocates. Within days, Nancy Brinker, the group’s founder and CEO, reversed…

View original post 532 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under breast cancer, cancer

Weekend fitness funnies …

I hope you are in the midst of a post-Friday the 13th weekend. I’m not superstitious; it’s unlucky.

864bf5dfeca3f294e22f00476d3fcf2e

Playing fetch with your dog is good exercise.

9f53b2762823aa2fd20e981954699e48

4049b40578f0ef7b244d5db0e0be94f4

Dog is Better at Yoga

You should at least be as good as your dog at yoga.

45ca685825e067f34072a9bf68b17010

Watermelon is a very healthy snack.

Tony

4 Comments

Filed under fitness funnies

How to fight Triskaidekaphobia

I wrote this for the Friday the 13th in January. Thought you might like it.

Tony

One Regular Guy Writing about Food, Exercise and Living Past 100

Feeling blue on Friday the 13th? Perhaps you are triskaidecaphobic, which is to say, fearful of Friday the 13th.

Wikipedia says, “Triskaidekaphobia (from Greektris meaning “3”, kai meaning “and”, deka meaning “10” and phobos meaning “fear” or “morbid fear”) is fear of the number 13 and avoidance to use it; it is a superstition and related to the specific fear of the 13th person at the Last Supper being Judas, who was said to have stabbed Jesus Christ in the back (metaphorically). It is also a reason for the fear of Friday the 13th.”

The publication Environmental Nutrition offers the following 5 foods that are super nutritious and might bring you good luck at least in terms of your general health.

Amazing avocados, is their first offering. “Ounce for ounce, they contain more blood-pressure lowering potassium than bananas. Avocados are rich in good-for-you monounsaturated fats, and…

View original post 231 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Triskaidekaphobia

Obesity rates around the world

Maybe this is part of the curse of affluence, but it is the wrong contest to be way out in front of the competition. Shamefully, obesity rates in the U.S. far outstrip the rest of the world.

DL8RVL8W4AAn7ZP

I have posted on the dangers of obesity in the past:

A fresh look at obesity – Harvard

How does obesity cause disease in organs distant from where the fat accumulates?

Public largely ignorant about obesity risks

How does obesity affect you?

What about belly fat? Central obesity

Tony

2 Comments

Filed under abdominal fat, belly fat, body fat, fat, obesity

Give Yourself More Credit for Doing These Things

There are some really nice positive ideas here. What seem like little things often count plenty in the big picture.

Tony

Our Better Health

Let’s do a roll call: who here has been giving themselves a hard time lately? If this is you, it’s time to cut yourself some slack! You may not realize it, but there are countless things you accomplish every day that are absolutely praiseworthy.

No, really! If we don’t give ourselves credit for the small stuff, how can we feel comfortable patting on ourselves when we accomplish something massive?

The next time you start doubting yourself and your capabilities, reflect on this list as a reminder of all that you do that is right as rain. And give yourself some credit – you really deserve it.

1. Catching Some ZZZs

Getting enough sleep every night is not an easy feat! Whether we’re a working parent of triplets or someone who is struggling with managing their anxiety levels, the fact that we get as many ZZZs as we can is a…

View original post 409 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under good night's sleep, Positive Psychology, positive thinking, positivity, sleep, sleep deprivation

The TB12 Method – Tom Brady’s book

In the interest of full disclosure, I am a big fan of the New England Patriots and their quarterback, Tom Brady. I may be the only guy in Chicago with a Patriots jacket. I posted on Tom back before the Super Bowl, talking about his wonderful health and everything he does to maintain it. I quoted from a New York Times piece on the subject. At the time I wanted to learn much more about this quasi fountain of youth he seemed to have found. Must confess, I contemplated a trip East to study with the master.

Now comes an entire book on Brady’s findings that is available to all of us without leaving our homes. TB12 is the title. You can find it on Amazon.

tb12-book-trailer-00-00-24-29-still001.jpg

While I have secured a copy of the book, I have only begun to read it. However, the following facts from Simon & Schuster should give you plenty of reason to explore further. I will be posting more on it after I finish reading it.

What is pliability training? Pliability training consist of targeted, deep-force muscle work that lengthens and softens muscles at the same time those muscles are rhythmiscally contracted and relaxed. The book includes step-by-step photos and instructions for how to work 18 different muscle groups using self-pliability and assisted devices. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under Exercise, exercise benefits, Tom Brady

One Hour of Exercise a Week Can Prevent Depression

Herewith more positive reinforcement for our mantra of eat less; move more; live longer. Neuroscience News reports that a  landmark study led by the Black Dog Institute has revealed that regular exercise of any intensity can prevent future depression – and just one hour can help.

Published today in the American Journal of Psychiatry, the results show even small amounts of exercise can protect against depression, with mental health benefits seen regardless of age or gender.

Results showed that people who reported doing no exercise at all at baseline had a 44% increased chance of developing depression compared to those who were exercising one to two hours a week. NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.

In the largest and most extensive study of its kind, the analysis involved 33,908 Norwegian adults who had their levels of exercise and symptoms of depression and anxiety monitored over 11 years.

The international research team found that 12 percent of cases of depression could have been prevented if participants undertook just one hour of physical activity each week.

“We’ve known for some time that exercise has a role to play in treating symptoms of depression, but this is the first time we have been able to quantify the preventative potential of physical activity in terms of reducing future levels of depression,” said lead author Associate Professor Samuel Harvey from Black Dog Institute and UNSW.

“These findings are exciting because they show that even relatively small amounts of exercise – from one hour per week – can deliver significant protection against depression.

“We are still trying to determine exactly why exercise can have this protective effect, but we believe it is from the combined impact of the various physical and social benefits of physical activity.

“These results highlight the great potential to integrate exercise into individual mental health plans and broader public health campaigns. If we can find ways to increase the population’s level of physical activity even by a small amount, then this is likely to bring substantial physical and mental health benefits.” Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under cardio exercise, depression, Exercise, exercise and brain health, exercise benefits

40% Of Cancers Diagnosed In U.S. Related To Obesity, CDC Says

As if we needed another reason to pay attention to our weight as well as what (and how much) we eat. Here is the CDC with some hard facts.

Tony

Our Better Health

Add cancer to the many good reasons to strive for a healthy weight

The rates of 12 obesity-related  cancers rose by 7 per cent from 2005 to 2014, an increase that is threatening to reverse progress in reducing the rate of cancer in the United States, U.S. health officials say.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 630,000 people in the United States were diagnosed with a cancer linked with being overweight or obese in 2014.

Obesity-related cancers accounted for about 40 per cent of all cancers diagnosed in the United States in 2014. Although the overall rate of new cancer diagnoses has fallen since the 1990s,  rates of obesity-related cancers have been rising.

“Today’s report shows in some cancers we’re going in the wrong direction,” Dr. Anne Schuchat of the CDC said on a conference call with reporters.

According to the International Agency for…

View original post 250 more words

2 Comments

Filed under cancer, cancer screening, obesity

Special Day …

Okay, it’s not a cool as Pi Day, March 14 (3.14), but it is unique. For some reason this kind of stuff gets me.

22279502_1668069103253714_2448220929665671636_n

Have a great weekend!

Tony

Leave a comment

Filed under special date

Weekend fitness funnies …

I hope you are having a wonderful weekend. I just came back from brunch with my grown daughter who is in town from her home in Indianapolis. So mine is off to a great start.

56b64afbb051c0c5672969a5d00b43c3

Try to stay hydrated

15d3eda2b21356a91483ebbeeae88baa

Skipping is excellent exercise

 

a813332241630ddc92ef6e63832dd856

7bc65fd73d17035e0b76b2efefa1bb35

10026eac7aca68603f23e1a7bfb1913f

Tony

1 Comment

Filed under fitness funnies, fitness humor

5 Habits that work for weight loss – Harvard

I think that deciding to live a healthy life is a far more rewarding goal than ‘losing a few pounds.’ Unfortunately, I think peoples’ eyes glaze over contemplating the general idea of living a health life. Whereas, lopping off a few offending pounds resonates. Statistics show that 60 percent of us are overweight and half of those folks are outright obese. So, we need to know some weight loss techniques. I think Harvard does a good job on this list from the Harvard Heart Letter.

1. Make time to prepare healthy meals

Home-cooked food tends to be far lower in calories, fat, salt, and sugar than restaurant food and most processed food. But it takes time and effort to choose recipes, go to the store, and cook. Take a close look at your weekly schedule to see if you can carve out a few hours to devote to meal planning and shopping, which is more than half the battle, says Dr. Blackburn. It could be on Sunday afternoon or in 15- to 30-minute increments throughout the week. Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under Harvard, ideal weight, overweight, Weight, weight control, weight loss

The latest buzz word in health: METABOLIC SYNDROME

Herewith a wonderful write up on Metabolic Syndrome, a medical condition that sadly seems to be gaining in popularity. Dr. Jonathan gives a superb explanation of it and what you can do to avoid succumbing to it.

Tony

All About Healthy Choices

page-21croppedThe diagnosis metabolic syndrome dates back to the 1950’s. It became more popular around the late 1970’s when the low fat diets first became popular. Today, it is a diagnosis used regularly to define an ever growing percentage of our population. We doctors make it sound like a “disease” requiring our intervention to overcome this life threatening syndrome. In reality, it is a state of dysfunction caused PRIMARILY by the consumer.

What is Metabolic Syndrome? It is a state of diminishing health based on an individual diagnosed with any three of the following five conditions:

  1. elevated blood pressure (≥ 130/85mmHg)

  2. elevated fasting blood sugar (≥100mg/dL)

  3. excess body fat around the waste (abdominal obesity >35 inches in women and >40 inches in men)

  4. HDL cholesterol ≤40 mg/dL for men or 50 mg/dL for women

  5. elevated triglycerides (≥150 mg/dL)

In real numbers, these conditions exist in the United States population as follows:

  1. as of…

View original post 416 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under blood pressure, body fat, cholesterol, fat, HDL Cholesterol, LDL Cholesterol, metabolic syndrome

Keeping Your Arteries Young – Tufts

The subject of aging is truly a multi-faceted one. I know, at 77, I feel like I find new aspects of it revealed nearly every day. Following is a write up from Tufts Health and Nutrition Letter that contains some good, positive information. All bold face items are my emphasis.

24ntartery.transformed.jpg

It’s common to develop significantly stiffer arteries and high blood pressure as we age past our 50s. Healthy lifestyle factors may go a long way toward slowing this process. A new study published in Hypertension suggests healthy vascular (blood vessel) aging may be possible even in people 70 years and older.

“This study showed that regardless of age, following a healthy lifestyle and controlling cardiovascular risk factors translates to fewer adverse heart disease events,” says Alice H. Lichtenstein, DSc, director of Tufts’ HNRCA Cardiovascular Nutrition Laboratory, who was not involved in the study. “That’s very encouraging.”

Artery Aging:

Most prior studies have looked at associations between poor vascular health and increased risk of cardiovascular events, like heart attack and stroke. But this study, led by Teemu J. Niiranen, MD, a research fellow at Boston University School of Medicine, focused on people with healthier arteries at the start of the study. “We found that it’s possible to maintain the blood vessels of people in their 20s, even into old age, but it’s rare in the Western world,” he says. At age 50, about 30% of those studied had healthy vascular aging. Over age 70, only 1% of people had healthy arteries. Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under aging, arterial plaque, arteries, Exercise, exercise benefits, healthy arteries, successful aging

Your ticket to ride …

I am thrilled to report that today marks the 17th anniversary of my retirement. On October 2 of 2000, I bade the financial world adieu and started my life as a guy who didn’t have to get up for work. I got my first job at the age of 10 sweeping the floor of a dry cleaner and continued to work till I reached 60. Although my degree is in Finance, I went into the publishing world writing and editing. I liked markets, but always knew I would write. I wrote and practiced journalism for most of my career, spending 20 years working for Reuters covering markets and then teaching journalism at Medill for several years. Because I had written about markets for 30 years, my boss at a major philanthropy asked me if I would like to manage some money. So, I managed $900 million in bond investments for the final five years of my working life.

No mas. I thought I would celebrate with this biking post. When I was working I used to tell my friends at the office that when I retired I was going to ride my bike on the Chicago lakefront every day. They thought that was funny. I was never more serious.

You all know how I ride my bike nearly every day year ’round here in Chicago. I do it because I love it. Period. Everything else is gravy.

I am always excited to run across items like the ones below. They point to some of the fun I get cycling. If you aren’t doing it, or haven’t done it for a while, think about giving it a spin. You might find that flying across the pavement feels really nice. As you can see from the infographic below, there are some notable physical benefits, too. 

0a050f7368e7e0437d254c3f509b50a2.jpg

221b8530fb73cb4dd4359d660d974128.jpg

1fdf5f13e8ec78792070d5567801e645.jpg

4da06f6fd01f8d69957e3e86ab3600ce.jpg

a35d9440ad96b4f88de5584483d2281d.jpg

ea23f9a0f1f897a8d2d2c8bb81dbedb6.jpg

Tony

6 Comments

Filed under biking, cold weather biking, commuter biking, Exercise, exercise benefits, regular bike riding, safe biking

Memory loss reversed in early Alzheimer’s – Study

Researchers have successfully reversed memory loss in a small number of people with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease using a comprehensive treatment program, which involves a combination of lifestyle changes, brain stimulation, and medication.

Researchers suggest the MEND program is highly effective for reversing memory loss.

2-brain

Memory improvements as a result of the treatment program have so far been sustained for 2 years, the researchers report, and some patients have even been able to return to work as a result.

Study co-author Dr. Dale Bredesen, of the Buck Institute on Research and Aging in Novato, CA, and colleagues recently published their findings in the journal Aging.

While the study only involved 10 patients, the researchers believe their findings may open the door to an effective therapy for cognitive decline.

“The magnitude of improvement in these 10 patients is unprecedented, providing additional objective evidence that this programmatic approach to cognitive decline is highly effective,” says Dr. Bredesen.

There are currently around 5.4 million people in the United States living with Alzheimer’s disease. Continue reading

7 Comments

Filed under aging, aging brain, Alzheimer's, Alzheimer's disease, brain, brain damage, brain function, memory, successful aging