Tag Archives: diet

Connecting the Dots Between Physical and Emotional Health

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I have written time and again about the connection between exercise and the brain. Here is a further connection between our emotions and our bodies.

Tony

Our Better Health

There’s a link between your emotional health and your physical well-being, so take time to nurture both.

To be completely healthy, you should take care not only of your physical health, but your emotional health, too. If one is neglected, the other will suffer.

What’s the Connection Between Emotional and Physical Health?

There’s a physical connection between what the mind is thinking and those parts of the brain that control bodily functions. According to Charles Goodstein, MD, a clinical professor of psychiatry at New York University’s Langone School of Medicine in New York City, the brain is intimately connected to our endocrine system, which secretes hormones that can have a powerful influence on your emotional health. “Thoughts and feelings as they are generated within the mind [can influence] the outpouring of hormones from the endocrine system, which in effect control much of what goes on within the body,” says Dr…

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Diet, Gut Microbes and Cognitive Decline Connected – Study

Researchers from Rush University Medical believe their new study will provide a mechanistic understanding of how our microbiome and diets can impact the development of Alzheimer’s disease. The study will aim to provide evidence of possible diet induced effects on gut bacteria, which could influence age associated cognitive decline.

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The study will recruit 300 volunteers from another study, the Chicago MIND cohort, which aims to show whether a dietary intervention can prevent cognitive decline and age-associated changes in the brain. NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.

Are abnormal intestinal microorganisms a risk factor for developing cognitive impairment? Researchers at Rush University Medical Center are trying to answer that question with a new study that will explore how the intestinal microbiota – the bacteria in the intestine –influence the progression of cognitive decline and the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Health care providers and researchers increasing are recognizing that the intestinal microbiota – also known as the microbiome – affects health. The human intestine contains tens of trillions of microorganisms, and humans have developed a symbiotic relationship with these bacteria in. Continue reading

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Filed under Alzheimer's disease, cognition, cognitive decline, diet, diet trends

Physical Activity May Influence the Health of Future Offspring

It just keeps getting better. The mantra of my blog is eat less; move more; live longer. That has always referred to yourself, present and future, mind and body. Now comes a fascinating study from Germany that suggests that the exercise you do today may well influence the health of your future offspring. What could be better than that?

Physical and mental exercise is not only beneficial for your own brain, but can also affect the learning ability of future offspring – at least in mice. This particular form of inheritance is mediated by certain RNA molecules that influence gene activity. These molecules accumulate in both the brain and germ cells following physical and mental activity.

Prof. André Fischer and colleagues from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) in Göttingen and Munich and the University Medical Center Göttingen (UMG) report these findings in the journal Cell Reports.

 

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It is known that physical activity and cognitive training also improve learning ability in humans. However, it is not so easy to study in humans whether learning ability can be inherited epigenetically. NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.

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Filed under brain function, brain health, cardio exercise, Exercise, exercise and brain health, exercise benefits

HOW TO LIVE A LONGER AND HEALTHIER LIFE

There are some excellent insights here on the eating aspects of living a long and healthy life.

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Biochemist Valter Longo has devoted decades to discovering connections between nutrition and successful aging. He runs the Longevity Institute at the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, where the focus is on extending healthy life spans and finding ways to prevent and treat conditions like cancer and cardiovascular disease that growing older makes us more susceptible to developing. Longo is also a professor of biological science at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

Armed with results from the lab — including clinical trials showing that cycles of a five-day fasting-mimicking diet can reduce risk factors for many life-threatening diseases — Longo is calling for change in the kitchen. In this Q&A, he reveals the role that food can play in keeping us youthful and tackles some common misconceptions related to how, what and when we should eat.

How important is food to our health and aging?

Other…

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Diet, exercise and fitness funnies

Here are some more diet, exercise and fitness funnies from around the web.

 

Mark Twain said, “Ride a bicycle. You will not regret it, if you live.

Have a great weekend!

Tony

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Healthy eating may reduce risk of dementia – AAIC Conference

Because of the Alzheimer’s Disease and dementia in my family, I have been an avid student of ways to protect myself as I age. Check out my Page – Important facts about your brain (and exercise benefits) for more. Regarding our general physical health I know that diet contributes about 70 percent and exercise 30 percent. It turns out that diet also provides important elements of brain health, too.

Results from four large population-based studies support a connection between good dietary practices and better cognition in old age. Study results were reported at the 2017 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC 2017) in London.

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A group of U.S. scientists found that, among nearly 6,000 older adults in the Health and Retirement Study, those who consistently followed diets long known to contribute to cardiovascular health were also more likely to maintain strong cognitive function in old age. They found that sticking to the specially designed MIND diet and Mediterranean diet was associated with 30 to 35 percent lower risk of cognitive impairment in healthy older adults. In fact, the investigators discovered that those with healthier diets exhibited meaningful preservation of cognitive function.

  • The Mediterranean and DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets were originally developed or codified to help improve cardiovascular health.
  • A hybrid of these diets, called the Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay, or MIND diet, is gaining attention for its potential positive effects on preserving cognitive function and reducing dementia risk in older individuals. A 2015 study found that individuals adhering to this diet exhibited less cognitive decline as they aged (Morris et al. Alzheimer’s Dement. 2015; 11:1015-22).

Other diet-related studies reported at AAIC 2017 included:

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4 Ways to eat your way to lower cholesterol – Harvard

Following is one of those helpful email I get from Harvard from time to time. I thought you might find it interesting.

Many people can reduce cholesterol levels simply by changing what they eat. For example, if you are a fan of cheeseburgers, eating less meat (and leaner cuts) and more vegetables, fruits, and whole grains can lower your total cholesterol by 25% or more. Cutting back on saturated fat (found in meat and dairy products) and trans fat (partially hydrogenated oils) can reduce cholesterol by 5% to 10%.

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Here are four steps for using your diet to lower your cholesterol.

Stick with unsaturated fats and avoid saturated and trans fats. Most vegetable fats (oils) are made up of unsaturated fats that are healthy for your heart. Foods that contain healthy fats include oily fish, nuts, seeds, and some vegetables. At the same time, limit your intake of foods high in saturated fat, which is found in many meat and dairy products, and stay away from trans fats. These include any foods made with “partially hydrogenated vegetable oils.”

Get more soluble fiber. Eat more soluble fiber, such as that found in oatmeal and fruits. This type of fiber can lower blood cholesterol levels when eaten as part of a healthy-fat diet. Continue reading

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The excellence of Tom Brady

I wrote this two years ago just ahead of the Super Bowl. Thought it was worth revisiting ahead of this year’s big game.

Tony

One Regular Guy Writing about Food, Exercise and Living Past 100

I write about diet, exercise and living longer. New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady is playing in the Super Bowl tomorrow. What’s the connection?

While I am big fan of the NFL and can’t wait for tomorrow’s game, I am writing about Tom Brady for totally other reasons. On January 16, I ran across the article Tom Brady Cannot Stop by Mark Leibovich in the New York Times Magazine. The piece offers some worthwhile insights into the charismatic character that is Tom Brady so often written about in broad strokes resulting in sketchy two dimensional pictures. Leibovitch accomplished much more than that.

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While I admired Brady’s excellence on the field and his wonderful apparently totally successful life, Super Bowl winner, multimillionaire, happily married to a supermodel, etc., I had no clear idea about him as a human being.

Mark Leibovich fixed that. The entire idea about this blog is…

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Hodgepodge of health

Some fitness, some funny, some diet … hodgepodge. Enjoy!

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Tony

 

 

 

 

 

 

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THE NUMBER ON THE SCALE JUST WON’T GO DOWN!

What I like most about this post is that it focuses you on your health and not just pounds. I know that when I struggled with my weight – for years – it was because all I looked at was the pounds. As soon as I lost five or ten I went back to my old ways. No wonder I never succeeded over the long term. You need to make a commitment to your health not just dropping a couple of pounds.

Tony

All About Healthy Choices

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Does this sound familiar?

“I’ve tried dieting, exercising, appetite suppressants and the number on the scale won’t go down!” “I’ve done everything POSSIBLE, so I guess I’ll have to live with this reality.”

HERE’S THE REAL REALITY!

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Most people did what they were WILLING TO DO under the terms they were WILLING TO DO IT. Without clearly understanding the mechanism of weight gain, they attempted to alter its outcome by throwing various “weight loss” ideas at the problem. This method  worked in the past, therefore, would surely work again. Unfortunately, as we age, it frequently doesn’t!

When patients came to me with specific health concerns, I didn’t simply reach into my bag of “experience” and “pull out” things that worked with other patients. I went through a thorough health history, examination and diagnostic testing (which might have included blood work, MRI’s, ultrasounds, CT scans, evoked potential…

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Saying ‘yes’ to kale, more successful than ‘no’ to cake – Baylor Study

Back more than six years ago, the primary focus of this blog was weight loss pure and simple. In the course of writing about weight loss, I found myself opening up to the concept of good health and long life and the idea of simply losing weight diminished in value. In my mind the positive aim of healthy living easily trumped the negative and short range goal of simply dropping some unwanted pounds. Now, it seems that Baylor University  has determined that looking on the positive side worked far better than the avoidance, or negative side in their studies.

Baylor reported that, many diet plans are doomed from the start.

The reason? Dieters tend to adopt the wrong strategies, often planning to ditch their favorite foods and replace them with less-desirable options, according to new research from Baylor University’s Hankamer School of Business.

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Conversely, successful dieters focus on adding healthy foods – foods that they actually like, said Meredith David, Ph.D., assistant professor of marketing at Baylor. She is the lead author on the study, “Saying ‘No’ to Cake or ‘Yes’ to Kale: Approach and Avoidance Strategies in Pursuit of Health Goals,” published in the journal Psychology & Marketing. Continue reading

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Calcium and your health – Infographic

I think calcium is one of the under-appreciated minerals around.

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To read further on bone health and calcium, check out:

Calcium – The key to strong bones

Bad to the bone – WebMD

Strength training builds more than muscles – Harvard

Tony

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What About Thomas Edison’s “Doctor of the Future” Quote?

In case you are unfamiliar with the Edison quote, I am reproducing it here visually:

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I just ran across this quote tonight and, frankly, it blew my mind. Edison died in 1931. How about that for a forward-looking idea?

The whole purpose of this blog is to live healthy through diet and exercise and to use as little as possible drugs and unnatural substances in our systems.

In reading up on that quote, it turns out that chiropractors have used it to bolster their practice over the years. I have no quarrel with this. I have used chiropractors on and off for years for skeletal and muscular matters. They worked.

But, did Edison really say it?

I checked with Snopes, “the definitive Internet reference source for urban legends, folklore, myths, rumors, and misinformation.”

Here is some of what Snopes had to say:

“…we turned up several newspaper articles from late 1902 and early 1903 that reprinted Edison’s predictions for the upcoming year. Those predictions included some comments from him about the future of medicine, a portion of which incorporated the “doctor of the future” statement now attributed to him:

“Nineteen hundred and three will bring great advances in surgery, in the study of bacteria, in the knowledge of the cause and prevention of disease. Medicine is played out. Every new discovery of bacteria shows us all the more convincingly that we have been wrong and that the million tons of stuff we have taken was all useless.

The doctor of the future will give no medicine, but will instruct his patient in the care of the human frame, in diet and in the cause and prevention of disease….”

You can read the entire Snopes item by clicking on the link where I first mentioned them.

I am thrilled to learn that the visionary Thomas Edison pointed in the same direction that I have been aiming for the past six years. Granted his statement was made before the development of antibiotics and many of the effective drugs we find in our medicine cabinets today.

Nonetheless, I am thinking of the needless suffering and deaths resulting from smoking, overeating and neglect of our need to exercise our bodies. Think how much healthcare costs would decline if we just learned to take care of ourselves as Edison suggested. We need to quit trying to solve our careless health practices with pills. Remember, over 60% of us are overweight and more than 30% are obese, not to mention teenagers coming down with adult onset diabetes, all as a result of bad food choices.

Here is a quote from my Page on the harm of smoking,Tobacco use is the single largest cause of preventable cause of death in the United States. On average people who smoke die about 10 years sooner than non-smokers. The New England Journal of Medicine.”

I wish that quote from Edison would set off a light bulb in people’s heads and get them to managing their health better.

Tony

 

 

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Harvard on Dealing with Abdominal Fat

Belly fat is very bad. It can literally kill  you. I have a Page on it – What are the dangers of a big waistline? that contains a number of articles spelling out chapter and verse on its dangers.

Now comes Harvard Health Publications with more info on this weighty subject.

“Though the term might sound dated, “middle-age spread” is a greater concern than ever. As people go through their middle years, their proportion of fat to body weight tends to increase — more so in women than men. Extra pounds tend to park themselves around the midsection.

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“At one time, we might have accepted these changes as an inevitable fact of aging. But we’ve now been put on notice that as our waistlines grow, so do our health risks. Abdominal, or visceral fat is of particular concern because it’s a key player in a variety of health problems — much more so than subcutaneous fat, the kind you can grasp with your hand. Visceral fat, on the other hand, lies out of reach, deep within the abdominal cavity, where it pads the spaces between our abdominal organs.

“Visceral fat has been linked to metabolic disturbances and increased risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. In women, it is also associated with breast cancer and the need for gallbladder surgery.
Are you pear-shaped or apple-shaped? Continue reading

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Eventually Something Will Give

I like this simple analogy. If folks were as scrupulous about maintaining their bodies as they are about their cars, we might not have the horrible healthcare situation we do with 60 per cent overweight, 30 per cent obese and teenagers coming down with adult onset diabetes.

Check out my post – What Have You Done For Me Lately? – for more details.

Eat less; move more; live longer.

Tony

Dream Big, Dream Often

Eventually something will give.  I often think about this when I see a car that is obviously being neglected.  Smoking out the tail pipe, bald tires and in need of a tune up.  Why does the owner continue to drive their car into the ground?  Do they realize that the short-term cost of maintenance far outweighs the devastation of long-term neglect?  Also, driving the car in a neglected state can put their life and families’ lives in danger.

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Obviously they have never considered these dangers, because it makes no sense to be aware of the danger, yet continue to subject their families to the risk.

And so it is with our health.  We only have one body in which we live.  I am not saying to completely eliminate donuts and lattes.  After all I have been very honest about my love affair with Burger King.  What I am saying is…

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The Science of Weight Loss – Infographic

Although this says “weight loss” in the headline, the first illustration makes clear that integrating exercise and intelligent eating – lifestyle change – is the most effective method. If you get yourself into living a healthy life you won’t have to even think about weight loss.

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