Some vintage ads and your health

I stumbled across these old ads in my web wanderings and thought they might amuse you. We had some really goofy ideas a few years back.

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Are your donuts fortified with at least 25 units of B Vitamins?

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Nothing like a doctor’s recommendation to guide your cigarette smoking.

 

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It wasn’t that long ago that cigarettes permeated our lives.

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An energetic looking Tootsie Roll ad.

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No sense eating broccoli plain when  you can drown it in Velveeta.

Tony

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How to make exercise resolutions stick – The Gov

I am pretty much a believer that the words, “I’m from the government and I’m here to help,” are contradictory.  However, every once in a while when it comes to the subject of health, government agencies can prove helpful. I think one of the keys to living a long and healthy life is to exercise regularly.

Following are suggestions from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases NIDDK).

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This is me riding my bike, an exercise that I love. If you find one you will look forward to doing it and very likely continue.

Continue reading

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Seniors need to get out of that comfort zone – NYT

I have written several posts on why people are discounting in the mainstream media regarding their second rate and slanted coverage of Donald Trump and the recent election. However, I want to point out that this piece from the New York Times is superb reporting. So, the grey lady lives on.

The article was How to become a Superager by Lisa Feldman Barrett. She is the author of the forthcoming “How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain.”

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She asks, “Why do some older people remain mentally nimble while others decline? “Superagers” (a term coined by the neurologist Marsel Mesulam) are those whose memory and attention isn’t merely above average for their age, but is actually on par with healthy, active 25-year-olds. ”

In providing the answer, she gets into some labyrinthine details on how the brain functions. If you want to go there just click on the link to the article and enjoy. Continue reading

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Filed under aging, aging brain, brain exercise, Exercise, exercise and brain health, exercise benefits, New York Times

Get the jump on Alzheimer’s and dementia – Rush

Regular readers know that because I have lost three family members to Alzheimer’s and dementia I have a serious interest in keeping myself safe. And, by extension, you. This isn’t just for seniors.

Rush Medical Center has some very  useful suggestions on the subject.

Do you have the power to prevent Alzheimer’s disease? Although some risk factors — age and family history — are beyond your control, increasing evidence from research indicates that you aren’t helpless.

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Researchers from the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center and around the world have found that certain lifestyle choices can protect your brain against the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.

Incorporate the following activities into your life, and your brain could reap the benefits Continue reading

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Filed under aging, aging brain, brain, brain function, brain health, exercise and brain health, Healthy brain

Mayo Clinic on food fraud – Do you know what you are eating?

Here’s a subject on which I must confess almost total ignorance. The Mayo Clinic blog, however, enumerates a disturbing situation.

Despite of all kinds of regulations and inspections, food fraud exists. Food fraud can defined as the intentional addition of improper or inferior ingredients to a food, often for economic gain.

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Not all food frauds are as easy to spot as this one.

Food fraud has been around throughout history. Highly sought after spices were with filled with ground up seeds; milk was been diluted with water and chalk. The medical journal “The Lancet” reported in 1851 that swindlers were selling tea that was made from elm, oak and beech leaves, and contaminated with lead. Continue reading

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STRESS ISN’T REALLY THAT DANGEROUS; IS IT? — All About Healthy Choices

“My job creates so much stress.” “My marriage is so stressful.” “The holidays are always a stressful time of year.” We hear the word “STRESS” so often, we are almost immune to the REAL HARM it often produces. It is NOT just a NOUN or VERB. It is an EMOTION that causes SERIOUS HEALTH COMPLICATIONS […]

via STRESS ISN’T REALLY THAT DANGEROUS; IS IT? — All About Healthy Choices

After reading this superb explanation of the damage stress wreaks on your body, please check out my post – Some super tools for handling stress. There is an answer for it.

Tony

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Guys – Get that check up

I started writing this blog for guys nearly seven years ago. The idea was that women did a great job of keeping track of their health; men, not so much. Over the course of writing it, I have found that more than half of my readers are women who are paying attention to their  health, so the focus shifted from guys to simply good health and living past 100. But, according to this little infographic, guys still don’t do a very good job. With 34% of men over age 20 overweight or obese, guys need to wake up.

I hope this little Men’s Health 101 from Texas A&M University Health Science Center gives you a wake up call.

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Tony

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Filed under blood pressure, medical check ups, men's health, overweight, Weight, weight loss

First bike ride of 2017

The temp in Chicago this morning ranged between 28 and 32F. I rode 15 miles (around an hour) in my first ride of the year. Below is a picture of a peloton of fellow riders (you may have to squint to see them) heading south along the Lakefront bike path. I hope you can see their colorful cycling outfits. The cars behind them are northbound on Lake Shore Drive. IMG_1276 (2).jpg As you can see from the picture, it was a wonderful clear crisp day. Thankfully there was little wind in the Windy City this morning.

Below you can see from the brilliant colors how clear the light was. This is a view looking north from approximately 100 yards away from where I live.

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For the year 2016, I managed around 5300 miles. This is slightly down from recent years, but not too shabby for a 76 year old. I seem to have been busier in 2016 for some reason. I did travel to Las Vegas four times and Reno once, so there was no bike riding in those 25 odd days.

I consider myself very fortunate to live near the Lakefront bike path. When I ride before sunrise I get some breathtaking views of the sun coming up over Lake Michigan. Below is a recent shot taken just before the sun came up. That’s world famous Navy Pier with its Ferris wheel. While sunrises can be magnificent, I think the electric lights in this picture look stunning. I am guessing the sun came up about 20 minutes after I shot this.IMG_1008.jpg

I also get some wonderful views of cloud formations. Below shows an impending storm coming in from the southwest. That’s the bike path in the foreground looking south.

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Everyone knows what selfies are, right? Well, below is my version – a shadow selfie. These angles are possible just after the sun comes up. This is me in front of the stairs leading to Lake Shore Drive. You can’t see it, but Buckingham Fountain is across Lake Shore Drive just beyond these steps.

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Below is a runner just before sunrise.

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Finally, here is a picture taken on the same morning about 15 minutes later as the sun had risen further. Again, you can see the Navy Pier Ferris wheel in the background. You can see a silhouette of a runner. For some reason few of the runners I see in the morning dark bother to wear any lights or reflective items. IMG_0214.jpg

I consider myself most fortunate that I have a resource like the lakefront bike path right outside my door. I think you can see from these shots that my morning ride refreshes my soul as well as my body.

Tony

 

 

 

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Those 2017 New Year’s Resolutions

I thought this survey of Fitbit users from last year was a good place to start. I  have never used a Fitbit, but I love my Apple Watch and recommend using a wearable to help you focus on your health daily. I like that 79% said their Fitbit tracker helped them to reach their daily step goal. Check it out.

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Couldn’t resist a chance to run this picture of a bike – parked and ready to ride.

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As you can see on my Apple Watch face the top ring shows how many calories I have burned, the yellow ring how many minutes I exercised and the green ring how many times I have stood up from sitting. The rings fill in throughout the day as I complete my exercise.

I hope you and your loved ones have your best year ever in 2017!

Tony

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Happy New Year!

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Don’t you agree that doing it in French adds a level of panache?

 

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Wishing you and yours a Wonder-ful New Year!

Tony

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Why people are discounting what they read in mainstream media

I don’t plan to do a lot of writing about politics or the mainstream media, but as a former member of it, I am appalled at the quality of the information the media is attempting to shove down the public’s throat.  I wrote about CNBC Chief Washington Correspondent, John Harwood previously.

A headline in the Washington Post Opinion page by stated  Trump is being handed a great economy. What happens when it goes south? As if the economy declining after the new president takes office is a foregone conclusion.

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Here are some of the details I am aware of on the present state of the economy. I bet you know others from your own experience …

Lowest labor participation rate since 1970s which makes the current unemployment rate much higher than is being reported

Almost 95 million Americans have left the labor force

Many Americans forced to work two part time jobs to make ends meet

In a Treasury Department poll of 50,000 people, less than half said they could raise $400 cash in a week if needed for an emergency

Worst recovery since the 1940s

Lowest home ownership rate in 51  years.

Almost 13 million MORE Americans on food stamps than when Obama was elected

Over 43 million Americans living in poverty

One in 5 families without someone in the workforce

Obama put the country into more debt than all previous presidents combined

Suicide rate among middle aged men in the Rust Belt is up

40 % of student debt is in arrears – $1.3 trillion

This is what the Washington Post calls a great economy. How much farther south can this economy go? Is it any wonder that the mainstream media is losing credibility and readership?

As a matter of fact, the Dow Jones Industrial average gained around 2400 points this year, of which 1400 came after the November 8 Presidential Election. So, clearly, investors feel differently than the Washington Post about the future prospects for the economy.

Happy New Year!

Tony

 

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Filed under mainstream media, politics, Washington Post

Use Vitamin C for a healthy immune system

It’s that time of year again, not just holiday season, but cold season. And, for many of us, it’s vitamin C season. As a person just getting over his Christmas cold, I was interested to learn more about vitamin C. Turns out it is a very powerful force for good health.

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Here’s what Marisa Moore, MBA, RDN, LD from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics as to say about it.

“Vitamin C, or ascorbic acid, is a water-soluble vitamin well known for its role in supporting a healthy immune system. Because your body cannot make vitamin C, it must come from the foods you eat every day. Continue reading

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Bad habits that can hurt your brain – WebMD

I  write often about the benefits the brain gets from exercise and how we should make regular exercise a priority as much for our mental health as physical. That is a good positive target.

It turns out that WebMD also has some excellent suggestions for keeping our brains clicking on all cylinders, but they approach from the negative side. Not doing harmful things is also an important consideration in getting to old age with a fully functional brain.

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Here is their list of bad habits:

Missing out on sleep. WebMD notes, “… lack of sleep may be a cause of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease. It’s best to have regular sleeping hours. If you have trouble with sleep, avoid alcohol, caffeine, and electronics in the evening, and start a soothing bedtime ritual.”

I would like to interject here that my Page on How important is a good night’s sleep could be worth checking into. Continue reading

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Study shows Vitamin E and Selenium don’t cut colon cancer risk

As one of the former big proponents of Vitamin E, I was disappointed to learn that it does not have all of the healthy impacts I had heard. I just ran across this information that came out a few days ago.

Eight years ago, results from a landmark cancer prevention trial run by SWOG, a National Cancer Institute supported organization, showed that a daily dose of vitamin E and selenium did not prevent prostate cancer. In fact, the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) showed that vitamin E supplementation increased the risk of prostate cancer in healthy men.

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Nuts and avocados are natural sources of Vitamin E

Now, a SWOG review of ancillary SELECT results definitively shows that these two antioxidants also don’t prevent colorectal adenomas – polyps that are the premalignant precursors to most colorectal cancers. Results are published in Cancer Prevention Research.

“The message to the public is this: Vitamin E and selenium will not prevent colorectal adenomas, which are surrogates for colorectal cancer,” said Dr. Peter Lance, lead author of the journal article and deputy director of the University of Arizona Cancer Center. “We have no evidence that these supplements work to prevent cancer.”

Despite the billions spent in the United States each year on vitamin supplements, there is scant evidence they prevent cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute, which funds SWOG through its National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), results from nine randomized trials did not provide evidence that antioxidant supplements are beneficial in primary cancer prevention. An in-depth review conducted for the United States Preventive Services Task Force likewise found no clear evidence of benefit. Continue reading

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Filed under colon, colon cancer, selenium, Vitamin E

Some midweek holiday food funnies …

The week between Christmas and New Year’s is always a limbo period. It’s shortened by the holidays and we are preoccupied by the social turmoil. So, here are some humorous items on holiday fare.

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Happy holidays!

Tony

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Filed under holiday eating, holiday weight gain

Female doctors may be better – Harvard

About five years ago, I switched to a female doctor and I think she is great. I dropped the male doctor who had been treating me because I got the feeling he didn’t really care about me. In fact, sometimes he gave me the impression that I was a bother. Obviously, my experience is totally anecdotal and may have no relevance to anyone else. After all, for years there were only male doctors and that worked fine.  Regarding my doctor, I think that she genuinely cares about my well being and keeping it up is a priority with her. I trust her and like confiding in her. I did not feel that way with the man who had been treating me.

Here is the latest from Harvard.

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Elderly hospitalized patients treated by female physicians are less likely to die within 30 days of admission, or to be readmitted within 30 days of discharge, than those cared for by male physicians, according to a new study led by researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. It is the first research to document differences in how male and female physicians treat patients result in different outcomes for hospitalized patients in the U.S. Continue reading

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