Tag Archives: lung cancer

What happens after you quit smoking: A timeline

As regular readers know, I feel strongly that smoking is an unmitigated blight on our lives. We lose over 170,000 people to it every year – just in lung cancer alone – totally preventable. To be honest, I am surprised that anyone who can read would choose to be a smoker. Nonetheless, it is so. I have a Page on it – How many ways does smoking harm you?   which I recommend you check out after reading this.

I am reproducing what follows from Medical News Today because I like the way they spell out positive aspects of ceasing smoking. Jenna Fletcher wrote it.

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Cigarette smoking is one of the leading causes of preventable death in the United States. Despite this, some smokers find quitting daunting. They think it will take a very long time before seeing improvements in their health and well-being.

However, the timeline for seeing real benefits to quitting smoking is much faster than most people realize. Health benefits begin in as little as an hour after the last cigarette and continue to improve. Continue reading

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Filed under blood pressure, cholesterol, coronary heart disease, impact of quitting smoking, smoking, Smoking dangers

Heavy Smokers Should Get CT Scans

Regular readers know I am strongly opposed to smoking. You can check out my Page How bad is smoking at the top for all the reasons in detail. But, this is still a free country and you can do what you want, So, I thought it wise to pass on the words of Rob Logan, Ph.D. Director of the U.S. National library of Medicine.

Young woman smoking cigarette

“The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends annual computer tomography (or CT) screening for smokers between age 55-80, who currently smoke or have smoked an average of a pack of cigarettes a day for 30 years. Low dose CT scans also are recommended for adults between age 55-80, who smoked an average of a pack of cigarettes a day for 30 years — and quit within the past 15 years.

“Michael LeFevre M.D., the Task Force’s co-vice chair, told the Wall Street Journal (after the recommendations’ release) the recommended screening could prevent as many as 20,000 lung cancer deaths annually. Dr. LeFevre told Health Day: ‘That’s a lot of people, and we feel it’s worth it, but there still will be a lot more people dying from lung cancer. That’s why the most important way to prevent lung cancer will continue to be to convince smokers to quit.'”

“The Task Force’s report notes about 160,000 Americans die from lung cancer annually and about 230,000 new cases are diagnosed each year. Lung cancer is the third most common and deadliest of all cancers and impacts both men and women. The Task Force’s report explains about 37 percent of adults are current or former smokers.”

Anecdotally, my father smoked cigarettes all his life and quit at age 55. He died of lung cancer at age 76. It seems the doctor’s recommendation might have been helpful in his case.

Tony

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Filed under aging, health, healthy living, smoking, The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

Fresh Bad News for Smokers

“On average people who smoke die about 10 years sooner than non-smokers. The New England Journal of Medicine.

“Smoking triples the risk for cataracts and is also a risk factor for macular degeneration and its response to treatment. Dr. Nicholas Volpe, Tarry Professor and Chairman Department of Opthalmology Feinberg School of Medicine Northwestern University

“The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2012 (latest year with statistics) about 173,200 cancer deaths will be caused by tobacco use. The overall survival rate for those with lung cancer, sadly, remains at around 15%,” so starts my Page – How bad is Smoking.

smoking

But, “nearly half a million people will die from smoking-related diseases this year. Each day, more than 3,200 youths smoke their first cigarette. New products such as e-cigarettes, with effects that aren’t yet understood, complicate public health messages. And if current trends continue unabated, 5.6 million of today’s children and teens will go on to die prematurely during adulthood because of smoking,” the Associated Press said.

The Surgeon General released a fresh report on Friday enumerating the above and more dire consequences that smokers are exposing themselves to.

“Remarkably, the report adds more entries to the official list of smoking-caused diseases, including Type 2 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, erectile dysfunction, the macular degeneration that can blind older adults, two additional cancers – liver and colorectal – and cleft palate birth defects.”

If you are a smoker please consider stopping. If you know a smoker help them to get off this deadly habit.

Tony

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Filed under cancer, diabetes, lung cancer, smoking

How Does Smoking Affect You?

I wanted to have a record of this on the blog because I am always amazed at the number of seemingly intelligent people I see who are still puffing away. So, for the record, The Center For Disease Control offers the following results of smoking:

Smoking damages nearly every organ of the body. Smoking causes many diseases and reduces the health of smokers in general.

Smoking causes death.
• The adverse health effects from cigarette smoking account for an estimated 443,000 deaths, or nearly one of every five deaths, each year in the United States.
• More deaths are caused each year by tobacco use than by all deaths from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), illegal drug use, alcohol use, motor vehicle injuries, suicides, and murders combined.
• Smoking causes an estimated 90% of all lung cancer deaths in men and 80% of all lung cancer deaths in women.
• An estimated 90% of all deaths from chronic obstructive lung disease are caused by smoking.

Look at all the good things that happen as soon as you stop smoking.

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Smoking Increases Health Risks
Compared with nonsmokers, smoking is estimated to increase the risk of—
• coronary heart disease by 2 to 4 times
• stroke by 2 to 4 times,
• men developing lung cancer by 23 times
• women developing lung cancer by 13 times
• dying from chronic obstructive lung diseases (such as chronic bronchitis and emphysema) by 12 to 13 times.
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