Tag Archives: whole grain bread

Surprising answer to – Is white bread, or whole wheat bread healthier?

Despite many studies looking at which bread is the healthiest, it is still not clear what effect bread and differences among bread types have on clinically relevant parameters and on the microbiome. In the journal Cell Metabolism, Weizmann Institute researchers report the results of a comprehensive, randomized trial in 20 healthy subjects comparing differences in how processed white bread and artisanal whole wheat sourdough affect the body.

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Surprisingly, the investigators found the bread itself didn’t greatly affect the participants and that different people reacted differently to the bread. The research team then devised an algorithm to help predict how individuals may respond to the bread in their diets.

 

All of the participants in the study normally consumed about 10% of their calories from bread. Half were assigned to consume an increased amount of processed, packaged white bread for a week – around 25% of their calories – and half to consume an increased amount of whole wheat sourdough, which was baked especially for the study and delivered fresh to the participants. After a 2-week period without bread, the diets for the two groups were reversed.

Before the study and throughout the time it was ongoing, many health effects were monitored. These included wakeup glucose levels; levels of the essential minerals calcium, iron, and magnesium; fat and cholesterol levels; kidney and liver enzymes; and several markers for inflammation and tissue damage. The investigators also measured the makeup of the participants’ microbiomes before, during, and after the study.

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Eating whole grains increases metabolism and calorie loss – Study

A new study suggests that substituting whole grains for refined grains in the diet increases calorie loss by reducing calories retained during digestion and speeding up metabolism. This research is published in tandem with a study on the effect of whole grains on gut microbiota. Both studies are published  in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Epidemiology studies have suggested health benefits of whole grains and high dietary fiber intake, including for glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. There has been controversy, however, about whether whole grains and fiber are beneficial for weight regulation, partially because there hasn’t been data from controlled metabolic studies. This new study provided food to participants for eight weeks and may help explain how whole grain consumption is beneficial for weight management.

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Filed under calorie counting, calories, refined flour, whole grain, whole grains

What Are Some Tips For Eating Out?

I recently reblogged a post on eating healthy while traveling. What about the local traveling we all do when we decide to eat out? That can be just a trying an experience when it comes to eating healthy.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has some worthwhile ideas.

5 Best Kansas City Restaurants(1)

They suggest making physical activity an integral part of dining out. If you walk from home or office, you can get your meal and some minutes of physical activity and avoid parking hassles in the bargain. Walking with family or friends gives you time to chat while a stroll after dinner helps digestion.

The all important concept of portion size looms large on The Academy’s radar.

“Becoming sensible about serving sizes is an important way to maintain a healthy weight and it’s good for your wallet too.
• Instead of a large entrée, order an appetizer and a leafy green salad or choose two appetizers for a meal.
• Start with a small serving like a cup of soup, a junior burger or a small order of fries. If you are still hungry, order something else.
• Indulge your inner child: Order a kid’s meal at a fast-food restaurant. Many now offer a choice of low-fat milk and fruits or vegetables instead of fries.
• Savor your steak twice as much. Eat half at the restaurant, then take the other half home to enjoy sliced onto a green salad or as a sandwich on whole-grain bread.
• Ask for a to-go box as soon as your meal is served. Put half your food into the container for a second meal. That’s two meals for the price of one.
• Share from start to finish. Order one appetizer for the whole table and then order one dessert with multiple forks. Sometimes, just a bite or two is perfect.
• Share an entrée. You can ask your server to split the meal in the kitchen or divide it up yourselves at the table.”

There is nothing inherently wrong about eating out, you  just need to be extra careful about ordering. The foregoing guidelines can help you.

Tony

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Filed under eating out, health, healthy eating, healthy living, portion control, portion size, Weight

What Are the Best and Worst Sandwiches to Order from Panera Bread?

You can’t go wrong eating out if you stick with chicken and turkey, right? Just beware of the big old burger.

Not so fast, says WebMD.

Panera's Signature Chicken on Artisan French Bread

Panera’s Signature Chicken on Artisan French Bread

Avoid like the plague Panera’s Signature Chicken on Artisan French Bread. It “contains 830 calories, 37 g fat, 12 g saturated fat, and 2,180 mg of sodium.  That’s the daily Sodium limit for healthy adults. The special sauce, bacon, and cheddar help turn chicken, a lean type of protein, into a calorie bomb. Unfortunately,  many of the hot panini, signature, and café sandwiches hit the 700-900 calorie range,” WebMD says.

 Panera's Smoked Turkey on Whole Grain Bread

Panera’s Smoked Turkey on Whole Grain Bread

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Filed under arterial plaque, burgers, calories, chicken, fast food, obesity, Panera Bread, Panera Chicken Sandwich, Panera Smoked Turkey, portion control, portion size, salt, saturated fat, sodium, turkey, Weight

What are the Worst Junk Foods?

Pizza claims two spots by itself, according to RealAge.

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“Cheese and pizza are the No. 1 and No. 2 sources of artery-clogging saturated fat in the American diet. One slice of extra-cheesy pizza can contain as much as two-thirds of your daily saturated fat limit. Nutrition expert Bonnie Taub-Dix, MA, RD, CDN, author of Read It Before You Eat It, offers these tips to lighten up your pizza: Top it with veggies instead of pepperoni and sausage. While you’re at it, say “no” to breadsticks and “yes” to a side salad, and you’re on the way to preventing heart disease,” RealAge reported.

I thought those were some very good suggestions when ordering from the pizzeria regarding topping it with veggies instead of pepperoni and/or sausage. By all means dodge the breadsticks. Suggestions like that can take several hundred calories off the total, not to mention cutting down on the bad fats.

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Filed under calories, diabetes, heart, heart disease, heart problems, pizza, portion size, submarine sandwich, winter