Tag Archives: webmd

Tips on sharpening your brain – WebMD

I write about exercise almost daily and about the brain nearly as often, but I think they really need to be tied together for the best understanding. Also, because we all want to live past 100, we certainly want the old cabeza to fully functional.

WebMD has a nice 12 part slide show  called Tips to stay smart, sharp and focused. If you want to experience the entire show, just click the link above. I am have picked out a few examples for the folks too lazy busy to do the whole thing right now.

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Number one is superb: USE YOUR BRAIN  “It’s true: Use it or lose it. Stretching your brain keeps your mind sharp. People who are more active in mentally challenging activities are more likely to stay sharp. Try these:
•    Read a book.
•    Go to a lecture.
•    Listen to the radio.
•    Play a game.
•    Visit a museum.
•    Learn a second language.”
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Filed under aging brain, brain, brain exercise, brain function, brain health

Boning up on bones – WebMD

As much as folks seem to know and care about the fat and the muscles in their body, they remain pretty ignorant about their bones. This is a shame because in the case of the skeleton you don’t know can hurt you.

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WebMD has thoughtfully provided a test – Myths and facts about your bones to get you up to speed on the subject.

Herewith are a couple of questions that will hopefully encourage you to click on the link and take the entire test yourself.

Number one:

When do bones stop growing?

a  They don’t

b  Puberty

c  Late 20s

I’m not going to spoil your fun by giving you the correct answer.
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How to Relieve Osteoarthritis Pain – WebMD

Regular readers know that I am an osteoarthritis (OA) sufferer, probably for at least 15 years. I have it in my hands, the base of each thumb. So it hurts me to turn a key, unbutton a shirt or pretty much any grasping motion. I read about OA whenever I can. I try new methods of pain relief and have chronicled many of them in these pages. Just search the term a r t h r i t i s on the right to check them out.

Now comes WebMD with a quiz on how to relieve OA pain. With my experience you might guess that I would do very well on such a quiz. You (and I) would be wrong. I only got 10 out of 17 answers right. So, there is always room for improvement, even for a long time OA sufferer who writes a blog a good health.

I am not going to spoil your fun and give you the answers, but I will share a couple of questions and you can see how well you do.

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The first question: Eating oranges and grapefruit triggers osteoarthritis pain. True or false?

Here is a good one: Which is best for relieving osteoarthritis pain? Heat; Ice; Heat or ice; Alternating between them.

How much extra stress does each pound of weight put on your hips? Twice as much; Three times; Six times; Eight times. If you are overweight, it is worth taking the quiz just to find out the answer. Good luck!

Please feel free to share your thoughts on this.

Tony

 

 

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Filed under osteoarthritis, osteoarthritis pain, Pain relief

Fun WebMD Brain Quiz

You guys know that I have spent a lot of time reading and writing about the brain. I hope you have gotten some worthwhile info out of that over the past few  years.

Now comes WebMD with a cool quiz on the brain. I suggest that you take it. I promise you will learn something. I know I did.

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Here is a sample question:

Your brain can juggle more than two conscious tasks at once:

( ) True

( ) False

I am not going to spoil your fun by telling you the correct answer.

If your interest is piqued by the test and you want to know more about that incredible organ in your head, check out my Page – Important Facts About Your Brain for lots more info.

Tony

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The Sweet Truth About Chocolate

In view of Valentine’s Day tomorrow and tons of chocolate being consumed in honor of it, I thought it might be useful to get a taste of chocolate’s impact on our health.

Medical News Today says, “Throughout the years, chocolate has been on the end of a lot of bad press because of its fat content, and its consumption has been associated with acne, obesity, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease and diabetes.

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“However, ‘the recent discovery of biologically active phenolic compounds in cocoa has changed this perception and stimulated research on its effects in aging, oxidative stress, blood pressure regulation, and atherosclerosis. Today, chocolate is lauded for its tremendous antioxidant potential.’
The potential benefits of eating chocolate may include:
▪    lowering cholesterol levels
▪    preventing cognitive decline
▪    reducing the risk of cardiovascular problems. Continue reading

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Some Supplements to Ease Arthritis Pain – WebMD

Regular readers know that I have suffered from severe arthritis in both of my hands. I have tried a number of remedies to ease the pain over the years. Some help to a greater or lesser extent. You can type arthritis into the search box at the right and explore a number of them.

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Here is what WebMD suggests:

Arthritis Pain
“If you have any type of arthritis, you should keep up with the treatments your doctor recommends. If you want to add a supplement, you might consider:

“SAM-e. This is a man-made version of a chemical that your body makes. Early research suggests it may relieve arthritis symptoms as well as some medications do. You can take it in capsule form, 600-1,200 milligrams per day, divided into three doses. SAM-e is also what is called ‘poor man’s prozac.’ You can take it to mellow out if you are stressed. However, I have some much more salubrious suggestions for handling stress in the blog. Search either s t r e s s or relaxation to read them.

“Glucosamine/chondroitin. If your osteoarthritis is moderate or severe, glucosamine and chondroitin may help with pain. But the research is mixed. So ask your doctor if it’s OK for you and, if so, what dosage you should take.

“Boswellia. Studies suggest this tree resin can reduce osteoarthritis pain. It may also help with rheumatoid arthritis. You can take boswellia as a capsule or tablet, up to 900 milligrams per day.

“Capsaicin. Capsaicin, which gives chili peppers their fiery kick, may temporarily ease arthritis pain. It comes in a skin cream, gel, or patch. Apply it three times a day, but stop using it if it irritates your skin.

“Other natural aids. Avocado-soybean oil blend, cat’s claw, fish oil, gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), and ginger may also help with arthritis pain.”

Although WebMD didn’t mention it, I use mustard seed oil that I bought from Amazon. Just rub it on the afflicted joint liberally. It is also good for reducing swelling.

One last suggestion from me: the holy grail as far as I am concerned is exercise. A doctor suggested I take up knitting for my hand arthritis. I have had friends in similar circumstances who got the same advice. Those Chinese exercise balls work well, too. You need to  use the whole hand to roll them around. The old adage use it or lose it operates here. You need movement in the affected joint for mobility and lubrication.

Good luck!

Tony

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5 Simple Steps to a Good Night’s Sleep – Harvard

As regular readers know, I feel strongly about the importance of a good night’s sleep. It isn’t a luxury, it is a necessity for a healthy life. To understand this better, please check out my Page – How Important is a Good Night’s Sleep.

Here is what Harvard had to say on the subject, “Sleep shortfalls can lead to a range of health problems, from being more likely to catch a cold or gain weight to increased risk of developing heart disease or diabetes.

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While these sleep tips are aimed at women, they apply equally to men.

“For optimum health and function, the average adult should get seven to nine hours of sleep every night. But more than 60% of women regularly fall short of that goal.

“This may be due to insomnia or another underlying condition that may require medical attention. But most women with a sleep debt run it up by burning the candle at both ends — consistently failing to get to bed on time or stay there long enough.

“Don’t worry about repaying the old sleep debt. Just make sure you start getting enough sleep from this point forward — starting tonight. Getting enough sleep is just as important as eating a healthy diet and getting regular exercise. (My emphasis)

Tips for getting the rest you need:

1     Create a sleep sanctuary. Reserve your bedroom for sleep and intimacy. Keep it on the cool side. Banish the television, computer, smartphone or tablet, and other diversions from that space.
2     Nap only if necessary. Taking a nap at the peak of sleepiness in the afternoon can help to supplement hours missed at night. But naps can also interfere with your ability to sleep at night and throw your sleep schedule into disarray. If you need to nap, limit it to 20 to 30 minutes.
3     Avoid caffeine after noon, and go light on alcohol. Caffeine can stay in your body for up to 12 hours. Alcohol can act as a sedative, but it also disturbs sleep.
4     Get regular exercise, but not within three hours of bedtime. Exercise acts as a short-term stimulant.
5     Avoid backsliding into a new debt cycle. Try to go to bed and get up at the same time every day — at the very least, on weekdays. If need be, use weekends to make up for lost sleep.

For more things women can do to lead longer and healthier lives, you can order A Guide to Women’s Health: Fifty and Forward.

First of all, I think that these five tips are excellent but they also apply equally to both men and women. I am not sure why Harvard has chosen to single out women.

I know that men and women sleep differently. Web MD said, ““There’s no nationally representative data [on gender differences],” says Michael Twery, PhD, director of the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research, a division of the National Institutes of Health.

“Twery says that national health surveillance surveys have recently started to ask questions related to sleep. Such surveys will eventually help researchers break down responses along gender lines, potentially providing more insight into how men and women sleep — and sleep differently.

“Still, there are a few things that we do know now. According to Twery, women suffer from insomnia at two to three times the rate that men do. Men, on the other hand, are twice as likely to have their slumber spoiled by sleep apnea, a chronic condition characterized by brief episodes of restricted breathing.”

Tony

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Tips For Eating Healthy in Restaurants – WebMD

WebMD has a writeup on the Worst Restaurant Meals that is worth checking out.

Chicken is normally a healthy choice, but you need to pay attention to how it is prepared and what is served with it.

Chicken is normally a healthy choice, but you need to pay attention to how it is prepared and what is served with it.

Here are a few of the highlights:

Chicken is often a good alternative to red meats with their heavy fats, however, restaurants can mess it up big time. Here’s what WebMD say: “Chicken fajitas can be a healthy option. But they’re often served with heaps of sour cream, shredded cheese, refried beans, and fried rice. Pack it all in, and you’ve got plenty of calories to pad your waistline! Instead, load up on grilled peppers, onions, chicken, and fresh salsa. Stick with just one tortilla.
“The Count: 1,300 calories, 47 grams fat, 4,800 milligrams sodium”

Deep dish pizza with sausage is obviously going to be a caloric heavyweight. To lighten the load consider thin crust without the sausage.

Vegetarian Fried Rice is another caloric curve ball. WebMD notes that the veggie options aren’t always the healthiest. They put the count for Vegetarian Fried Rice at 1,090 calories, 19 grams fat, 2,210 milligrams sodium.

At this point it is probably a good idea to remember that the American Heart Association recommends we limit our sodium consumption to 1500 mg per day.

A really worthwhile tip is the one under the heading Eat Better: Find Hidden Calories: “You can skip the most fattening restaurant meals by reading the menu closely. Look for clues. Words like pan-fried, sautéed, battered, breaded, au gratin, cheesy, creamy, buttered, deep-fried, béarnaise, or crispy are usually signs of extra fat and calories. “Crisp” items are often deep-fried in oil.”

Here’s is one that I must fight the temptation over every time I eat out – the basket of bread. When I was gaining my weight some years ago, I would start a meal with a couple of slices of thick Italian bread dipped in olive oil and sprinkled with parmesan cheese – delicious, yes, but diabolical for calories. I probably consumed 500 calories this way BEFORE the entree arrived. Beware the bread.

Regarding dessert, stick with fruits and forget the baked goodies.

Buon appetito!

Tony

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Secrets for Living a Longer Life – WebMD

Regular readers know that I am a big fan of WebMD. I often quote from them to share ideas with readers. They have just run an item on living longer that has some wonderful suggestions. By no small coincidence, I have also included many of the same suggestioins in this blog over the past five plus years. However, here are a few that were new to me:

Profiles of two partners looking at each other while arm wrestling

Profiles of two partners looking at each other while arm wrestling

“Be Conscientious – An 80-year study found one of the best predictors of a long life is a conscientious personality. Researchers measured attributes like attention to detail and persistence. They found that conscientious people do more things to protect their health and make choices that lead to stronger relationships and better careers. “

As a person who considers himself to be conscientious I was happy to learn that it may be instrumental in my living longer.

Choose Friends Wisely – This seems logical if not obvious. Our friends’ habits rub off on us. “Studies indicate obesity is socially “contagious” —  your chance of becoming obese increases by 57 percent if you have a friend who becomes obese. Smoking is another habit that spreads through social ties, but the good news is that quitting is also contagious,” WebMD said.

Nap more. As a retired guy, I like (and practice) this one a lot. “A recent study with 24,000 participants suggests that regular nappers are 37 percent less likely to die from heart disease than occasional nappers. Researchers think naps might help the heart by keeping stress hormones down.”

I fully understand stress hormones and their effect on the body. Check out my s t r e s s tag at the right to read further on it. I recommend the post – Super Tools for Handling Stress.

Forgive – “Letting go of grudges has surprising physical health benefits. Chronic anger is linked to decreased lung function, heart disease, stroke, and other ailments. Forgiveness will reduce anxiety, lower blood pressure, and help you to breathe more easily. These benefits tend to increase as you get older.” This was certainly a nice one to learn. Forgiving makes even more sense now.

The last three I will mention are near and dear to my heart. Namely, make sleep a priority, keep moving and lose weight.

Sleep –  “Getting enough good quality sleep can lower the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and mood disorders. Sufficient sleep will also help you recover from illness faster. Burning the midnight oil, on the other hand, carries serious health risks. Sleeping less than 5 hours per night boosts the risk of premature death, so make sleep a priority.” I agree with this so wholeheartedly that I have written a Page on it – How Important is a Good Night’s Sleep.

Keep Moving – “The evidence is overwhelming — people who exercise live longer on average than those who don’t. According to dozens of studies, regular physical activity reduces the risk of heart disease, stroke, diabetes, some forms of cancer, and depression. Exercise may even help you stay mentally sharp in into old age. Ten-minute spurts of activity are fine, as long as they add up to about 2.5 hours of moderate exercise per week.”

Since the mantra of this blog is eat less;move more; live longer, I rest my case. I did especially like that WebMD mentioned that you “stay mentally sharp” from exercise. Check out my Page Important Facts About Your Brain (and Exercise Benefits) for a lot more information on the benefits the brain derives from exercise.

Last, but now least, Lose Weight – “If you’re overweight, slimming down can protect against diabetes, heart disease, and other life-shortening conditions. Belly fat appears to be particularly harmful, so focus on deflating that spare tire. A 5-year study of Hispanics and African-Americans suggests eating more fiber and exercising regularly are effective ways to reduce belly fat.”

To read the entire 18 reasons cited by WebMD.

Tony

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Filed under aging, living longer, WebMD

Super WebMD Item on Food Frauds

Regular readers know that I have written lots of posts based on WebMD items. I think their latest one – Food Frauds That Can Wreck Your Diet is one of their best.

Here are some of the highlights:

Caesar Salads: “You might think that because it’s a salad, it’s fine. But just a small bowl has 300-400 calories and 30 grams of fat, thanks to loads of dressing.”

Banana chips are not a healthy fresh fruit snack

Banana chips are not a healthy fresh fruit snack

This is an element in most salads. You really need to watch out for how much salad dressing you add.

Fresh Smoothies: “That berry blend at a smoothie shop can have a whopping 80 grams of sugar, 350 calories or more, little protein, and often no fresh fruit. Fruit concentrates are often used instead of fresh fruit.”

Energy Bars: They recommend, “Choose bars that have 200 calories or less, some fiber, and at least 5 grams of protein, which helps provide energy when the sugar rush fades.”

Latte with 2% Milk: “Reward yourself with whipped cream on top. But this trade-off still adds up to 580 calories and 15 grams of saturated fat in a 20-ounce white chocolate mocha. That’s more than a quarter-pound burger with cheese.”

In my opinion, designer coffee drinks are really diabolical when it comes to watching your weight. I found out years ago that more often than not they set you back instead of helping you out.

Microwave Popcorn: “The word “snack” can be a little misleading on microwave popcorn. One popular brand packs 9 grams of fat into each “snack size” bag.”

This is another calorie trap. Popcorn is usually a healthy snack, depending on how you fix it. The microwave way, while very fast, is one of the worst in terms of health. Lots of bad fat and calories.

Banana Chips: “Deep-fried bananas don’t look greasy, but just one ounce has 145 calories, 9 grams of fat, and 8 grams of saturated fat: about the same as a fast-food hamburger.”

How can anything made from fresh fruit be a calorie bomb? Easy, deep fry it. WebMD suggests snacking on a fresh banana for four times the food, no fat and only 100 calories.

There are a total of 21 of these examples of what they term food frauds. I have picked out the ones most meaningful to me. Do yourself a favor and go back and click on the link for the full series. They also give suggestions on how to tweak them to make them less unhealthy.

As always, it pays you to be alert to serving size and portion control. I grew up snacking and most of the weight problems that I experienced resulted from that.

Check out my Page – Snacking – The Good, The Bad and The Ugly for more on this.

Tony

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R.I.P., Robin Williams

I have been a fan of Robin Williams since he exploded on the public consciousness with his antics as Mork, the alien from Ork in 1978. For more than three decades he never failed to bring me to outright laughter in his manic public appearances. His humor was so powerful that I often had tears running down my face and couldn’t catch my breath from laughing so violently. It is so tragically ironic that the battle with depression, of all things, cost him his life. I feel like I have lost a wonderful, funny, crazy friend.

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I posted on depression just over a year ago – How Bad is Depression?. You can read the entire item by clicking the link.

Here are some highlights:

One of the first things you need to know about depression is that it is a disorder of cognition not just mood, according to Robert D. Edger, M.D. speaking before Northwestern Memorial Hospital’s Healthy Transitions Program®.

Depression is significantly more than feeling down or feeling sad.

Dr. Edger said that depression is the leading cause of disability in the world according to the World Health Organization. Women outnumber men by a factor of two-to-one. Only a quarter of the people who suffer from depression ever get treated. (Emphasis mine.)

The Mayo Clinic said, “More than just a bout of the blues, depression isn’t a weakness, nor is it something that you can simply ‘snap out’ of. Depression is a chronic illness that usually requires long-term treatment.

WebMD wrote today, “One of the most urgent signs, which calls for immediate action, is talking about death or suicide.

“Other warning signs, according to Schneider, Krakower, and the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, may include:

“Talking about hopelessness, helplessness, and worthlessness
Feelings of being trapped, desperate, or anxious
Having persistent sadness or depression
Becoming more angry or irritable
Losing interest in life or loved ones
Having sleep problems
Contacting people and seeming to say goodbye”

Williams was only 63 years old, a young man by modern standards. Certainly, he could have counted on another decade or two if he hadn’t gotten derailed by the depression.

If any good can come from this tragic loss, perhaps it will be to awaken us to the dangers of depression and raise our level of consciousness on the subject. Maybe someone, or someone’s family, will address the problem instead of taking the easy way out and ignoring it. As funnyman Robin Williams has demonstrated, depression is no laughing matter.

Tony

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Filed under depression, Mayo Clinic, mental health

How to Practice Weight Control at Cookouts

It isn’t easy. After all, the half the fun of a cookout is seeing the meat being grilled outside.

But WebMD has some words of wisdom regarding that grill full of goodies. “A 20 ounce T-bone steak can weigh in at 1,540 calories and 124 g fat.  An average cheeseburger has 750 calories and 45 grams of fat. What about pork or beef ribs? They come from the fattiest part of the animal.”

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Remember, the average adult needs about 2200 calories to maintain body weight. Being careless at a cookout can put you way over budget as far as calories are concerned. Or, should I say, weigh over budget?

WebMD suggests going lean with cuts like pork tenderloin, skinless chicken breast and lean ground beef. If you can get these onto the grill without insulting your host, you are home free. If not, you need to be careful and cut way back when it comes to plate-filling. Those calorie bombs go down easy, but take hours of sweat to burn off. We all know the cliche Seconds on the lips forever on the hips.

One of the tricks that works well and is more subtle than bringing your own lean meat is to bring a tray of appetizers that includes carrots, celery, etc. You can work on filling up on those munchies so that a smaller portion of the high fat meat will satisfy you.

When the meal winds down to dessert time, beware of the cakes and pies. Once again, you can do an end run here, and bring some healthy pineapple slices or, better yet, watermelon. Everyone loves watermelon and it is minimal in calories. Watermelon happens to be one of my favorite foods. Check out How Healthy is Watermelon? to read further about how healthy it is.

There are few treats more refreshing than watermelon on a summer day.

There are few treats more refreshing than watermelon on a summer day.

The old saying an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure applies here. Paying attention to serving size and exercising portion control can keep you on the safe side. If you don’t overdo the eating and drinking, you won’t have to worry about extra exercise to work it off.

Focus on lean eating and conversation and avoid at all costs mindless munching.

Tony

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Where Do I Find Hidden Sugar in My Diet?

Sugar, like other damaging white powders, salt, cocaine, can often be found in the most unlikely places. Locking down the top of your sugar bowl isn’t enough to save you from consuming too much of this sinful sweet.

WebMD has a super quiz that tests our “Sugar Smarts” which I recommend that you take as soon as possible.

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“Soda, fruit drinks and juices, sports drinks, energy drinks, and other sugar-sweetened beverages are the No. 1 source of added sugar in American diets. (Emphasis mine) A recent study found that drinking one or two sugary drinks a day raises the risk of Type 2 diabetes by 26 percent compared with those who limit sweet drinks to just one a month.

“But sugar alone isn’t to blame for diabetes. Diets that are high in calories from any source, like sugar or fat, lead to weight gain — and being overweight raises your chance of Type 2 diabetes,” the quiz says in answer to its fifth question – where do added sugars hide? That’s all the spoilers I’m going to give you.

The American Heart Association recommends a total of six teaspoons of sugar a day for women and nine for men. In fact, Americans consume an average of 22 teaspoons a day. Those teaspoonsful have little nutritional value but load you up with empty calories. For more on empty calories, check out my Page – A Love Letter to Hostess Ho Ho’s – NOT.

Is it any wonder that 60 percent of us are overweight and 30 percent obese?

Please take the WebMD quiz and learn more about this very damaging ‘nutrient’ in our daily diet.

Tony

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Filed under diabetes, food labels, fruit drinks, health, overweight, weight loss

What are the Best and Worst Super Bowl Snacks?

Okay, the Big Day has finally arrived. It’s Super Bowl Sunday. Yay! The Broncos and Seahawks square off late this afternoon for what many consider the grandest prize in all sports, the Lombardi Trophy. Unlike most other football games, we will all be staying on our couches and watching the numerous commercials that interrupt the action. And, while watching this afternoon we will be snacking, whether we are home, at a friend’s place for a party or out at a bar with a giant flatscreen. Therein lies the rub. I love watching the game and have struggled through the ups and downs of the past season to get here, but, like you, I love to snack while watching the game.

Boiled Edamame with a dusting of coarse salt.

Boiled Edamame with a dusting of coarse salt. Yum.

One of the best snacks that I will be munching on today, and I was surprised to learn that WebMD agrees with me, is Edamame, or soybeans in the pod. Costco sells them by the bag and it takes only five minutes to boil them up. Sushi places serve them with a dusting of giant salt crystals. You can match those by picking up some Coarse Kosher Salt at your supermarket. A four ounce serving of Edamame amounts to around 120 calories. There is also four grams of fat, no saturate fat or cholesterol, eight grams of sodium, 12 grams of carbohydrates, four grams of healthy vegetable fiber and 12 grams of body-building protein. The fact that the beans are still in the pod helps to make them a great finger food as you have to crack them out before you can eat the beans inside. For my money, this extra step adds to their appeal and it slows down my consumption to some extent.

On the negative side, one of the worst snacks according to WebMD, are Mozzarella Sticks. WebMD says, “There’s something about a stick of warm, gooey cheese that is irresistible — until you take a look at the nutritional facts. A typical order has 930 calories, 48 g of fat, and 2,640 mg of sodium. That puts mozzarella sticks pretty much on par with chicken wings.

For a slideshow of WebMD’s Best and Worst Appetizers click the link. The slideshow also gives the skinny on Onion Blossoms vs. Vegetable Kabobs, Spinach Artichoke Dip vs. Spinach Salad, Cheese Fries vs. Crab Cakes. Check out their entire spectrum at the link above to read them all.

Instead of beer or diet soda, do yourself a favor by drinking something healthy like coconut water or just plain ice water for something clean and healthy without any dangerous chemicals. Check out my Page – What’s wrong with Soft Drinks? also Snacking – the good, the bad, and the ugly for more on this topic.

Enjoy the game with a clean conscience.

Buon Appetito!

Tony

Are you pulling for the Broncos or Seahawks? I confess I am torn. As a long time NFL fan, I want to see Peyton Manning get his second ring. On the other hand on a personal basis, my former brother in law, Dan Quinn, who I have known since he was a teenager, is the mastermind of  the Seahawk’s defense, their defensive coordinator. I would love to see Dan get his first Super Bowl ring. 

Que sera, sera.

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Filed under calories, diet soda, sodium, Super Bowl, vegetables, Weight

Trick or Treat – How Much Chocolate Do We Eat?

Since this is the biggest day for chocolate consumption in the year, I thought it would be worthwhile to check into it.

Do you know how much chocolate the average American eats in a year? One pound? Ten pounds?

As a matter of fact we eat an average of a pound of chocolate a month, so 12 pounds in a year.

chocolate

According to WebMD’s chocolate quiz “We each eat close to a dozen pounds of chocolate per year. And most of that is milk chocolate. More than 90% of Americans say they prefer milk chocolate over dark or white.

“It takes a long time to work off all that chocolate. It would take a 130-pound woman about four days and nights (95 hours) of brisk walking to burn off those calories!”

And I know you have heard that chocolate has caffeine in it, but how much? WebMD says,

“You’d need to eat 14 regular-sized (1.5 oz) bars of  milk chocolate to get the same caffeine as you’d find in a 8-ounce cup of coffee! That would have about  3,000 calories and more than 300 grams of sugar — compared to only about two calories in black coffee.

“Dark chocolate does have more caffeine than milk chocolate. Even then, it would take four bars to give you the same buzz as one cup of regular Joe.”

So, enjoy the evening, but if you are going out with your little trick or treater, keep in mind how much walking is required to burn off those calories.

Tony

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Filed under caffeine, calories, chocolate, dark chocolate, Halloween, health, healthy eating, healthy living, snack foods, Snacking, trick or treat, walking, Weight

Test Your Fast Food Smarts – Web MD Quiz

I really enjoy the information available from WebMD. They offer articles, studies and quizzes on healthy subjects.

I want to tell you about this recent one – Test Your Fast Food Smarts.
fastfood1
I have been writing this blog for the best part of four years. As a result of this project, I have taken off 15 pounds from what I had thought was my ideal weight 165 pounds. In addition I have a resting heart rate below 50 beats per minute and my body fat remains under 17 per cent. Before I took the quiz I thought I had a really good fix on fast food even though I don’t eat very much of it. However, of the 16 questions in the quiz I got less than half of them right.

Here are a couple of examples of questions in the quiz. I hope they will whet your appetite for more info on the subject.

How many Americans eat fast food every day?

How many of us guzzle sugary drinks daily?

To burn off an order of medium fries, a 155 pound adult needs to? Ride a stationary bike hard for 30 minutes or do high impact aerobics for 30 minutes or strength train for 60 minutes?

On average a teen will grab a fast food meal that has how many calories? 500 to 800; 800 to 1100; 1100 to 1500 calories?

No, I am not going to spoil your fun by giving you any of the answers. I hope you will take the test and derive the full benefit from it. At the risk of using a cliche – You’ll thank me for it.

Tony

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Filed under aerobics, fast food, Mc Donald's, Weight, weight-bearing exercise, weight-training