Tag Archives: Vitamin E

Study shows Vitamin E and Selenium don’t cut colon cancer risk

As one of the former big proponents of Vitamin E, I was disappointed to learn that it does not have all of the healthy impacts I had heard. I just ran across this information that came out a few days ago.

Eight years ago, results from a landmark cancer prevention trial run by SWOG, a National Cancer Institute supported organization, showed that a daily dose of vitamin E and selenium did not prevent prostate cancer. In fact, the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial (SELECT) showed that vitamin E supplementation increased the risk of prostate cancer in healthy men.

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Nuts and avocados are natural sources of Vitamin E

Now, a SWOG review of ancillary SELECT results definitively shows that these two antioxidants also don’t prevent colorectal adenomas – polyps that are the premalignant precursors to most colorectal cancers. Results are published in Cancer Prevention Research.

“The message to the public is this: Vitamin E and selenium will not prevent colorectal adenomas, which are surrogates for colorectal cancer,” said Dr. Peter Lance, lead author of the journal article and deputy director of the University of Arizona Cancer Center. “We have no evidence that these supplements work to prevent cancer.”

Despite the billions spent in the United States each year on vitamin supplements, there is scant evidence they prevent cancer. According to the National Cancer Institute, which funds SWOG through its National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), results from nine randomized trials did not provide evidence that antioxidant supplements are beneficial in primary cancer prevention. An in-depth review conducted for the United States Preventive Services Task Force likewise found no clear evidence of benefit. Continue reading

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Why eating olives is a good idea

I like to eat olives and I know a lot of folks who share my preference. So, besides a fascinating taste, what are they good for?

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Here is what the olive industry says:

– Olives eliminate excess cholesterol in the blood.

 – Olives control blood pressure.

 – Olives are a source of dietary fiber as an alternative to fruits and vegetables.

 – Olives are a great source of Vitamin E

 – Olives act as an antioxidant, protecting cells

 – Olives reduce the effects of degenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, benign and malignant tumours, including less serious varicose veins and cavities

 – Olives help prevent blood clots that could lead to a myocardial infarction or deep vein thrombosis (DVT)

 – Olives protect cell membranes against diseases like cancer

 – Olives are a great protection against anemia

 – Olives enhances fertility and reproductive system

 – Olives play an important role in maintaining a healthy immune system, especially during oxidative stress and chronic viral diseases

 – And just in case these benefits weren’t enough, they are also a great aphrodisiac.

 – Olives are nutritious and rich in mineral content as sodium, potassium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus and iodine

 – Olives provide essential vitamins and amino acids.

 – Olives contain oleic acid, which has beneficial properties to protect the heart.

 – Olives contain polyphenols, a natural chemical that reduce oxidative stress in the brain. So by eating a daily serving of olives helps improve your memory by up to 25%.

 – Just one cup of olives is a great source of iron – 4.4mg.

 – Eating olives can improve the appearance of wrinkles by 20% since they contain oleic acid, which keeps skin soft and healthy.

 – By eating just 10 olives before a meal, you can reduce your appetite by up to 20%. This is because the monounsaturated fatty acids contained in olives slow down the digestion process and stimulate the hormone cholecystokinin, a hormone that sends messages of fullness to the brain.

 – Not only does it do that, but it also helps your body to stimulate the production of adiponectin, a chemical that burns fat for up to five hours after ingestion.

Tony

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Filed under blood pressure, cholesterol, olives