Tag Archives: sore muscles

Sore muscles after exercise – MNT

Lots of folks are experiencing new beginnings right now as the new year commences. Exercise programs are high on the list of resolutions, particularly after some festive over indulgence in the past month. Medical News Today offered the following explanation of that pain you have in your freshly exercised muscles.

Whether you are cramming in some last-minute exercise before the holidays or trying a new workout, beware of aching muscles. But why does your body feel so sore, and what can you do to speed up recovery?

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Have you decided to make a start on your New Year’s resolution and take up exercise now? Or maybe you’re looking at stepping up your usual routine as a result of the inevitable excesses of the holidays? The chances are that your muscles will pay the price.

Starting within a day of your exercise session, your muscles begin to seize up, and you feel more and more uncomfortable. For the next couple of days, you move like a robot, find it hard to dress yourself, and the simple act of walking down a set of stairs will see you groaning in agony.

Whether you have recently taken up exercise or simply pushed your limits, you may well be familiar with this sequence of events. Continue reading

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Filed under cardio exercise, core exercises, Exercise, exercise benefits, exercise duration, New Year Resolutions, sore muscles

What About Emu Oil?

One Regular Guy Writing about Food, Exercise and Living Past 100

I stumbled across this strange substance while in the dog park. Despite the expression, “What happens in the dog park stays in the dog park,” I am going to share my experience  with you.

There was a Doberman that had the most beautiful coat I had ever seen on a dog. This dog’s coat epitomized the word lustrous. The Dobe just stood out from the other canines. I asked the owner what she used to produce such a gorgeous coat. She said that she rubbed it with emu oil.

Not recognizing the word, I asked her to spell it. E-M-U. Okay, when I got home I went to work on the computer and learned from the Maple Springs Website: “Emu oil comes from the rendered and refined fat of the emu bird. The emu is similar to an ostrich, a member of the ratite family. Most of…

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Filed under emu oil

What About Emu Oil?

I stumbled across this strange substance while in the dog park. Despite the expression, “What happens in the dog park stays in the dog park,” I am going to share my experience  with you.

There was a Doberman that had the most beautiful coat I had ever seen on a dog. This dog’s coat epitomized the word lustrous. The Dobe just stood out from the other canines. I asked the owner what she used to produce such a gorgeous coat. She said that she rubbed it with emu oil.

Not recognizing the word, I asked her to spell it. E-M-U. Okay, when I got home I went to work on the computer and learned from the Maple Springs Website: “Emu oil comes from the rendered and refined fat of the emu bird. The emu is similar to an ostrich, a member of the ratite family. Most of the birds are raised in the U.S. by emu farmers, and then sent to be rendered and refined. This type of farming is similar to cattle farming. One of the things we know about the emu is that they have wonderful immune systems. The emu can be close to death from injury and in a few days be good as new. It is this wonderful healing properties that they pass along through the emu oil. This is why the emu oil is good for so many things.”

The University of Texas medical school said that their tests indicated that emu oil was very good for the skin and is a “non pore clogging substance, helping the keep the skin healthy.”

The Properties of emu oil included it being a good source of Omega 3, Omega 6 and Omega 9. When applied directly to the skin it will penetrate and deliver the health benefits of these essential fatty acids.

According to WebMD, “Some people apply emu oil to the skin for relief from sore muscles, aching joints, pain or inflammation, carpal tunnel syndrome, sciatica, shin splints, and gout. It is also used topically to improve healing of wounds, cuts, and burns from radiation therapy; to reduce bruises and stretch marks; to reduce scarring and keloids; to heal surgical wounds caused by removing skin for skin grafts; to reduce redness due to acne; and to soften dry cuticles and promote healthy nails. Emu oil is also used topically athlete’s foot; diaper rash; canker sores; chapped lips; poor circulation; and skin conditions, including cancer, dry skin, dandruff, eczema, psoriasis, wrinkles or age spots. It is also used to protect skin from sun damage and to promote more youthful looking skin.
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