Tag Archives: Rush University Medical Center

How the Body Regulates Heat – Rush

The first week in July seems an appropriate time to consider the subject of the body and how it regulates and reacts to heat. Rush University Medical Center offered the following extensive discussion of heat and the body.

A close look at the complex systems that keep us functioning can inspire awe. Such is the case with the body’s complicated temperature-regulating mechanism.

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This intricate apparatus balances heat production with heat loss, keeping the body at a temperature just right for optimal function. This balancing act is directed automatically and seamlessly by the hypothalamus, a small portion of the brain that serves as the command center for numerous bodily functions, including the coordination of the autonomic nervous system.

Much like a thermostat regulates the temperature inside your home, the hypothalamus regulates your body temperature, responding to internal and external stimuli and making adjustments to keep the body within one or two degrees of 98.6 degrees. Continue reading

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Filed under body heat, body regulating heat, fever, heatstroke, hot flashes

My experience with CBD Oil for arthritis pain

I wrote about my experience with CBD Oil for the arthritis pain I suffer from in my hands. You can read that post below.

What I have today is a fresh rundown from Rush University Medical Center.

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One Regular Guy Writing about Food, Exercise and Living Past 100

Last month I wrote a post on CBD Oil as a possible pain reliever for the arthritis I suffer from in my hands. Before you read the current post, I wish you would go back and check out the original from January 18. It is from Medical News Today and has lots of good information in it. This is a quote from that post “CBD is a type of cannabinoid, which is a chemical found in cannabis plants. Unlike delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), another chemical found in cannabis, CBD is not psychoactive. This means it does not change a person’s mental state or produce a “high” as THC can.

So, now you know what it is, and isn’t. You can’t get high using this stuff.

On to my experiment experience with it. Of course I went to Amazon because that is where you buy anything. And, of course…

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Filed under arthritis, cannabanoid, CBD oil, hand arthritis, osteoarthritis, Rush Medical Center

From a Winter Vortex to a Pollen Vortex? – Rush Medical Center

In January of 1940 I was born at the Presbyterian Hospital on Chicago’s west side. That hospital became Pres-St. Luke’s later and in its current incarnation it is called Rush University Medical Center. I wanted to mention those facts because I currently read their very useful blog posts. As a Midwesterner who has just suffered through the polar vortex, I was not pleased to learn that we may be in store for a pollen vortex. Doctor Payal Patel, an allergy and immunology specialist, wrote the following.

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After surviving the polar vortex of 2019, many of us are just itching for some warm weather. But for allergy sufferers, could that itch be worse this year compared to the years past? Is this year truly the worst allergy season?

To answer that question, we must first take into account the climate pattern changes that are predicted to take place in our future. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change are predicting a double to triple rise in the atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels within the next century. This rise in CO2 levels, in turn leads to changes in temperature and precipitation. Namely, Earth’s average temperature is expected to rise, as will the average global precipitation.

These global changes are the perfect setup for increasing pollen in the environment. This occurs by not only increasing the pollen production by some plants, but also by extending the pollen season. Continue reading

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Filed under allergies, immunotherapy, mold, pollen, Rush Medical Center

Can Exercise Slow Cognitive Decline?

Experts in aging and Alzheimer’s disease are conducting a national clinical study to determine if exercise may be an effective non-drug intervention for maintaining cognitive fitness.

The Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center at Rush University Medical Center is the only site in Illinois, and one of only 15 sites across the United States leading the Exercise in Adults With Mild Memory Problems (EXERT) study, which is trying to determine if exercise can slow the progress of memory loss and cognitive impairment in older adults.

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Neuroscientists are collaborating with the YMCA to provide individualized, one-on-one exercise programs and personal training to study participants. Rush will be working with the McGaw YMCA in Evanston, Illinois, to provide 45-minute personal training sessions for one year.

Adults with memory issues may avoid being active when they need it most

“We want to see if a personalized program implemented in the community and prescribed by health care providers can be an effective therapy for people with memory issues,” said Dr. Neelum Aggarwal, associate professor of neurology and principal investigator of the EXERT study at Rush. Continue reading

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Filed under aging brain, Alzheimer's disease, brain, brain function, brain health, cognitive decline, exercise and brain health

How to battle holiday weight gain – Rush

In deference to the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday which ushers in the holiday season, I published yesterday my post – Healthy eating tops for the holidays.

I thought this write up from Rush University Medical Center was a worthwhile follow up. The Rush dietitian has some good detailed suggestions and examples.

Trying to lose weight during the holiday season may be unrealistic, given that the average American gains one to five pounds between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day, a six-week span marked by celebrations, eating and drinking.

This is especially true for people who are already overweight.

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A review of studies evaluating holiday weight gain determined the average gain between Thanksgiving and New Year’s to be only 0.8 pounds. However, people who were already overweight or obese gained as much as five pounds. A more recent evaluation also found that obese people experienced greater increases in body fat over the holiday season compared to people in the normal weight range. Continue reading

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Filed under holiday eating, holiday weight gain, Weight, weight control, weight loss, weight mainetenance

Stave Off Cognitive Decline With Seafood – Rush

I have written repeatedly about the benefits to the brain of cardiovascular exercise. You can fill yourself in on details from my Page – Important facts about your brain (and exercise benefits).

Eating a meal of seafood or other foods containing omega-3 fatty acids at least once a week may protect against age-related memory loss and thinking problems in older people, according to a team of researchers at Rush University Medical Center and Wageningen University in the Netherlands.

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Their research findings were published in the online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study was supported by the National Institute on Aging and the Judith Zwartz Foundation.

The age-related memory loss and thinking problems of participants in the study who reported eating seafood less than once a week declined more rapidly compared to those who ate at least one seafood meal per week. Continue reading

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Filed under aging, aging brain, cardio exercise, cognitive decline, Exercise

Alzheimer’s is a common contributor to death

Regular readers know that I have a vested interest in Alzheimer’s Disease information having lost an aunt to it as well as two other family members to dementia. According to research by Rush University Medical Center the disease is responsible for far more deaths that are reported.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Alzheimer’s as the cause of about 70,000 deaths in 2010, making it the sixth greatest cause of death (heart disease and cancer hold a firm grip on the top two spots). However, when related conditions are considered, the number actually is about 500,000, according to a research study authored by Bryan James, PhD, an epidemiologist with the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center and assistant professor in Rush’s Department of Internal Medicine.

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Many people with the illness succumb to related conditions rather than Alzheimer’s itself. The most common are pneumonia and falls, according to Raj Shah, MD, a researcher with the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center and an associate professor in the Rush Department of Family Medicine.

“They may be listed as the causes on a death certificate, but the person wouldn’t have had that fall or pneumonia without Alzheimer’s,” Shah says. Continue reading

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Filed under aging, aging brain, Alzheimer's disease, Alzheimer's risk

Stave Off Cognitive Decline With Seafood – Rush

Regular readers know that I have lost three family members to Alzheimer’s Disease or dementia in general.  So, my ears prick up when I hear of anything that might mitigate against these afflictions.  Rush University Medical Center has reported just that.

Eating a meal of seafood or other foods containing omega-3 fatty acids at least once a week may protect against age-related memory loss and thinking problems in older people, according to a team of researchers at Rush University Medical Center and Wageningen University in the Netherlands.

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Their research findings were published in the May 4 online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study was supported by the National Institute on Aging and the Judith Zwartz Foundation.

The age-related memory loss and thinking problems of participants in the study who reported eating seafood less than once a week declined more rapidly compared to those who ate at least one seafood meal per week.

“This study helps show that while cognitive abilities naturally decline as part of the normal aging process, there is something that we can do to mitigate this process,” says Martha Clare Morris, ScD, a Rush nutritional epidemiologist and senior author of the paper.

Four types of seafood, five types of brain function

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