Tag Archives: potassium

More Good Reasons to eat Bananas – Infographic

I love bananas. If the average American eats 28 pounds a year, I eat 70 pounds. I have posted about them several times. (Check below for links.)

I put one in my breakfast smoothie every day. Check out the neat facts in this infographic.

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To read further on this neat fruit:

6 Super Facts About Bananas – Infographics
55 Healthy Snacks Under 200 Calories – Infographic
6 Reasons You Should Eat Bananas – Infographic

Tony

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6 Super Facts About Bananas – Infographics

I think they taste great and are utterly simple to eat, but isn’t it nice to know that there are wonderfully healthy aspects to eating bananas, too?

110de430e33b5cf16ff39dbf1d8bdc79

Tony

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Potassium-rich Foods Cut Stroke, Death Risks Among Older Women

“Our findings give women another reason to eat their fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables are good sources of potassium, and potassium not only lowers postmenopausal women’s risk of stroke, but also death.”

Cooking with Kathy Man

Postmenopausal women who eat foods higher in potassium are less likely to have strokes and die than women who eat less potassium-rich foods, according to new research in the American Heart Association’s journal Stroke.

“Previous studies have shown that potassium consumption may lower blood pressure. But whether potassium intake could prevent stroke or death wasn’t clear,” said Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Ph.D., study senior author and distinguished university professor emerita, department of epidemiology and population health at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.

“Our findings give women another reason to eat their fruits and vegetables. Fruits and vegetables are good sources of potassium, and potassium not only lowers postmenopausal women’s risk of stroke, but also death.”

Researchers studied 90,137 postmenopausal women, ages 50 to 79, for an average 11 years. They looked at how much potassium the women consumed, as well as if they had strokes, including ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes…

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Are There Health Risks in Hot Yoga?

I got into yoga some years ago when I dated a woman who taught it. We went out for about two years and did yoga at least once a day. After we split up I still did yoga daily for several years.This was all before the current yoga craze. My experience of yoga was totally positive. I achieved excellent physical balance and learned through breath control to deal with stress. I can’t give you a good reason for stopping outside of mental and physical inertia.

I did not do hot yoga, nor even hear of it in that time. If you aren’t aware of it, hot yoga is done in a temperature of 105  Fahrenheit with humidity around 40 percent.

Those are hot conditions to do anything.

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Consumer Reports recently reported on woman who complained that it left her light-headed, fatigued and weak. “I was completely exhausted, just depleted,” Julianne Pepe said of her reactions after practicing hot yoga.

These sound suspiciously like the symptoms of heat exhaustion or heat stoke.

As a cyclist in all four seasons, I am very aware of these symptoms. Please check out my page – What to Do About Extreme Heat for more on the dangers of extreme heat.

I haven’t heard a lot of reports like this from folks doing hot yoga. I know there are good aspects of the heat, too. Studio owner, Rich Pike, told Consumer Reports, “Heat allows you to bend safely and be more flexible. What the sweating does is it eliminates toxins through your sweat.”

It is true that sweating releases toxins from the body. But, keep in mind sweat contains other chemicals including salt and potassium which are vital electrolytes. Doing an extended hot yoga session and getting dehydrated can be dangerous to your health.

As in all situations, you need to listen to what your body is telling you. If you are benefitting from the practice, you won’t be getting mixed signals like confusion, light-headedness, etc.

Tony

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Is It Worth Cutting Salt and Boosting Potassium?

Worth thinking about. Also, don’t forget all the hidden sources of salt in the processed foods in your diet. Pay attention to the ingredients and nutritional breakdown.

Cooking with Kathy Man

Cutting down on salt and increasing potassium can safely lower blood pressure by a small amount, research shows. However, it’s less clear whether this reduces the chance of having strokes and other heart and circulation problems.

What do we know already?

If you have high blood pressure, you have a raised risk of several serious health problems, including heart attacks, strokes, and heart failure.

Lots of things can affect your blood pressure, including what you eat and drink. Too much salt and too little potassium can both increase your blood pressure. Doctors recommend that people with high blood pressure eat less salt, and they sometimes recommend taking potassium supplements or eating more potassium-rich foods such as bananas, oranges, tomatoes, and pulses.

However, we don’t know for sure how much cutting salt and increasing potassium actually lowers blood pressure, and whether the reduction in blood pressure really reduces the risk of…

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