Tag Archives: physical activity

The Mayo Clinic tells why you should exercise regularly

Regular readers know that I feel very strongly about exercising regularly. Eat less; move more; live longer is the mantra of this blog. So, I was thrilled to receive a Mayo Clinic Newsletter from Dr. Robert Sheeler, Medical Editor of the Mayo Clinic Health Letter. So many people think about exercise as an adjunct to dieting to lose weight. Wrong. You need to exercise to stay generally healthy and also to maintain a healthy body weight. You don’t stop after you reach your goal weight.

Here’s what the good doctor had to say, “If you exercise regularly, you may lower your risk of a heart attack and stroke. If you are middle-aged or older and haven’t been exercising regularly or have a chronic health problem, work with your doctor to develop an exercise program.

Running at the fitness club

“To condition your heart safely:
Start at a comfortable level of exertion — Try walking five to 10 minutes over a short distance indoors. Increase your time by five minutes a session as you’re able.
Schedule regular exercise — Aim for 30 to 60 minutes a day of low- to moderate-intensity physical activity.
Include variety — Combine three types of exercise — stretching (flexibility), endurance (aerobic or cardio) and strengthening (weight training). Start each session with a warm-up of lower intensity, and cool down gradually. Mind-body exercises, such as yoga and tai chi, may provide even greater benefits.
Cross-train to reduce your risk of injury — Alternate among exercises that emphasize different parts of the body, such as swimming, bicycling and walking.
Don’t overdue it — Start slowly and build up gradually, allowing time between sessions for your body to rest and recover. And forget the saying “No pain, no gain.” A little muscle soreness when you do something new isn’t unusual, but soreness doesn’t equal pain. If it hurts, stop doing it.
Increase your physical activity — Even routine activities such as gardening, climbing stairs or washing floors can burn calories and help improve your health. You’ll get the most benefit from a structured exercise program, but any physical movement helps. Walk or bike to the store instead of driving, park farther away at the shopping mall or take the stairs instead of taking an elevator.”

Want more great health information? Visit the store now to see the latest products from Mayo Clinic doctors, specialists and editorial staff.

Tony

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Latest update on U.S. nutrition, physical activity and obesity

Each month, the office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion releases an infographic with the latest data related to a Healthy People 2020 Leading Health Indicator (LHI) topic. These infographics show progress toward Healthy People 2020 LHI targets — and show where there’s still work to be done.  

This month’s featured LHI topic is Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity. Check out the infographic below, then head over to the Healthy People 2020 LHI Infographic Gallery to see infographics for other LHI topic areas.

LHI_2017_November_Full-Infographic.png

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Filed under childhood obesity, Exercise, exercise benefits, how much exercise, nutrition, nutrition information, nutritional deficiencies, obesity

5 Myths That Keep People From Exercising – NIH

No, a myth is not a female moth. (Sorry, couldn’t resist). Regular readers know that eat less; move more is the mantra of this blog. So, if you are one of the folks who is resisting getting an exercise program going, take heed.

The National Institutes of Health offers the following:
Even when you know physical activity is good for you, it’s easy to keep dragging your feet literally. We all have reasons to stay inactive, but sometimes those reasons are based more on myth than reality. Here are some of the most common myths about physical activity and ways to replace them with a more realistic, can-do spirit.

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Myth 1: “Physical activity takes too much time.”
Physical activity does take some time, but there are ways to make it manageable. If you don’t have 30 minutes in your daily schedule for an activity break, try to find three 10-minute periods. If you’re aiming for 60 minutes daily? A good goal if you’re trying to avoid weight gain? Perhaps you can carve out some “fitness time” early in the day, before your schedule gets too busy. Another idea is to combine physical activity with a task that’s already part of your daily routine, such as walking the dog or doing yard chores.

Myth 2: “Getting in shape makes you tired.”
Once you begin regular physical activity, you’re likely to have even more energy than before. As you progress, daily tasks will seem easier. Regular, moderate-to-brisk physical activity can also help you to reduce fatigue and manage stress.

Myth 3: “The older you are, the less physical activity you need.”
Most people become less physically active as they age, but keeping fit is important throughout life. Regular physical activity increases older people’s ability to perform routine daily tasks and to stay independent longer. No matter what your age, you can find a physical activity program that is tailored to your particular fitness level and needs.

Myth 4: “Taking medication interferes with physical activity.”
In most cases, this is not true. In fact, becoming more active may lessen your need for certain medicines, such as high blood pressure drugs. However, before beginning a physical activity program, be sure to inform your doctor about both prescription and over-the-counter medications you are taking, so that your health can be properly monitored.

I consider walking to be the Cinderella of the exercise world. Very few people appreciate what a superb exercise this is. Walking is a weight-bearing exercise that benefits your bones and your brains. Please check out my Page Why You Should Walk More for details.

Myth 5: “You have to be athletic to exercise.”
Most physical activities don’t require any special athletic skills. In fact, many people who have bad memories of difficult school sports have discovered a whole world of enjoyable, healthful activities that involve no special talent or training. A perfect example is brisk walking – a superb, heart healthy activity. Others include bicycling, gardening, or yard work, as long as they’re done at a brisk pace. Just do more of the activities you already like and already know how to do. It’s that simple.

Some people should get medical advice before starting, or significantly increasing, physical activity. Check with your doctor first if you:
•    Are over 50 years old and not used to moderately energetic activity.
•    Currently have a heart condition, have developed chest pain within the last month, or have had a heart attack. (Also see the section, “After a Heart Attack.”)
•    Have a parent or sibling who developed heart disease at an early age.
•    Have any other chronic health problem or risk factors for a chronic disease.
•    Tend to easily lose your balance or become dizzy.
•    Feel extremely breathless after mild exertion.
•    Are on any type of medication.

Tony

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Filed under aging, Exercise

Even Moderate Regular Exercise Can Add Years to Your Life

“It doesn’t take a lot of exercise to dramatically improve the way you age. Even moderate exercise helps neutralize free radicals, boost your immune system and even grow new brain cells,” according to The Washington Post.

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The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:

Adults 18 to 64 should get:
2.5 hours per week of moderate intensity exercise.
 OR 1.25 hours a week of vigorous aerobic physical activity
 OR Some combination of the above – equivalent episodes of at least 10 minutes spread throughout the week.

Take a good look at those numbers from the Department. Those aren’t big numbers.

The Washington Post referenced a study “Analyzing data for more than 650,000 people, pooled from six existing studies, and tracking them for an average of 10 years (during which time more than 82,000 deaths were recorded), they found that even a little bit of activity seemed to help people live longer. Compared to no physical activity, just 75 minutes of brisk walking per week was associated with an extra 1.8 years of life expectancy after age 40. Bumping that up to 150 minutes a week – the amount currently recommended by the World Health Organization – was associated with 3.4 years of added longevity; walking briskly for 450 minutes a week or more added up to an extra 4.5 years of life. The relationship between weekly physical activity time and longevity began leveling off at about 300 minutes, the study notes.”

So, with a little bit of regular exercise, you can extend your life, reduce your waistline and bolster your brain power, too. What are you waiting for?

Tony

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Filed under aging, brain, Exercise, living longer, walking, Weight, weight control, weight loss

What is one Pitfall to Beware of in Exercise Tracking?

We are just finishing the first week of the new year. So, for folks who resolved that this year they would begin to make some progress on their weight and waist problem, it is early times.

Statistics say that some 60 percent of us are overweight and 30 percent outright obese. The New York Times reports, “Between 1975 and 2005, the average weight of Americans increased by about 20 pounds. Since the 1970s, the national obesity rate jumped from around 20 percent to over 30 percent.”

Another 10 percent has Type 2 diabetes, a preventable and ruinous disease that stems from inactivity and poor nutrition.

exercise
So. you have decided to eat less and move more this year. An admirable start.

An article in today’s Wall Street Journal, We Don’t Exercise as Much as We say states, “Researchers found a wide variation in physical activity reported on questionnaires compared with objectively measured exercise time during a weeklong study reported in the January issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise. Men were more likely than women to overestimate vigorous exercise activities, the study found, while both sexes underestimated their sedentary times.

“The total time spent on physical activity measured by the accelerometer wasn’t significantly different between the sexes, but men reported 56 additional minutes of walking and moderate exercise on questionnaires than was actually recorded by the accelerometer. Women reported 52 additional minutes.”

This is not intended to put a negative cast on your plans to get healthier this year. That is totally positive. However, since some of us have a propensity to overestimate the amount we exercise and underestimate our sedentary periods, it is a very good idea to make sure that we are accurate in our assessments of those activities.

Hopefully, you will pay closer attention to your workout time and intensity so your expectations of results will be in line with your actions. There is nothing more frustrating than creating a plan and following through on it and then seeing no positive results after all your work. I can’t think of anything more likely to derail your exercise plans.

So, go ahead with your plans to eat less and move more. Just make sure that you are accurate in your daily assessments of these activities. That will enable you to accurately assess your progress.

Good luck!

Tony

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010713 Physical activity guidelines and the benefits of walking

Participating in a daily regimen of physical activity not only enhances your heart, lungs, and circulatory systems it also eases the pain of arthritis.

walking

This may sound counterintuitive to the arthritis sufferer but the physical act of moving the joints keeps the synovial fluid, the transparent, viscid fluid secreted by the synovial membrane and found in joint cavities, bursae, and tendon sheaths, of the joints equally spread throughout them.

Explosivelyfit Strength Training, LLC

Physical activity guidelines and the benefits of walking

The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) recommends at least two and a half hours of strength training per week working muscle groups such as the shoulders, chest, upper back, lower back, legs, and abdominal muscles. And two and a half hours of moderate aerobic activity spread throughout the week. Exercise time is decreased if the intensity is higher. In this case, DHHS recommends one hour and fifteen minutes of vigorous aerobic activity, again spread throughout the week.

You will note there are no weekend warrior (meaning someone who tries to get all of their exercise time in on one day) recommendations here. Those who try to cram it all in on one-day or over two days frequently end up injured.

If you are not able to set aside 30 minutes each day, then do your exercises in 10-minute bursts over…

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