Tag Archives: pandemic

Stay in touch with your emotions to reduce pandemic-induced stress

I have written about stress and relaxation numerous times in the past 10 years. The coronavirus has created a variation on that theme.

Everybody, it seems, is stressed out to some degree by the coronavirus pandemic.

Photo by Nathan Cowley on Pexels.com

It may be anguish over the sickness or death of a friend or family member. It may be anxiety over a job that has been altered or eliminated. It may be disquiet over the competing demands of work and family while working from home.

These are natural emotions during stressful times, says Emily Kroska, a clinical psychologist at the University of Iowa. The good news, she adds, comes from a new study she led that shows how people might reduce their distress.

2 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

Pandemic’s effect on mental health swift and harsh on vulnerable families

As cases and hospitalizations from the pandemic begin to decline, collateral damage on the populace appears to be on the rise.

In just a few months, the COVID-19 pandemic swiftly and substantially worsened mental health among U.S. hourly service workers and their children – especially those experiencing multiple hardships, according to new research from the Center for Child and Family Policy at Duke University and Barnard College.

Photo by Anna Shvets on Pexels.com

The study leverages real-time, daily survey data collected from Feb. 20, before the pandemic hit the U.S., to April 27, when it was well underway, to examine how the crisis affected parents’ and children’s mental well-being. The 645 survey respondents were parents of young children working in hourly service-industry positions in retail, food service or hotel industries in a large U.S. city.

3 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

Toward a coronavirus breathalyzer test

Few people who have undergone nasopharyngeal swabs for coronavirus testing would describe it as a pleasant experience. The procedure involves sticking a long swab up the nose to collect a sample from the back of the nose and throat, which is then analyzed for SARS-CoV-2 RNA by the reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Now, researchers reporting in ACS Nano have developed a prototype device that non-invasively detected COVID-19 in the exhaled breath of infected patients.

Photo by CDC on Pexels.com

In addition to being uncomfortable, the current gold standard for COVID-19 testing requires RT-PCR, a time-consuming laboratory procedure. Because of backlogs, obtaining a result can take several days. To reduce transmission and mortality rates, healthcare systems need quick, inexpensive and easy-to-use tests. Hossam Haick, Hu Liu, Yueyin Pan and colleagues wanted to develop a nanomaterial-based sensor that could detect COVID-19 in exhaled breath, similar to a breathalyzer test for alcohol intoxication. Previous studies have shown that viruses and the cells they infect emit volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can be exhaled in the breath.

The researchers made an array of gold nanoparticles linked to molecules that are sensitive to various VOCs. When VOCs interact with the molecules on a nanoparticle, the electrical resistance changes. The researchers trained the sensor to detect COVID-19 by using machine learning to compare the pattern of electrical resistance signals obtained from the breath of 49 confirmed COVID-19 patients with those from 58 healthy controls and 33 non-COVID lung infection patients in Wuhan, China. Each study participant blew into the device for 2-3 seconds from a distance of 1­–2 cm. Once machine learning identified a potential COVID-19 signature, the team tested the accuracy of the device on a subset of participants. In the test set, the device showed 76% accuracy in distinguishing COVID-19 cases from controls and 95% accuracy in discriminating COVID-19 cases from lung infections. The sensor could also distinguish, with 88% accuracy, between sick and recovered COVID-19 patients. Although the test needs to be validated in more patients, it could be useful for screening large populations to determine which individuals need further testing, the researchers say.

3 Comments

Filed under coronavirus, coronavirus risk

‘Unprecedented’ levels of COVID-19 pandemic trauma studied

The COVID-19 pandemic could inflict long-lasting emotional trauma on an unprecedented global scale, leaving millions grappling with debilitating psychological disorders, according to a new study commissioned by an interdisciplinary team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University.

An illustration, created at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), depicts the 2019 Novel Coronavirus

“There are some valid concerns that this coronavirus pandemic could cause emotional trauma and PTSD at a level we’ve never seen before,” said Megan Holmes, an associate professor of social work and the founding director of the Center on Trauma and Adversity at the university’s Jack, Joseph and Morton Mandel School of Applied Social Sciences. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under COVID-19, global pandemic, pandemic, PTSD, Uncategorized

Depression, anxiety may be side effects of COVID-19

Millions of Americans are being impacted by the psychological fallout from the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic aftermath, and large numbers may experience emotional distress and be at increased risk of developing psychiatric disorders such as depression and anxiety, according to a new article published this week in the New England Journal of Medicine.

person holding yellow and white labeled bottle

Photo by Aleksandar Pasaric on Pexels.com

The Perspective article, co-authored by Carol North, M.D., a UT Southwestern crisis psychiatrist who has studied survivors of disasters including the 9/11 terrorist attacks and Hurricane Katrina, calls on already stretched health care providers to monitor the psychosocial needs of their patients as well as themselves and fellow health care workers during this time. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under anxiety, coronavirus, coronavirus risk, COVID-19, depression, pandemic

Weekend funnies …

It’s Friday already. Have you driven your car lately? Sorry for all the pandemic themed ones. They just seem to breed like rabbits ….

Screen Shot 2020-04-08 at 5.09.45 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-04-08 at 5.09.15 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-04-08 at 5.14.04 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-04-08 at 5.12.44 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-04-08 at 5.08.08 PM.png

Screen Shot 2020-04-08 at 5.13.33 PM.png

I hope you have a safe and  healthy weekend!

Tony

Leave a comment

Filed under coronavirus, pandemic, weekend funnies

Do’s and don’ts of interaction during a pandemic – AHA

Across the nation, Americans find themselves in varying degrees of social isolation as part of a coordinated effort to try to slow the spread of the new coronavirus. Some cities are in full lockdown. Others are asking people to simply remain socially distant.

But navigating this new world of social limitations can be confusing. What should – and shouldn’t – people be doing?

balance body exercise female

Photo by Burst on Pexels.com

That depends on your level of isolation, said Arthur Caplan, director of the Division of Medical Ethics at New York University Grossman School of Medicine.

The most restrictive level, said Caplan, is quarantine – when a person is ill or known to have been exposed to the virus and must be completely separated from others with no social interactions outside the home. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under coronavirus, coronavirus risk, COVID-19, Exercise, exercise benefits, pandemic, social distancing

Hopes for pandemic respite this spring may depend upon what happens indoors

hello spring handwritten paper

Photo by Alena Koval on Pexels.com

The cold, dry air of winter clearly helps SARS-CoV2 — the virus that causes COVID-19 — spread among people, Yale research has shown. But as humidity increases during spring and summer, the risk of transmission of the virus through airborne particles decreases both outside and indoors in places such as offices.

While viruses can still be transmitted through direct contact or through contaminated surfaces as humidity rises, researchers suggest that, in addition to social distancing and hand washing, the seasonal moderation of relative humidity – the difference between outside humidity and temperatures and indoor humidity – could be an ally in slowing rates of viral transmission.

Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under coronavirus, coronavirus risk, COVID-19, pandemic

How to handle social media coronavirus stress – AHA

Pandemic. Politics. An upending of life at a level that few Americans have ever experienced. And all of it amplified by social media.

The ever-shifting news has some people constantly checking their phones for updates – and others saying they’re ready to walk away from their feeds entirely.

photo of a woman thinking

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

“It’s really the perfect recipe for anxiety and panic,” said licensed clinical psychologist Debra Kissen of Chicago. And stress, it should be noted, may be a factor in heart disease.

But Kissen, CEO of Light on Anxiety CBT (cognitive behavioral technology) Treatment Center, and others say anxiety can be managed – and social media, used properly, doesn’t have to send you on a mental-health spiral. It also can help you find balance. Continue reading

6 Comments

Filed under coronavirus, COVID-19, pandemic, stress, stress reduction

A Covid-19 Share

I didn’t write the following, nor am I a doctor, but in the plethora of information on the Covid-19 virus circulating right now, I thought it seemed exceedingly straightforward and helpful. I hope you do, too.

img.png

Tony

3 Comments

Filed under coronavirus, coronavirus risk, COVID-19, pandemic