Tag Archives: mitochondria

High-intensity exercise yields same cell benefits in fewer minutes

Although I personally prefer moderate intensity exercise, maybe it’s my age, I understand that a lot of younger folks are into the high intensity activity. More power to you.

A few minutes of high-intensity interval or sprinting exercise may be as effective as much longer exercise sessions in spurring beneficial improvements in mitochondrial function, according to new research. The small study is published ahead of print in the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology.

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Mitochondria, the energy centers of the cells, are essential for good health. Previous research has found that exercise creates new mitochondria and improves the function of existing mitochondria. Altered mitochondrial function in response to a single session of exercise generates signals that may lead to beneficial changes in the cells, lowering the risk for chronic disease. High-intensity interval exercise consists of short bursts of high-intensity aerobic exercise—physical activity that raises the heart rate—alternating with brief recovery periods. Whether the intensity of a workout affects mitochondrial response is unclear. Continue reading

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Filed under cardio exercise, Exercise, exercise benefits, high intensity interval training, mitochondria

Caffeine From Four Cups of Coffee Protects the Heart With the Help of Mitochondria

I am a coffee drinker and always happy to learn of positive effects to be gleaned from drinking it. As a matter of fact, I pretty much concentrate on decaf, though, because I don’t like to introduce any foreign chemicals into my system if I can help it. Also, I read an article about caffeine withdrawal symptoms that scared me.

Summary: A new study reports caffeine concentration, the equivalent of four cups of coffee, can promote the movement of a regulatory protein into mitochondria. This can enhance mitochondrial function and protect heart cells from damage.
Source: PLOS.

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They found that caffeine induced the movement of p27 into mitochondria, setting off this beneficial chain of events, and did so at a concentration that is reached in humans by drinking four cups of coffee. NeuroscienceNews.com image is in the public domain.

Caffeine consumption has been associated with lower risks for multiple diseases, including type II diabetes, heart disease, and stroke, but the mechanism underlying these protective effects has been unclear. A new study now shows that caffeine promotes the movement of a regulatory protein into mitochondria, enhancing their function and protecting cardiovascular cells from damage. Continue reading

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Exercise can make cells healthier, promoting longer life – Study

Eat less, more more; live longer remains the mantra of this blog. Now comes MedicalPress with a study confirming the move more segment.

Whether it’s running, walking, cycling, swimming or rowing, it’s been well-known since ancient times that doing some form of aerobic exercise is essential to good health and well-being. You can lose weight, sleep better, fight stress and high blood pressure, improve your mood, plus strengthen bones and muscles.

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“Whether muscle is healthy or not really determines whether the entire body is healthy or not,” said Zhen Yan of the University of Virginia School of Medicine. “And exercise capacity, mainly determined by muscle size and function, is the best predictor of mortality in the general population.”

But why? Yan might have some answers. He and colleagues at UVA are peering inside the cell to understand, at a molecular level, why that workout – like it or not – is so vital to the body. They found that one important benefit involves the cellular power plant – the mitochondria – which creates the fuel so the body can function properly.

 

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Filed under aging, brain, Exercise, exercise and brain health, exercise benefits, living longer, longevity, successful aging

Why CoQ10 Is A Super Powerful Antioxidant: A Cardiologist Explains

CoQ10 is made by the human body and may be the most abundant antioxidant in cells producing energy like the heart and brain. In fact, CoQ10 is concentrated right in the mitochondria to counter the free oxygen radicals (rust) produced during energy production.

Our Better Health

BY DR. JOEL KAHN  JULY 29, 2013

Let’s go back to 1981, Ann Arbor, Michigan. I am sitting in a large auditorium in the medical school basement trying to stay awake. The room is warm and there is no ventilation. The lecturer is reviewing the pathways by which the body, and parts of cells, called mitochondria, make energy. I hear Krebs Cycle and electron chain transport and almost doze. ATP, ADP, phosphorylation and then CoQ10 (short for CoenzymeQ 10). A few weeks, there was an exam and I moved on to clinical rotations.

All that biochemistry faded into distant memory for about 25 years.

Fast forward to 2006, and I am browsing the Internet, reading about ways to treat a patient’s advanced congestive heart failure and…..deja vu. A cardiologist was writing about boosting ATP production by using targeted vitamins that made mitochondria run more efficiently.

I read several papers, then…

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Filed under anti oxidant, CoQ10