Tag Archives: mindfulness

Why life can get better as we age — study

As an 80 year old, I have to confess I read about this study with a great deal of personal interest and identification.

People say life gets better with age. Now research suggests this may be because older people have the wisdom and time to use mindfulness as a means to improve well being.

woman wearing red hat and sunglasses

Photo by Nashua Volquez on Pexels.com

Healthy aging researchers at Flinders University say certain characteristics of mindfulness seem more strongly evident in older people compared to younger people – and suggest ways for all ages to benefit.

“This suggests that mindfulness may naturally develop with time and life experience,” says behavioral scientist Associate Professor Tim Windsor, who co-authored a recent study based on an online community survey of 623 participants aged between 18 and 86 years. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under aging, aging myths, mindfulness, successful aging

Mindfulness meditation and relaxation response have different effects on brain function – Study

 

spiromaniac.gif

There are two widely used meditation-based stress reduction courses. One is based on the relaxation response – first described by Herb Benson, MD, director emeritus of the MGH-based Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine – which focuses on eliciting a physiologic state of deep rest, the opposite of the “fight or flight” stress response. The other is Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction, developed by Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD, of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, which emphasizes a particular, non-judgmental attitude termed “mindfulness” as key to stress reduction. Although both interventions are based on meditation, the scientific philosophies and meditative traditions upon which each is founded are different, and these differences are reflected in the instructions and exercises taught to patients.

“If the hypotheses proposed by the programs’ creators are in fact correct, they imply that these programs promote wellness through different mechanisms of action,” says Sara Lazar, PhD, of the MGH Psychiatric Neuroscience Research Program, senior author of the current report and assistant professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School. “Such a finding would suggest that these programs could potentially have different effects on disease.”

Continue reading

2 Comments

Filed under aging brain, brain, brain function, brain health, meditation, mind, mindfulness

Your happiness depends on it.

There are such simple, wonderful concepts here. Including the 3 to 1 positivity ratio in your life can make it so much better.

Tony

1 Comment

Filed under positive lessons, Positive Psychology, positive thinking, positivity

Breathe and Focus: How Practicing Mindfulness Improves Mental Health as We Age — Our Better Health

There are very helpful tips in this post. I would like to add my own suggestion: Exercise. That gives you a two-edged sword. Check out my Page – Important facts about your brain – and exercise benefits.

As we age, it’s natural to worry about possible declines in our mental and brain health. Many older adults are concerned about things like memory loss and poorer attention, forgetting names, and taking longer to learn new things. As a result, as we get older we may feel more distress, sadness, and/ or anxiety that […]

via Breathe and Focus: How Practicing Mindfulness Improves Mental Health as We Age — Our Better Health

Leave a comment

Filed under breathing, Exercise, mindfulness, Uncategorized

What do the longest living people in the world have in common?

Wonderful post full of worthwhile information.

Eat less; move more; live longer. Words to live by.

Tony

Content Catnip

According to a book released in April, entitled Blue Zone Solutions, there’s a methodology to living a long and healthy life.  Author of the book Dan Buettner and CEO of the eponymous organisation spent a decade visiting and studying populations or ‘Blue Zones’ where individuals live inordinately long and healthy lives.

There were some common denominators to how these people lived their lives. They are as follows

  • Physical activity incorporated naturally into their daily lives, i.e. gardening, walking, taking the stairs rather than the lift, working out.
  • Having a sense of purpose, caring for a loved one, volunteering.
  • Low stress levels and a slower pace of life
  • Strong family and community connections
  • A diet of moderate caloric intake from mostly plant sources.

What do the longest living people in the world have in common?

Icaria in Greece 

A tiny dot in the Aegean Sea, people here live on average eight years longer than Americans and experience 20% less cancer, half the rate…

View original post 158 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under life expectancy, living longer, Uncategorized

It’s not just WHAT you eat, but HOW you eat as well.

Excellent ideas here. Let’s take the hurry out of eating.

Tony

Kim the Dietitian's Weblog

DSC00208

How you eat matters.  A recent study supports what seems obvious to me:  a pleasant, relaxing eating experience leads to healthier food choices and better health.

So many people race out the door, grabbing something as they go, or they graze all day long without ever sitting down to enjoy their food.  The study looked at the eating habits of over 1000 college and university students and found that those who prepared food at home and had a set eating schedule ate healthier than those who ate “on the fly,” grabbed food at school or were distracted by video games or TV.

What a shame to miss the experience of eating!  It should be pleasurable; in my opinion, eating is one of the great pleasures of life.  Being more mindful of the experience is not only healthier, but it’s also much more enjoyable.

I know we are all in a hurry, but we can all…

View original post 161 more words

1 Comment

Filed under relaxed eating

Think Like a Tree – Infographic

Stumbled across this somewhere surfing. Thought it was really fine.

ac5361ee110daf3cadccc5cce924bbe6-1

Tony

Leave a comment

Filed under mindfulness