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Cold Facts About Hot Dogs From the Mayo Clinic

“A typical 2-ounce, all beef frank contains 14 to 16 grams (g) of fat, between 150 and 180 calories, 25 to 40 milligrams (mg) of cholesterol, and over 500 mg of sodium, according to Robert D. Sheeler, M.D., Medical Editor of the Mayo Clinic Health Letter.

hot-dogs
He suggests that if you must consume them as a summertime treat, don’t overdo it and consider a hot dog that is:

Fat-free or has less than 2 g of fat — Made of beef, turkey or a mixture of meats, these can deliver a decent-tasting hot dog for 50 calories or less. They have little or no fat and 10 to 15 mg of cholesterol. Still, they typically have well over 400 mg of sodium.

Reduced fat — Made of beef, chicken or turkey, these contain between 7 and 10 g of fat, about 100 to 120 calories, 25 to 55 mg of cholesterol, and typically over 400 mg of sodium. Their taste isn’t necessarily better than that of very low-fat hot dogs. All-poultry hot dogs allow you to avoid red meat, which has been linked to colon cancer when eaten in large quantities.

Meatless — These typically are soy based with between 0 and 6 g of fat, no cholesterol, and 200 to 400 mg of sodium. Taste is subjective, but condiments may be needed to liven up their flavor.

Dr. Sheeler recommends boiling or microwaving your hot dogs as “grilling can cause charring and other changes that have been linked to cancer.”

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Buon Appetito!

Tony

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Filed under eating, fast food, fat, healthy eating, healthy living, hot dog, Mayo Clinic, Mayo Clinic Health Letter, Weight

Tips on Eliminating Meat from your Diet – Mayo Clinic

I haven’t eliminated meat from my diet, but I have cut back sharply. If you are considering either going without meat, or cutting way back, you have probably wondered about what you will be missing in nutrition. Well, Dr. Robert Sheeler, Medical Editor of the Mayo Clinic Health Letter offered some worthwhile tips for just such a situation.

” … if you eliminate or markedly reduce only the meat in your diet, but still consume animal products such as dairy and eggs, and a wide variety of plant-based foods, you should have no problem getting adequate protein, iron, calcium and vitamin B-12.

Not so much ...

Not so much …

“Even a vegan diet — which eliminates all animal-based foods, including dairy and eggs — provides adequate protein and iron if you get enough calories and eat a variety of foods, including soy products, legumes, lentils, nuts, seeds, whole grains, and dark green leafy vegetables.

“The only true nutritional issues for those who adopt a balanced vegan diet are:
•    Calcium — If you don’t consume dairy products, a calcium supplement may be necessary. Other calcium sources include fortified products such as some types of tofu, soy milk, breakfast cereal and fruit juice. Dark green vegetables, such as spinach and broccoli, also contain calcium.

•    Vitamin B-12 — Some foods, such as breakfast cereals, are fortified with vitamin B-12. Still, you may need to take a vitamin supplement to get this important nutrient.
The key to a healthy meatless diet, like any diet, is to enjoy a variety of foods. No single food can provide all the nutrients your body needs.

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Tony

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Filed under health, healthy eating, healthy living, Mayo Clinic, meat, portion control, Weight

Tips on Fighting Off a Cold – Mayo Clinic

I have written repeatedly about the flu and protecting yourself from it this season. It is also worth mentioning that this is cold season as well. A lot of folks are suffering from the common cold.
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The Mayo Clinic has some worthwhile suggestions on fighting a cold virus if you succumb.

Dr. Robert Sheeler, Medical Editor of the Mayo Clinic Health Letter has the following to say about handling cold symptoms.

“Being sick with a cold virus for a week or two doesn’t mean you have to be miserable. These remedies may help:
• Fluids — Drink plenty of liquids. Water, juice, clear broth, or warm water with lemon juice and honey can help loosen congestion.
• Saltwater gargle — To relieve a sore or scratchy throat, gargle with 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon salt dissolved in an 8-ounce glass of warm water. Continue reading

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Some Tips on Cutting Calorie Consumption from the Mayo Clinic

Most folks overeat. That’s why nearly two-thirds of us are overweight and half of them are obese. Dr. Robert D. Sheeler, Medical Editor of the Mayo Clinic Health Letter wrote, “Finding a way to eat fewer calories throughout the day is one of the basic objectives of weight loss or maintaining a healthy weight. While food choice is important, research has also shown that the ways in which food is served and stored — and the environment in which it’s eaten — can be significant factors that can lead you to unknowingly consume unwanted calories.”
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He offered some simple tips to avoid eating more than you want.

“Select smaller bowls, plates, and spoons for serving and eating — Research has shown that people unconsciously eat more food when it’s served in or eaten from larger dishes.”

Indeed, I think one of the most important lessons I learned as far as getting my weight under control was portion control. Know what a serving size is and adhere to it. Get a food scale and use it.

When faced with big bags, measure out a single serving and put the rest back in your cupboard.

When faced with big bags, measure out a single serving and put the rest back in your cupboard.

“Get rid of high-calorie foods or leftovers; store them in an inconvenient location or in opaque containers — Seeing a food item can trigger you to eat it. Plus, easy-to-reach food in a kitchen cabinet is more readily eaten than is food in a basement pantry. Exploit these phenomena by placing healthy, low-calorie foods within sight and easy reach.”

And, finally, “Buy small packages and serve or order smaller quantities — Larger packages or larger portions often lead people to eat more than they would have if the serving or package were smaller.”

This is another variation on the theme of portion control. I have found that when I snack, I need to measure out one serving of the snack and close up the bag or container and put it back in the cupboard. That way, I don’t sit there mindlessly munching my way to a weight problem. This is a perfect use of a food scale.

Dr. Sheeler concludes, “These days, taking care of yourself is a necessity of life — not only to stay healthy but also to avoid rising medical bills if at all possible. We make it our mission to provide practical, easy-to-understand information on topics of interest to millions of health-conscious people like you!”

The Mayo Clinic Store has other products, specialists and editorial staff on hand for more great health information.

Tony

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Some Tips on Avoiding Junk Food – Mayo Clinic

Let’s face it, we are bombarded with junk food every day and all day from the time we get up in the morning till the time we go to sleep at night. Everyone knows the term junk food junkie.

Well, I just got a really good email from Robert D. Sheeler, Medical Editor of the Mayo Clinic Health Letter on the subject. He offers the following tips on a problem many of us need help with, namely, avoiding junk foods.

“Taste is a powerful force. Eating great food with friends and loved ones is one of the great pleasures of life. But at the same time, you’re not a slave to your taste buds.

I wrote about dealing with the nutritiional value of food over the taste of food last year in How to Use Your Brain for Weight Control.

Dr. Sheeler continues:

“You may be able to take control of your diet when your taste buds seem to be getting you into trouble.

“Even if you don’t like the taste of vegetables and fruits, you may be able to incorporate these healthy foods into your diet by:

•    Looking for ripe, in-season strawberries, grapes or dark cherries, as these are often quite sweet.

Much better for us than junk food

Much better for us than junk food

•    Adding vegetables to favorite foods, such as a soup, casserole or pizza. Slice up fresh fruit and put it in your morning cereal or yogurt.

•    Making a fruit smoothie or use a vegetable juicer.

•    Choosing milder offerings, such as carrots, bananas and pears, if bitter or sour flavors are what turn you off.

You can help control an inability to resist sugary, fatty junk food by:

•    Not keeping unhealthy food that you can’t resist in your home. If you do, keep it in very small amounts.

•    Eating healthy foods first, so when it comes time to enjoy a favorite treat, you’re less hungry.

•    Determining in advance how much of a treat you’ll eat and sticking with the plan.

“These days, taking care of yourself is a necessity of life — not only to stay healthy but also to avoid rising medical bills if at all possible. We make it our mission to provide practical, easy-to-understand information on topics of interest to millions of health-conscious people like you!”

I think the good doctor makes some fine suggestions here. Don’t you?

Tony

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Filed under calories, healthy eating, junk food, Mayo Clinic