Tag Archives: low density lipoprotein

Straight Talk on Living Longer from the Mayo Clinic

The monthly Healthletter from the Mayo Clinic has some super suggestions on living longer.

I love that they start their list with one of my favorite subjects – smoking.

They suggest:
Smoking – “behavioral counseling and support groups, along with medications to reduce withdrawal symptoms, are typically the best route to stop smoking.”

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I feel so strongly about smoking being a killer, I put together a special page, available at the top of the screen – How Bad is Smoking? Continue reading

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Filed under aging, blood pressure, Exercise, obesity, overweight, smoking

How to Conquer High Cholesterol – Harvard

If you have been careless in your eating habits and your cholesterol has flourished, don’t give up hope. All is not lost. The Harvard Medical Bulletin Healthbeat says that changing what you eat can lower your cholesterol and improve the fats floating through your bloodstream. Some foods are better than others in bringing down cholesterol.

“Some cholesterol-lowering foods deliver a good dose of soluble fiber, which binds cholesterol and its precursors in the digestive system and drags them out of the body before they get into circulation. Others provide polyunsaturated fats, which directly lower Low-density lipoprotein (LDL). And those with plant sterols and stanols keep the body from absorbing cholesterol. Here are 5 of those foods:

This is what it looks like when you clog your arteries

This is what it looks like when you clog your arteries

1. Oats. An easy way to start lowering cholesterol is to choose oatmeal or a cold oat-based cereal like Cheerios for breakfast. It gives you 1 to 2 grams of soluble fiber. Add a banana or some strawberries for another half-gram.
2. Beans. Beans are especially rich in soluble fiber. They also take a while for the body to digest, meaning you feel full for longer after a meal. That’s one reason beans are a useful food for folks trying to lose weight. With so many choices — from navy and kidney beans to lentils, garbanzos, black-eyed peas, and beyond — and so many ways to prepare them, beans are a very versatile food.
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Filed under Harvard, high cholesterol