Tag Archives: living longer

Increase life expectancy a decade with these five healthy habits – Harvard

Who doesn’t want to live longer? I am impressed every day by the number of much younger followers I am getting on this blog.  Herewith Harvard’s latest on living longer..

Maintaining five healthy habits—eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, keeping a healthy body weight, not drinking too much alcohol, and not smoking—during adulthood may add more than a decade to life expectancy, according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

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Researchers also found that U.S. women and men who maintained the healthiest lifestyles were 82% less likely to die from cardiovascular disease and 65% less likely to die from cancer when compared with those with the least healthy lifestyles over the course of the roughly 30-year study period. Continue reading

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Filed under Exercise, exercise benefits, living longer, longevity, smoking, Smoking dangers, successful aging

Night Owls Have Higher Risk of Dying Sooner – Study

I started taking courses in various aspects of good health and nutrition back eight years ago when I first started working on this blog. I created the Page – How important is a good night’s sleep? in 2013, so regular readers have been hearing about that aspect of good health since at least then. Here, we have a fresh insight into sleep habits that adds to the import of it.

A new study reports being a night owl might have significant consequences for your health, including an increased risk of dying earlier.

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“Night owls” — people who like to stay up late and have trouble dragging themselves out of bed in the morning — have a higher risk of dying sooner than “larks,” people who have a natural preference for going to bed early and rise with the sun, according to a new study from Northwestern Medicine and the University of Surrey in the United Kingdom (UK).

The study, on nearly half a million participants in the UK Biobank Study, found owls have a 10 percent higher risk of dying than larks. In the study sample, 50,000 people were more likely to die in the 6½ -year period sampled.

“Night owls trying to live in a morning lark world may have health consequences for their bodies,” said co-lead author Kristen Knutson, associate professor of neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Continue reading

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What do the longest living people in the world have in common?

Wonderful post full of worthwhile information.

Eat less; move more; live longer. Words to live by.

Tony

Content Catnip

According to a book released in April, entitled Blue Zone Solutions, there’s a methodology to living a long and healthy life.  Author of the book Dan Buettner and CEO of the eponymous organisation spent a decade visiting and studying populations or ‘Blue Zones’ where individuals live inordinately long and healthy lives.

There were some common denominators to how these people lived their lives. They are as follows

  • Physical activity incorporated naturally into their daily lives, i.e. gardening, walking, taking the stairs rather than the lift, working out.
  • Having a sense of purpose, caring for a loved one, volunteering.
  • Low stress levels and a slower pace of life
  • Strong family and community connections
  • A diet of moderate caloric intake from mostly plant sources.

What do the longest living people in the world have in common?

Icaria in Greece 

A tiny dot in the Aegean Sea, people here live on average eight years longer than Americans and experience 20% less cancer, half the rate…

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Move it AND Lose it – IOM

Eat less; move more; live longer

You have read that phrase here a hundred times if you have read it once. Also, you are familiar with the fact that two thirds of us are overweight and half of them are outright obese. Because of that, the government is creating a National Physical Activity Plan.

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In April the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM) two-day workshop on solving the national problem of obesity summarized the state of the science of physical activity in prevention and treatment of obesity and it highlighted strategies to promote physical activities across different segments of the population.

Here are some of the findings:

Keynote speaker James O. Hill Ph.D, Executive Director of and Anschutz Health and Wellness Center at the University of Colorado, said strong evidence indicates that the net impact of adding physical activity to a weight loss program is a total increase in energy expenditure. In other words, most people lose weight. The few who gain weight do so because they increase their energy intake at the same time.

In other words if you eat less and move more and you will lose weight. I add the phrase ‘live longer’ because I would like to get the positive idea of living longer into people’s brains, rather than stopping at the losing weight part. That is the game not the candle.

Hill continued, “There is no magic here,” he said. Even more important than its effects on energy expenditure, in Hill’s opinion, is physical activity’s effect on the regulation of energy balance. He referred to the “amazing science” that has been conducted over the past decade on brain circuitry that regulates food intake and the way physical activity affects that circuitry, with important differences between people who occupy what he called the “regulated zone” versus the “unregulated zone.” People who occupy the regulated zone are physically active, and their bodies match intake and expenditure. People who occupy the unregulated zone, which Hill suspects is the majority of the human population, are physically inactive or not as physically active and their bodies are not doing a good job matching food intake and energy expenditure.

I have covered many of the benefits of exercise here including how the brain benefits from it far beyond the body’s firming muscles and burning fat. I am proud of the information on my Page – Important Facts About Your Brain (and Exercise Benefits). But, this brain circuitry information was news to me. It appears that the vehicle of the body like a car needs to be revved up and blown out on the expressway. You can’t just park it in the garage, or in the case of the body, on the couch, and expect to get peak performance out of it.

Ulf Ekelund, Ph.D, Department of Sports Medicine, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences in Oslo, said that evidence indicates a strong relationship between physical activity and other health outcomes, including all-cause mortality. Increasing physical activity by simply adding 20 minutes of brisk walking a day has shown to reduce risk of mortality by 24 percent in people of normal weight and 16 percent in people who are obese. Ekelund called for a greater focus on promoting physical activity for health rather than for weight.

It was truly gratifying to see professor Ekelund’s words about promoting physical activity for better health not just weight loss.

Tony

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Exercise Whether You Lose Weight or Not – WSJ

As I have written hundreds of times here: eat less; move more; live longer. Notice there is nothing in that statement about losing weight. I know that with almost 70 percent of the population overweight or obese, there is a lot of worry about weight loss. I wish folks would lighten up. No pun intended. If you eat right and exercise, you will be healthy and live longer.

 

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I found a Wall Street Journal article  from early this year on that very subject. Rachel Bachman cited, “A recent study underscores that there are significant health benefits to overweight and obese people being physically active, even if they don’t lose a pound. The study, of 334,000 Europeans over 12 years, recorded twice as many deaths due to a lack of physical activity as due to obesity.”

I have time and again written that the reason most people fail at losing weight and keeping it off is that they have the superficial goal of looking sexy or something like that. If you are healthy you will be sexy whether you appear that way to the object of your affection or not.

She makes another good point with, “Some doctors say the diet industry and popular culture overemphasize weight loss and underemphasize the benefits of exercise for people of any size. Health clubs and fitness studios advertise with images of lean bodies. Many people stop exercising if they’re not losing weight.”

The sooner you can get the superficial appearance thing out of your head the better off you will be.

A good example is Jeanette Patie a certified fitness instructor in Duarte, Calif., speaker and author of “The Fat Chick Works Out!” About 16 years ago, she read a book critical of the diet industry and had an epiphany: “I’m not the only one that fails at this. Almost everyone fails at this.”

“She began seeking out exercise that she enjoyed, and now teaches three or four dance-based exercise classes a week, in addition to walking, biking and doing yoga. She finds that she sleeps better, has more stable moods and gets sick less often.”

There you have it. How many readers can boast sleeping well, stable moods and getting sick less often?

I think it is fascinating that the physical problem of being overweight can best be handled first by making the mental decision to get healthy through good eating and exercise and letting the chips fall where they may.

I wrote Why you should quit trying to lose weight early last year. Check it out. You might find out something worthwhile. One last important point I need to make is that your brain benefits from exercise. Check out my Page – Important facts about your brain – and exercise benefits.

Tony

 

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The Lighter Side of Weight Loss (and Living Longer)

I have added the well-deserved phrase and living longer to the header this week. Please don’t lose sight of the fact that your weight loss efforts should ultimately result in your living longer, not just looking more attractive to the opposite sex.

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As always, the laugh’s on me.

Tony

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Prescription for Living Longer: Spend Less Time Alone

“Not only are we at the highest recorded rate of living alone across the entire century, but we’re at the highest recorded rates ever on the planet,” said Tim Smith, co-author of the study. “With loneliness on the rise, we are predicting a possible loneliness epidemic in the future.”

Cooking with Kathy Man

Ask people what it takes to live a long life, and they’ll say things like exercise, take Omega-3s, and see your doctor regularly.

Now research from Brigham Young University shows that loneliness and social isolation are just as much a threat to longevity as obesity.

“The effect of this is comparable to obesity, something that public health takes very seriously,” said Julianne Holt-Lunstad, the lead study author. “We need to start taking our social relationships more seriously.”

Loneliness and social isolation can look very different. For example, someone may be surrounded by many people but still feel alone. Other people may isolate themselves because they prefer to be alone. The effect on longevity, however, is much the same for those two scenarios.

The association between loneliness and risk for mortality among young populations is actually greater than among older populations. Although older people are more likely to be lonely and…

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10 Habits Of Emotionally Resilient People

happinessRemember, where attention goes, energy flows. So why not cultivate more of what you want instead of what you don’t. There’s always something to be thankful for.

Ultimately, emotional resilience is all about attitude. By practicing these ten responses to stress, you’ll be able to spend more time living with ease and grace, spending more time in the light with fleeting moments of darkness!

For more info on emotional resilience, check out:
Happy people, Happy People Live Longer – Time Magazine, Can I be Happy? Some Super Tools for Handling Stress.

Tony

Our Better Health

BY AMITA PATEL    MAY 11, 2014

Ever notice how some people are stressed during transitions while others can just roll with the punches? It all comes down to emotional resilience. While some of it may be biological, there are ten traits that you can start cultivating today to start living life with less resistance and more ease:

Here are ten things that emotionally resilient people do when faced with a difficult situation:

1. Wait for what’s right instead of acting on what you want right now.

Yup, just like the classic Stanford marshmallow experiment, this is about impulse control — the ability to stop and consider whether you want to act on a desire. For example, when a family member makes you angry, your immediate response might be to lash out. However, impulse control allows you to pause and assess whether that’s really the best course of action in…

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Even Moderate Regular Exercise Can Add Years to Your Life

“It doesn’t take a lot of exercise to dramatically improve the way you age. Even moderate exercise helps neutralize free radicals, boost your immune system and even grow new brain cells,” according to The Washington Post.

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The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services:

Adults 18 to 64 should get:
2.5 hours per week of moderate intensity exercise.
 OR 1.25 hours a week of vigorous aerobic physical activity
 OR Some combination of the above – equivalent episodes of at least 10 minutes spread throughout the week.

Take a good look at those numbers from the Department. Those aren’t big numbers.

The Washington Post referenced a study “Analyzing data for more than 650,000 people, pooled from six existing studies, and tracking them for an average of 10 years (during which time more than 82,000 deaths were recorded), they found that even a little bit of activity seemed to help people live longer. Compared to no physical activity, just 75 minutes of brisk walking per week was associated with an extra 1.8 years of life expectancy after age 40. Bumping that up to 150 minutes a week – the amount currently recommended by the World Health Organization – was associated with 3.4 years of added longevity; walking briskly for 450 minutes a week or more added up to an extra 4.5 years of life. The relationship between weekly physical activity time and longevity began leveling off at about 300 minutes, the study notes.”

So, with a little bit of regular exercise, you can extend your life, reduce your waistline and bolster your brain power, too. What are you waiting for?

Tony

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Filed under aging, brain, Exercise, living longer, walking, Weight, weight control, weight loss

Getting a Hobby Can Help You Live Longer – Study

Over the past few years of writing this blog I have spent a lot of words on the value of eating intelligently and exercising regularly to help control your weight and to age well. So, it is interesting to see that there is a positive relationship between hobby activity with mortality and frailty among community-dwelling elderly adults, according to a study by the department of Public Health Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan.

Bonsai tree

Bonsai tree

On its face, this may seem outside our criteria of diet and exercise, but anything that may lead toward more healthy aging is worth looking into. Also, in previous posts on the brain (regardless of age) it has been shown that there are many benefits to mental activities. Learning anything new is beneficial to the individual on a physical and mental level. Certainly pursuing a hobby would qualify. You can click on the brain tags at the right for further info.

The study was seeking to identify factors that influence health status among elderly adults in Japan. It included over 2000 individuals between 65 and 84 years old. Questions on hobby activities were from 4 categories: solitary physical, group physical, solitary cultural, and group cultural activities.

They found that the folks who participated in hobby activity had a markedly lower mortality rate and also less chance of becoming bedridden.

Their conclusion was that the findings may be important for programs that seek to promote health among elderly adults since the proportion of Japanese adults aged 65 and older is predicted to increase.

On a personal level, you don’t need to cultivate Bonsai trees, there are lots of areas worth pursuing. Look into your own interests. No one knows better than you what kind of hobby can captivate your interest.

Tony

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