Tag Archives: eggs

Want to cut down on meat-eating? Here are alternatives from Tufts

If you are feeling uncomfortable with the amount of meat you are eating, but don’t want to short yourself on protein, here are some good alternative ideas from Tufts Medical Center.

hamburger with egg and vegetable

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A. Katie Fort, a dietetic intern at Frances Stern Nutrition Center at Tufts Medical Center, explains: “There is a growing body of data that demonstrates the health benefits of eating less meat and more plant-based foods. Though meat is an excellent source of protein, you get adequate amounts of protein from other foods. Here are some good ones: Continue reading

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Tufts on eggs and dairy

When I was a reporter on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, one of the markets I covered was the Shell Egg Futures market. In that capacity I spoke with egg industry people regularly and found myself eating eggs regularly. Being posted on the exchange floor, it was often handy for me to bring a couple of hard boiled eggs to have for lunch as I couldn’t really leave the Exchange during trading hours. I confess to being a big fan of the incredible edible egg.

basket board calcium cheese

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Eggs and dairy products are excellent protein sources. Eggs were off the menu for many years for people with elevated cholesterol levels because of their high cholesterol content. However, the latest research has determined that dietary cholesterol (cholesterol from food) doesn’t actually raise blood cholesterol levels for most people, although the saturated fat found in most high-cholesterol foods might. Other research has shown that egg consumption is not significantly associated with a higher risk of coronary artery disease or type 2 diabetes. Continue reading

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Harvard on the health aspects of eggs

Don’t feel bad for harboring any confusion about just how healthy or unhealthy eggs are in your diet. There has been a lot of information and, it turns out, some misinformation about the little chicken nuggets over the years. So, to put it eggs-actly straight here is the latest from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Long-vilified for their high cholesterol content by well-meaning doctors and scientists researching heart disease, eggs now seem to be making a bit of a comeback. So what changed?

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While it’s true that just one egg yolk has 200 mg of cholesterol—making it one of the richest sources of dietary cholesterol—eggs also contain additional nutrients that may help lower the risk for heart disease. In addition, the moderate amount of fat in an egg, about 5 grams, is mostly monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat. It’s also crucial to distinguish between dietary cholesterol and cholesterol in the blood, which are only weakly related. The focus on dietary cholesterol alone was de-emphasized as more attention was placed on the influence of saturated and trans fat on blood cholesterol. Accordingly, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015 removed the prior recommendation to limit consumption of dietary cholesterol to 300 mg per day.

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High cholesterol intake and eggs do not increase risk of memory disorders

I am now and  have been for years a big fan of eggs. A hundred years ago, it seems, I worked on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange trading floor where I covered the egg futures market along with pork bellies, live cattle and live hog futures. In that capacity, I learned a great deal about eggs from their production to our consumption. I have posted on them numerous times. Here are a few: Eating eggs is good for you. I wrote that in the first month of this blog’s existence. Feel free to type e-g-g-s in the search box at the right to read more posts on eggs.

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A new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows that a relatively high intake of dietary cholesterol, or eating one egg every day, is not associated with an elevated risk of dementia or Alzheimer’s disease. Furthermore, no association was found in persons carrying the APOE4 gene variant that affects cholesterol metabolism and increases the risk of memory disorders. APOE4 is common in Finland. The findings were published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Continue reading

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Reputation Re-haul: 5 Fattening Foods That Are Actually Good For You

Some really good ideas here. This is a good reminder how we always need to think for ourselves (not just about nutrition) and make our own decisions.

To read further on avocados, check out my posts:

Are Avocados Good for You?
Chicken Avocado Sandwich by Mr. Lazy Cook
What are the Best Foods for my Brain?

More on eggs:

Eating Eggs is Good for You
Health Benefits of Chicken Eggs
Eating Eggs is Good for Weight Loss – WebMD

Tony

Good-For-You-Foods-With-A-Bad-RepEveryday, there is someone out there that is unnecessarily avoiding certain foods. They don’t have an allergy and they don’t dislike the food, but in the name of weight loss or health, they are choosing to discriminate against them.

Blogs, news outlets and media figures like Dr. Oz are busy using scare tactics about perfectly-good-for-you foods, and with far fetched promises of shedding 20 pounds in a week. Some processed foods are marketed as “healthy” but they are far from it (see one of my previous posts) while other foods are given a bad reputation, sometimes based on studies that are simply taken out of context. Well I’m here to tell you that unless you have a real food allergy or intolerance, you shouldn’t be avoiding these whole foods based on what the uninformed word is on the street.

Below is a list of 5 foods that you may…

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20 Snacks That Burn Fat – Infographic

Everybody does it. Who doesn’t like to snack? It can make a football game more fun to watch, but it can submarine your best laid weight loss plans. I hope you enjoy this snacking infographic. To read more detail on snacking check out my Page – Snacking – The Good, The Bad and The Ugly. With apologies to Sergio Leone.

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Tony

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The Best Foods for Body and Brain – Infographic

The principles of what to eat for better brain function are relevant to all of us. In the real world, we have pop quizzes every day of our life. They just don’t affect our grade point average any more.

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To read further on sleep check out:

Making Sleep Count
How Important is a Good Night’s Sleep?
16 Things You Didn’t Know About Sleep – Infographic
Defeat Insomnia and Sleep Easy with These Top Foods
How About 30 Insane Facts About Sleep? – Infographic

Stress is another subject I have written posts on:
Stress Will Kill You
9 Ways To Avoid Killer Stress
It’s Not Stress That Kills You: It’s How You Handle It
Stress: It Should Never be Ignored!
Super Tools for Handling Stress
Tony

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Top 10 Foods That Burn Belly Fat – Infographic

On the premise that one picture is worth a thousand words, herewith a killer graphic on burning off your belly fat.

top_10_foods_that_burn_belly_fat

Belly fat is no laughing matter at least to the possessor. To read further, check out:
What About Belly Fat – Central Obesity?
How Dangerous is a Big Belly?
What are the best and worst foods for belly fat?
How Bad is Extra Belly Fat?

Tony

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8 Benefits of Eating Eggs – Infographic

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What seems like a hundred years ago, I was a young reporter on the floor of the Chicago Mercantile Exchange covering, among other markets, the Shell Egg Futures market. As a result I daily came in contact with folks in the egg industry. I started eating eggs regularly and my health did not suffer in any way. If you want to read further about the benefits of eating eggs, check out this post: Is it Healthy to Eat Eggs Regularly?

Tony

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8 Healthy Breakfast Ideas

There’s no rule that breakfast has to consist of food specifically designated for that meal. In fact, last night’s leftovers may be perfect. That’s because most people consume about 50 to 60 percent of their total daily protein at dinner, and shifting those calories to the morning may have health benefits.

Cooking with Kathy Man

1. Front-load your calories

Aim to consume 20 percent to 25 percent of your total daily calories at breakfast (up to 400 calories for women, up to 500 for men, and a bit more for vigorous exercisers). Research shows that it increases levels of the satiety hormone PYY, helping you to feel full, and may reduce the number of calories you consume at lunch, according to Heather Leidy, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the department of nutrition and exercise physiology at the University of Missouri, Columbia. It may also help you avoid overeating later in the day, which may lead to weight gain.

2. Think protein

The latest research suggests that eating protein first thing in the morning is crucial. Having 24 to 35 grams may help prevent weight gain and promote weight loss by stabilizing your blood sugar, decreasing your appetite, and making you feel full. Morning protein also…

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How Important is Breakfast?

Let’s start with the word – breakfast. You are breaking your fast after shutting your body down in sleep all night. So, your body is ready to be nourished and made whole again. There is a need for fuel. Skipping breakfast robs your body of basic needs and puts it on the defensive right from the start. Why handicap yourself like that?

As everyone who has skipped or skimped on breakfast knows, you get hungry long before lunch time rolls around. That often means you end up snacking on convenient junk foods high in fat and sugars. You can read my Love Letter to Hostess Ho Ho’s NOT for all the reasons to avoid junk food.

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WebMD in a slideshow on brain foods said, “Tempted to skip breakfast? Studies have found that eating breakfast may improve short-term memory and attention. Students who eat it tend to perform better than those who don’t. Foods at the top of researchers’ brain-fuel list include high-fiber whole grains, dairy, and fruits. Just don’t overeat; researchers also found high-calorie breakfasts appear to hinder concentration.”

I recommend including some protein in your breakfast to extend the benefits.

“Protein blunts your hunger the most, and is the most satiating,” Purdue University researcher Wayne Campbell, PhD,  tells WebMD. Eggs are a natural, low in calories and high in vitamins, minerals and protein.

Don’t sweat the cholesterol.

I wrote the following in my post, What is the Food Value of Easter Eggs? “The yolk of the egg contains many excellent nutrients as well as cholesterol. Don’t forget that your body needs cholesterol to function. If you don’t have enough of it in your diet, your body will manufacture it. Organic Foods says, “Recent research has also shown that consuming eggs does not lead to increase in serum cholesterol levels,”

So, do yourself and your body a favor and make time for a good breakfast, you will reap rewards from it all day long.

Tony

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Eating Eggs is Good for Weight Loss – Web MD

There are experts on both sides of the question of eggs, I wrote an extended blog post back in January Is it healthy to eat eggs regularly that discusses this in detail. I also disclosed that for years I have eaten a hard-boiled egg every morning with no ill effects. So, I come down on the side of eggs, especially boiled as opposed to fried. As far as I am concerned a boiled egg is hard to beat. (Intended.)

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WebMD has a slideshow on bad foods that are good for weight loss and it leads off with eggs. I guess that the ‘bad’ element is the cholesterol question.

Here is what WebMD says in favor of eggs, “When it comes to healthy eating, few foods have sparked as much debate as eggs. The latest research suggests an egg a day is safe and nutritious for most adults — and if you eat that egg for breakfast, you’ll boost your odds of losing weight. The reason: Eggs are packed with protein, which takes time to digest. Eating protein in the morning keeps your stomach full, so you eat less during the rest of the day.” Continue reading

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Tips on Eliminating Meat from your Diet – Mayo Clinic

I haven’t eliminated meat from my diet, but I have cut back sharply. If you are considering either going without meat, or cutting way back, you have probably wondered about what you will be missing in nutrition. Well, Dr. Robert Sheeler, Medical Editor of the Mayo Clinic Health Letter offered some worthwhile tips for just such a situation.

” … if you eliminate or markedly reduce only the meat in your diet, but still consume animal products such as dairy and eggs, and a wide variety of plant-based foods, you should have no problem getting adequate protein, iron, calcium and vitamin B-12.

Not so much ...

Not so much …

“Even a vegan diet — which eliminates all animal-based foods, including dairy and eggs — provides adequate protein and iron if you get enough calories and eat a variety of foods, including soy products, legumes, lentils, nuts, seeds, whole grains, and dark green leafy vegetables.

“The only true nutritional issues for those who adopt a balanced vegan diet are:
•    Calcium — If you don’t consume dairy products, a calcium supplement may be necessary. Other calcium sources include fortified products such as some types of tofu, soy milk, breakfast cereal and fruit juice. Dark green vegetables, such as spinach and broccoli, also contain calcium.

•    Vitamin B-12 — Some foods, such as breakfast cereals, are fortified with vitamin B-12. Still, you may need to take a vitamin supplement to get this important nutrient.
The key to a healthy meatless diet, like any diet, is to enjoy a variety of foods. No single food can provide all the nutrients your body needs.

“Want more great health information? Visit the store now to see the latest products from Mayo Clinic doctors, specialists and editorial staff.”

Tony

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Filed under health, healthy eating, healthy living, Mayo Clinic, meat, portion control, Weight

Is it Healthy to Eat Eggs Regularly?

Not long ago a study published in the journal Athersclerosis reported that the more egg yolks a people ate the thicker their artery walls became. That indicates a higher risk of heart disease. Also, the effect was nearly as bad as from smoking cigarettes. The Egg Nutrition Center and American Egg Board voiced other ideas.

The incredible edible egg

The incredible edible egg

Researchers measured the buildup of carotid plaque in the arteries of 1,231 subjects. The men and women in the study were all patients at cardiovascular health clinics. For comparison’s sake, the team also measured the carotid plaque buildup of smokers in the study.

Plaque buildup increased according to age – after age 40 in a fairly steady fashion. But among the 20 percent of participants who reported eating the most egg yolks – three or more per week – carotid plaque increased “exponentially,” according to the study. The buildup equaled about two-thirds of that seen among the heaviest smokers in the group.

Arterial plaque buildup is a major risk factor for heart attack and stroke; as plaque accumulates on artery walls, it narrows the space through which blood can pass, making the heart’s job of pumping more difficult. Moreover, plaque buildups can break away from the arterial wall, forming clots that can do terrible, even fatal, damage if they reach the heart or brain.

For the record, here is the nutritional breakdown of a large (56 gram) egg from SELFNutritionData:

Calories 80
Total Fat 6 grams
Saturated Fat 2 grams
Cholesterol 237 mg
Sodium 78 mg
No Carbohydrates
No Fiber
No Sugar
Protein 7 grams

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Filed under aging, arterial plaque, arteries, blood pressure, body fat, calories, eggs, Exercise, fast food, fat, portion size, protein, Weight

What’s in a Traditional English Breakfast?

One meal I was determined to try while in London was a traditional English breakfast. My wife, who has lived in Britain, and a British coworker now in Chicago, had each told me about the breakfast tradition. I had little time to go looking for a traditional English breakfast during a week of meetings but I made a point to get one my last morning in London.

A London-based coworker had told be about a place near my hotel where I could get one for 6 British pounds, or about $9. A traditional English breakfast

I was sitting in the breakfast place wondering how she knew about it even though it wasn’t near our office but then I saw her outside walking to work and realized it was on her daily route from her train to work! Continue reading

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How Well Do Eggies Work?

Mr. Lazy Cook loves hard boiled eggs and eats one every day. Anyone who has ever eaten a hard boiled egg knows that peeling the skin off can be frustrating. For that reason when he saw the ad for Eggies on TV which eliminates peeling the skin, he ordered Eggies immediately.

CRACK, BOIL, TWIST Those are the words from the TV ad and also what the box says and shows. What could be simpler? If it truly were CRACK, BOIL, TWIST, the Eggies gadget might be super. Sadly, Eggies aren’t all they’re cracked up to be.

The Eggies box and one of the Eggies in its four parts

Mr. Lazy Cook was very disappointed. Once you open the box, the directions add a new procedure immediately. You must place oil inside each of the little Eggies before you put the egg inside. On TV the voice over says the special non-stick surface allows the cooked egg to come right out, but the surface  isn’t non-stick at all. You have to coat it with oil. So it should be APPLY OIL, CRACK, BOIL, TWIST for starters.

After washing each of the Eggies out, Mr. Lazy Cook was dismayed to learn that an Eggie isn’t a simple cup as pictured on the box. It comes in four pieces and they screw together very delicately. This is no small consideration. The pieces have to be seated perfectly or the Eggies will leak, but it proved very difficult to get the pieces together.

The first thing you find in the box, but never even hinted at in the commercial

I decided to cook up a batch of six Eggies hard-boiled eggs. It took me about 15 minutes to get the four pieces of each Eggie to screw together accurately. This was extremely frustrating and the precision of the process was never mentioned in the Eggies ad.

Secondly, because the Eggies are thicker than egg shells, it took longer to cook the eggs. Normally, my hard-boiled eggs cook 7 minutes and 25 seconds. But it was clear to me that the eggs weren’t cooked nearly enough at that time, so I added minutes in two-minute intervals. They ended up cooking for over 11 minutes. So, prep time increased and so did cooking time. Not much of a time saver.

When I finished, I let them set and cool for several more minutes as the directions stated. I then unscrewed the Eggies, again with some difficulty, and removed the eggs. Unfortunately, I seem to have under-oiled several of them and the eggs stuck to the inside. This possibility is never mentioned any where.

One last item not mentioned: The six Eggies were now apart and I had to wash and dry all 24 pieces before putting them away. I think it took me another five minutes to get the pieces clean which involved scrubbing with a brush to remove some of the egg stuck to various pieces.

Bottomline: The ad was terribly misleading about the complexity of using the Eggies. Even though I now have six cooked eggs that have no skins, I worked much harder to prepare them than if I had simply boiled up six eggs in a pot of water.

I suggest you don’t shell out good money for Eggies. Mr. Lazy Cook was less than eggs-cited about them, and that’s no yolk.

I got a Return Authorization from Amazon.com and sent the box back today. I bought them from Amazon instead of the TV Offer because I am constantly being confused by those people. Once I ordered a dog toy for my pooch for $9.95. There was a second one free for shipping only, so I ordered one for my daughter. Later, when I checked my credit card, I had been charged $69.95. Needless to say, I cancelled that order, too.

Someone suggested to me putting a teaspoon of baking soda into the water before boiling the eggs and there would be less sticking to the shell. It seems to be working so far. Yet another reason to pass on buying the Eggies.

You might also want to check out Another idea better than Eggies.

Seems there is a song that goes something like, “Don’t go bacon my heart. I couldn’t if I fried” or something like that.
Tony

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Filed under eggs, healthy eating, lazy cook, Weight