Tag Archives: diet

Eventually Something Will Give

I like this simple analogy. If folks were as scrupulous about maintaining their bodies as they are about their cars, we might not have the horrible healthcare situation we do with 60 per cent overweight, 30 per cent obese and teenagers coming down with adult onset diabetes.

Check out my post – What Have You Done For Me Lately? – for more details.

Eat less; move more; live longer.

Tony

Dream Big, Dream Often

Eventually something will give.  I often think about this when I see a car that is obviously being neglected.  Smoking out the tail pipe, bald tires and in need of a tune up.  Why does the owner continue to drive their car into the ground?  Do they realize that the short-term cost of maintenance far outweighs the devastation of long-term neglect?  Also, driving the car in a neglected state can put their life and families’ lives in danger.

credit: genius.com credit: genius.com

Obviously they have never considered these dangers, because it makes no sense to be aware of the danger, yet continue to subject their families to the risk.

And so it is with our health.  We only have one body in which we live.  I am not saying to completely eliminate donuts and lattes.  After all I have been very honest about my love affair with Burger King.  What I am saying is…

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The Science of Weight Loss – Infographic

Although this says “weight loss” in the headline, the first illustration makes clear that integrating exercise and intelligent eating – lifestyle change – is the most effective method. If you get yourself into living a healthy life you won’t have to even think about weight loss.

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How the 80/20 Rule Can Help Improve Your Health and Life

This is a wonderful organizing principle that you can apply to so many areas of your life.

In terms of your health, I love the idea that you work on getting healthier and get past the superficial idea of losing weight. If you live healthy,  you won’t need to lose weight.

Eat less; move move, live longer.

Autumn Walk

Tony

Our Better Health

Chris Freytag      03/14/2015       National fitness expert, speaker, contributor to Prevention magazine, author of several books and fitness DVDs

Okay, short history lesson – don’t let your eyes glaze over. Have you heard of the 80/20 rule? It’s also called the law of the vital few and was originally called The Pareto Principle. It started way back in the early 1900s when Vilfredo Pareto discovered that 80 percent of the land in Italy was owned by 20 percent of the people. Am I making you feel like you are back in school? Stay with me!

Soon people saw how this rule played out in business. More often than not, 20 percent of your customers lead to most, or 80 percent, of your sales. Today the 80/20 rule has all sorts of cool interpretations.

To use the 80/20 rule for business, you focus on the 20 percent…

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9  Powerful Eating Habits to Protect Your Brain From Alzheimer’s

This post hit home with my having lost two family members to Alzheimer’s and dementia.

Besides these powerful eating habits, don’t forget the role of exercise in brain health. Check out my Page – Important Facts About Your Brain (and Exercise Benefits).

Tony

Our Better Health

Everything from how you cook meat to what you eat for dessert
can play a role in your brain health.

Here, how to eat to prevent dementia and Alzheimer’s.

by Kenneth S. Kosik, MD

There is no one best dietary pattern when it comes to eating for optimum brain health. Nor is there one magical food or supplement. Instead, a wide range of eating patterns—Asian eating, the MIND diet, the Mediterranean diet, vegan eating—has been shown to protect your brain. Although those eating patterns vary—for example, some include meat, others don’t; some place a heavy emphasis on fish, others suggest no fish—they all tend to have one thing in common: a preponderance of antioxidant-rich plant foods.

Plants manufacture antioxidant chemicals to protect themselves from ultra- violet light and disease. When we eat these plants—in the form of fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds, and grains—we consume this built-in protection, and their…

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How the Average Person Gains Weight

Regular readers have read here more times than I can mention that 60 percent of us are overweight and of those half are outright obese. We really are a nation of bad eaters and under-exercisers.

Here’s how that comes about, generally speaking:
The average American will add about a pound of weight each year starting from age 25. So, from 25 to 65 years old, the average person adds 35 pounds. However, there is more to the story than just that. UNLESS the average person is physically active, he is losing about a further half pound of bone and muscle mass each year, too. So, our body fat increases 1.5  pounds each year from 25 to 60 years old.

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Some Food for Thought – Infographics

I stumbled across these surfing the web this morning. Thought you might like them.

Here is something to think about when tempted …

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Doesn’t this sound like something worth trying?

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I don’t remember ever hearing this one before, but I love it.

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Tony

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Diet + Exercise = Success

I wanted to run this because, first of all, I thought it was beautiful and, second, it really got an important message across. It seems most people want to lose weight because they want to look better. Unfortunately, I think that is superficial and one of the reasons that more than 60 percent of us are overweight and 30 percent of us outright obese. The idea is to get healthy. The weight will take care of itself. This picture shows you the ratio. You don’t just tack on some health club time and slim down. You integrate exercise into your daily life, eat intelligently and your weight problems will disappear.

Diet

If you want a good rundown of how to do it, check out my Page – How to Lose Weight and Keep it off. It has worked for me for the past five years. It can work for you, too.

Tony

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How to Lose Weight Without Dieting or Exercising – Try Earthing

No, I haven’t lost my mind. Regular readers know that the mantra of this blog is: eat less; move more. I still absolutely recommend those activities. However, I have recently learned of a practice that seemingly gives you a positive weight loss return for almost no effort.

Interested?

We need to flashback in time a bit. Earlier this month, on July 9 and again on July 14 I wrote about my experiences with Earthing. “What is Earthing? The book Earthing available from Amazon as you can see from the link, says Earthing is walking barefoot outside on wet grass or sand. This allows one to experience the healing powers of the earth simply by touching it.” I wrote that on July 9.

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The book reports on a study of 30 healthy rats split into two groups. One group was housed in cages with earthing mats. The control group was not.

According to the book, “The control animals lived in similar, but ungrounded, cages. Blood samples were taken every month for six months and analyzed. Continued grounding resulted in progressive improvements….

“While abdominal obesity was not measured during the rat study above, the animals were weighed in at the first pre-test day and then again at each monthly blood collection time The random difference in average weight between the two groups of middle-aged female rats at the beginning of the study was only 1.2 percent (the ungrounded rodents happened to be insignificantly heavier at the start than the grounded animals) and then grew steadily each month to reach 3.7 percent after six months, the last date that we have received data in this ongoing study. What the numbers mean is that the ungrounded group added an extra 2.6 percent in weight after six months. Both groups were fed the same type and quantity of food. While the difference seems like a trifling amount, it translates to an extra five pounds for a person weighing 200 pounds. ”

It seems logical from this study that just practicing Earthing is enough to ratchet up the burn rate in one’s metabolism. As you can see from the rat numbers, that can amount to several pounds applied to a human being.

Now no one is trying to get you off your diet and exercise program to steal a few pounds. However, if you were to integrate Earthing into your current diet and exercise program it seems you could expect to see even better results.

I am beginning my second month of Earthing. I sleep on an Earthing half sheet, rest my bare feet on an Earthing mat and walk barefooted on grass and sand when I take my dog for walks or when I take breaks from riding my bike. As a result of that activity, I can report postiive results in several areas. I fall asleep more quickly and sleep sounder than I did before starting Earthing. I am experiencing a slight improvement in the arthritis that plagues both my hands. I can report improved digestion and my resting heart rate has declined slightly from the already lower than 50 beats per minute rate.

You can read my Beginner’s Guide to Earthing, Parts One and Two for more details and some very informative videos.

Tony

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Insights into Heart Health – Mayo Clinic

Not long ago I posted some logistical suggestions from Harvard on aging. Now comes the Mayo Clinic with some excellent internal insights.

“As you age, your heart rate becomes slightly slower and your heart might become bigger. Your blood vessels and your arteries also become stiffer, causing your heart to work harder to pump blood through them. This can lead to high blood pressure (hypertension) and other cardiovascular problems.

healthy-heart

“What you can do
 to promote heart health:
Include physical activity in your daily routine. Try walking, swimming or other activities you enjoy. Regular moderate physical activity can help you maintain a healthy weight, lower blood pressure and lessen the extent of arterial stiffening.

Eat a healthy diet. Choose vegetables, fruits, whole grains, high-fiber foods and lean sources of protein, such as fish. Limit foods high in saturated fat and sodium. A healthy diet can help you keep your heart and arteries healthy.

Don’t smoke. Smoking contributes to the hardening of your arteries and increases your blood pressure and heart rate. If you smoke or use other tobacco products, ask your doctor to help you quit.

Manage stress. Stress can take a toll on your heart. Take steps to reduce stress — or learn to deal with stress in healthy ways.”

It’s true that everyone already knows all of these but I think it is good to have them repeated by a reputable source to get us going in the right direction.

These are part of a Mayo Clinic page on healthy aging that covers bones, memory and other aspects of it.

Tony

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300813 Diet, obesity and your heart health

Being obese with a BMI greater than or equal to 30 places you at a greater risk for cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes. If over the years you found that you have been gaining weight, now is the time to start cutting back on your calories and adding some exercise to your daily health plan.

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I have written numerous posts on obesity:

Overweight and obesity quiz

What is central obesity?

How does obesity affect you?

What states have the most obesity?

How dangerous is a big belly?

What is the co$t of obe$ity?

Tony

Explosivelyfit Strength Training, LLC

Diet, obesity and your heart health

What you eat has a definite role in how healthy your heart is. Too much salt is a major dietary failure in our society.

One habit that can help to reduce your risk of hypertension and stroke is to cut back on your sodium intake (this means you, Dad and Joyce). The recommended daily limit is 1500 milligrams for anyone over 50, all Blacks and anyone with hypertension, diabetes, or kidney disease, which in our country is almost everyone with one of these diseases. Fifteen hundred mg is about two thirds of a teaspoon of salt. If you don’t have one of the aforementioned diseases then aim for less than 2300 mg per day.

This should not be a hard task to accomplish but in order to do so you do have to cut back on processed foods, restaurant meals, and especially fast food…

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Should You Try a Gluten-Free Diet?

A popular diet myth is that everyone can benefit from a gluten-free diet. It can give you more energy and is anti-inflammatory. Sales of gluten-free products increased 16 percent in 2010.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition in which the body can’t digest gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Less than two percent of the population suffers from celiac disease. So, the odds are that you don’t. Nonetheless, there are hundreds of Gluten-Free products.
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The Mayo Clinic says, “A gluten-free diet is used to treat celiac disease. Gluten causes inflammation in the small intestines of people with celiac disease. Eating a gluten-free diet helps people with celiac disease control their signs and symptoms and prevent complications.”

If you don’t have a medical reason for following a gluten-free diet, there is no benefit, according to Erin McCarthy, MS, RD, LDN at theCenter for Lifestyle Medicine at Northwestern Memorial Hospital.

The Mayo Clinic also pointed out, “People who follow a gluten-free diet may have low levels of certain vitamins and nutrients in their diets. Many grains are enriched with vitamins. Avoiding grains with a gluten-free diet may mean eating fewer of these enriched products.

So, if it ain’t broke don’t fix it. A gluten-free diet is very difficult to adhere to and you will likely get no direct benefit from it for your troubles.

Tony

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Four Insights on Erectile Dysfunction – Harvard

As a sports fan and viewer of ESPN, I have been caught in the deluge of erectile dysfunction (ED) ads that proliferate on these TV venues. Who hasn’t heard the litany of Cialis, Viagra, Levitra, etc.? It seems you can’t help but conclude that a lot of the guys watching sports have a problem with ED.

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Harvard has a publication for sale on the subject.

By way of introduction to it, Harvard offered the following four observations on ED.

“1. ED is often the result of diseases or conditions that become more common with age — or a side effect of the medications used to treat them. Other possible causes of ED include prostate surgery, stress, relationship problems, and depression.
2. Other age-related factors can affect a man’s ability to have an erection — tissues become less elastic and nerve communication slows. But even these factors don’t explain many cases of ED.
3. Cardiovascular disease is a common cause of ED. Clogged arteries (atherosclerosis) affect not only the blood vessels of the heart, but those throughout the body as well. In fact, in up to 30% of men who see their doctors about ED, the condition is the first hint that they have cardiovascular disease.
4. Intriguing findings from the Massachusetts Male Aging Study suggest there may be a natural ebb and flow to ED — that is, for some men, trouble with erections may occur, last for a significant amount of time, and then partly or fully disappear without treatment.”

They conclude with the following positive thought: “Regardless of the cause, ED often can be effectively addressed. For some men, simply losing weight may help. Others may need medications, and there are other options available as well. Given the variety of therapies available, the possibility of finding the right solution is greater than ever.”

From the above list, it appears that age and diet have a lot to do with the problem. Must confess that number four was a surprise. I hadn’t known that ED could come and go, so to speak.

If you want to find out more about the subject, check out the link.

Tony

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Diet May Not Impact Certain Health Outcomes in Older Persons

Fascinating study. I wish they had thought to include exercise practices.

Cooking with Kathy Man

Eating diets high in sugar and fat may not affect the health outcomes of older adults ages 75 and up, suggesting that placing people of such advanced age on overly restrictive diets to treat their excess weight or other conditions may have little benefit, according to researchers at Penn State and Geisinger Healthcare System.

“Historically people thought of older persons as tiny and frail,” said Gordon Jensen, head of the Department of Nutritional Sciences at Penn State, “but that paradigm has changed for many older persons. Currently, 30 percent or more may be overweight, and by 2030, almost 30 percent are projected to be obese, not just overweight. Recent reports even suggest that there may be survival benefits associated with overweight and mild obesity status among the elderly.”

“We all know that adverse dietary patterns, such as a Western diet containing high amounts of fat or a diet containing high…

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Have You Ever Bought a Ferrari?

She makes some fine points here about taking care of our bodies. I wrote something similar about a year ago entitled “What Have You Done For Me Lately?

Tony

Training For Life

Have you ever bought a Ferrari?

Well, maybe not a Ferrari, but a great car, or the latest phone, or an expensive watch. Or, for that matter, anything that costs a bit of money? What do we do once we invest in expensive gadget/gizmos? We ensure good maintenance. In fact, we go to great lengths to ensure GREAT maintenance. We buy the best possible insurance policy, upgrade, service, fuel up, buy protective gear, shine, polish and basically spend a whole lot more money, time and energy on protecting our worldly investment. We are talking about a piece of metal here. A car that can be repaired, even replaced if need be.

Lets take the human body. The phenomenal human body. How much do you think it should cost? Remember we have only one body. It serves us all our lives. We need it to work for us 24/7 through all…

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