Tag Archives: dental plaque

Could this plaque identifying toothpaste prevent a heart attack or stroke?

Study shows Plaque HD® significantly reduces inflammation throughout the body

For decades, researchers have suggested a link between oral health and inflammatory diseases affecting the entire body — in particular, heart attacks and strokes. Inflammation is intimately involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and is accurately measured by high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), a sensitive marker for future risks of heart attacks and strokes.

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Researchers from Florida Atlantic University’s Schmidt College of Medicine, Marshfield Clinic Research Institute, and the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, collaborated on a randomized trial titled, “Correlation between Oral Health and Systemic Inflammation” (COHESION), to further explore whether Plaque HD®, a plaque identifying toothpaste, reduces hs-CRP. Continue reading

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Filed under dental plaque, heart attack, inflammation, oral health, stroke

I wonder if adding a mouthrinse to my Waterpik would have the same result.

Cooking with Kathy Man

New research published in the January/February 2013 issue of General Dentistry, the peer-reviewed clinical journal of the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), indicates that the use of a germ-killing mouthrinse in addition to regular toothbrushing can significantly reduce plaque and gingivitis, more so than brushing alone.

“It’s simple—mouthrinses can reach nearly 100 percent of the mouth’s surfaces, while brushing focuses on the teeth, which make up only 25 percent of the mouth,” says Christine A. Charles, RDH, BS, lead author of the study and director of Scientific and Professional Affairs, Global Consumer Healthcare Research and Development, Johnson & Johnson Consumer and Personal Products Worldwide. “Even with regular brushing and flossing, bacteria often are left behind.”

The General Dentistry study found that using a germ-killing mouthrinse twice a day, in addition to regular brushing, can significantly reduce the occurrence of plaque, as well as gingivitis—the beginning stage of gum disease.

The…

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Oleda Baker on Dental Care – Guest Post

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As you can see from her photos, Senior Supermodel Oleda Baker is aging magnificently. I interviewed Oleda in December. She is a treasure trove of information on everything this blog stands for, namely healthy living and healthy aging, so I asked her if she would share some of her ideas with us. She has written 10 books on beauty and health. Her latest, written at the age of 75, Breaking the Age Barrier – Great Looks and Health at Every Age – was released in November 2010 and is available from Amazon or from her website www.oleda.com where she also sells her own line of health and beauty aids.

What Have 43 percent of American Adults Lost—That They Hated To Lose—Over Which They Had Complete Control—And That Was VERY Preventable?

The answer is their Teeth! Yes, it’s true, 43 percent of Americans have lost some or even all of their teeth by the time they’ve reached age 45. And, what a shame that is, because our teeth are really designed to last a lifetime, although that won’t happen automatically, without our own personal effort.

There’s nothing like a beautiful smile to impress people we meet or make us feel good about ourselves. And there’s no replacing a set of healthy teeth for chewing food or even speaking properly.

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Dental cavities are declining in the U.S. because of fluoridation programs and better tooth care products.

Tooth loss is usually caused by the condition of the gums, known as periodontal disease, which is the loss of connective tissue and bone that support the teeth. It starts before you can see it, usually from improper care.
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Filed under dental plaque, flossing