Tag Archives: cancer risk

Body Weight and Heart Health – Tufts

Eat less; move more; live longer remains the mantra of this blog. Following is a super discussion of the relationship between body weight and heart health from Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter.

Human Heart

Excess body weight increases risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), as well as type 2 diabetes, certain cancers, and many other illnesses. However, not everyone who is overweight or obese develops these illnesses; and simply having a “normal” body weight or body mass index (BMI)-a measure of body weight relative to height-is no guarantee of low risk. “The relationship between BMI and risk for CVD and death is complex,” says Edward Saltzman, MD, academic dean for education at Tufts’ Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. “Elevated BMI does increase CVD risk, but risk is also impacted by things like body-fat percentage, waist circumference, age, duration of obesity, race, ethnicity, gender, and other genetic factors,” as well as lifestyle elements such as smoking and level of physical activity. Continue reading

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Filed under BMI, cancer, cholesterol, diabetes, HDL Cholesterol, heart, heart health, Type 2 diabetes

Exercise May Lower Cancer Risk, Improve Outcomes – NIH

Eat less; move more; live longer. Where have I heard that before? Nice to see the National Institutes of Health adding this aspect of positive results from exercise.

Exercise can work wonders for your health, including strengthening muscles and bones, and boosting metabolism, mood, and memory skills. Now comes word that staying active may also help to lower your odds of developing cancer.

photo of woman using sports equipment

Photo by Ree on Pexels.com

After reviewing the scientific evidence, a panel of experts recently concluded that physical activity is associated with reduced risks for seven common types of cancer: colon, breast, kidney, endometrial, bladder, stomach, and esophageal adenocarcinoma. What’s more, the experts found that exercise—both before and after a cancer diagnosis—was linked to improved survival among people with breast, colorectal, or prostate cancers. Continue reading

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Filed under cancer, Exercise, exercise and brain health, exercise benefits

Goji Berry Benefits: 12 Facts About This Healthy Superfood

Goji BerriesYou can eat them raw or soak them in hot water before munching. Others prefer adding goji berries to trail mixes, smoothies or as a garnish on cereals, salads or yogurts. Basically, goji berries can be baked, cooked, steamed, and processed in any way after they are washed.

Must confess my ignorance about these fascinating berries. I  have ordered some from Amazon. Update: They came and I really liked their complex flavor. As Michelin would say, “Worth a detour.”

Caveats from WebMD: “There are herb-drug interactions with goji berries. If you take warfarin (a blood thinner) you should avoid goji berries. Goji berries may also interact with diabetes and blood pressure medicines, so check with your pharmacist about possible interactions.

“If you have pollen allergies you may want to stay away from this fruit. Case reports have linked goji berries consumption with skin photosensitivity, causing a skin rash on exposure to sunlight. They are also naturally rich in oxalate which may be a health issue in kidney problems.”

Tony

Our Better Health

The Huffington Post Canada     By Arti Patel     03/28/2014  

Even though goji berries date back to the early days of Chinese medicine, people (including celebrities like Madonna and Miranda Kerr) can’t seem to stop talking about this tiny scrunched up fruit.

“The sky is the limit when it comes to incorporating goji berries in your diet,” says health and nutrition expert Rosanna Lee based in Toronto.

Considered both a fruit and a herb, goji berries are typically found in Asian and European countries, but sold in bulk or packages across North America. Although they are a bit pricey, Lee says they include a long list of benefits.

“Goji berries are an excellent source of antioxidants,” she says, though she cautions against immediately believing all of the berries’ health claims. Helping to reduce cancer risk and its “fountain of youth” claims, for example, aren’t backed up by…

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Filed under antioxidants, cancer, goji berries