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Survey: The 7 Biggest Diet Trends in 2015

There are tons of blogs out there that dish about healthy eating—and 42 percent of nutrition experts say that that’s where many of us are getting our health info. But many of those experts also say that not all of the blogs are giving out the right info, and there may be even more misinformation out there as the new year progresses. In fact, the majority of the experts surveyed say that there the wrong info found on nonprofessional websites may be more likely to lead to confusion. The upshot: When in doubt, ask a registered dietitian, who can provide you with the most up-to-date and accurate nutrition information.

Note for the record. This blog is written by a retired financial journalist who is now a health aficionado. I worked for Reuters for 20 years. I always source my posts and, when possible, also include links back to the original item. So, the observation about unprofessional websites does not apply here. 

Tony

 

 

Cooking with Kathy Man

This year’s “What’s Trending in Nutrition” Survey from Pollock Communications and Today’s Dietitian surveyed more than 500 dietitians to see what they think will be the biggest trends in the coming year—and here are a few of them.

1: Seeds and nuts.

54 percent of the surveyed dietitians said that these will be the go-to superfoods in 2015 (even though they acknowledged that kale, Greek yogurt, avocado, and coconut products—like coconut oil—will continue to see an upswing).

2: Anything but beef.

The nutrition experts suggested that fish and seafood, eggs, legumes and nuts, poultry, and dairy are the healthiest, most high-quality proteins (followed by soy). The nutrition pros think red meat is less healthy—most likely due to the saturated fat, cholesterol, and high environmental demands required to produce beef.

3: Going gluten-free.

The vast majority of dietitians think gluten- or wheat-free diets will continue to be a thing in 2015…

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Weight Training Techniques for Seniors

One of my problems with most advice on working with weights is that it is written by young jocks for young jocks. I am a senior citizen and I don’t want to break or tear any parts of my body. If I tried to emulate some of the recommendations or workouts done by you younger guys and gals I think I would end up in the emergency room.

The principles of exercise change for seniors whether it is cardio or resistance work. I have written about seniors doing endurance sports and also seniors lifting weights.

Dr. Anthony Goodman, in the course I took called Lifelong Health, said that seniors should concentrate on using lower weights, but do higher reps because seniors want to strengthen their ligaments and tendons as well as the muscles. Ligaments and tendons weaken as we age and lead to injuries that can really slow you down. Strengthening ligaments can also protect you from common aging problems like Achilles tendon rupture, rotator cuff tears in the shoulder and hip and knee injuries.

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Having said that, I am very pleased to pass on the bottom quarter of a recommendation from Dr. Doug McGuff as reported by Dr. Mercola on his fitness website in January of 2012. Although over a year old, it was news, welcome news, to me. I hope it will be to you, too. Sometimes old news is good news.

Dr. McGuff is explaining super-slow weight lifting. As you will see in his conclusion it is especially helpful for seniors.

Essentially, by aggressively working your muscle to fatigue, you’re stimulating the muscular adaptation that will improve the metabolic capability of the muscle and cause it to grow. McGuff recommends using four or five basic compound movements for your exercise set. These exercises can be done using either free weights or machines. The benefit of using a quality machine is that it will allow you to focus your mind on the effort, as opposed on the movement, because the movement is restricted by the structure of the machine.

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Filed under aging, endurance sports, seniors, Weight, weight-bearing exercise, weight-training