Category Archives: rheumatoid arthritis

Green Tea for St. Patrick’s Day… and Every Day

One Regular Guy Writing about Food, Exercise and Living Past 100

If this looks familiar it’s because I ran it last year on St. Patty’s Day.

gif-st-patrick-188.gif“BETTER to be deprived of food for three days, than tea for one.”
Ancient Chinese proverb.


If that really is an ancient Chinese proverb it must be referring to green tea. Don’t know about green tea? You are in for a treat.

About.com reports that in 1994 the Journal of the National Cancer Institute had a study showing that green tea drinking cut the risk of esophageal cancer in Chinese men and women by nearly 60%.

Nadine Taylor wrote an entire book on it – Green Tea: The natural secret to a healthy life.gif-st-patrick-192.gif

Green tea, beautiful benefits

HealthMad lists 10- benefits of green tea.

1 Used to treat Multiple sclerosis
2 Cancer treat/prevent
3 Stop Alzheimer’s/Parkinson’s
4 Raises metabolism and increases fat oxidation
5 Reduces risk of heart diseases and attacks by cutting…

View original post 257 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under caffeine, cancer, green tea, rheumatoid arthritis

Some tips on arthritis – Tufts

Approximately 350 million people worldwide have arthritis. Nearly 40 million persons in the United States are affected by arthritis, including over a quarter million children! More than 21 million Americans have osteoarthritis. Approximately 2.1 million Americans suffer from rheumatoid arthritis.
Screen Shot 2019-02-26 at 9.28.54 AM.png

I have written more than once about the arthritis I suffer from in my hands. Mine is osteoarthritis.  Following is a series of tips from Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter.

Nonsurgical options for osteoarthritis:

Physical therapy: A therapist can work with you to develop a stretching and strengthening routine to relive symptoms and keep you active.
-Weight loss: If you are overweight, shedding some pounds reduces the pressure you place on your knee joints.
-Walking: For those with milder arthritis, regular brisk walking or even light jogging has been shown in some studies to slow the progression of osteoarthritis.
-Acupuncture: Studies on acupuncture for joint pain are mixed, but some doctors think it’s worth a try for a few months.
-Supplements: Research is mixed on whether glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate and other purported “joint support” supplements relieve pain, with the data trending toward no benefit. But some people feel the pills make a difference.

Here is a breakdown on the two types from the National Institutes of Health.

Osteoarthritis: a disease that damages the slippery tissue that covers the ends of bones in a joint. This allows bones to rub together. The rubbing causes pain, swelling, and loss of motion of the joint. Over time, the joint may lose its normal shape. The condition can cause bone spurs to grow on the edges of the joint. Bits of bone or cartilage can break off and float inside the joint space, which causes more pain and damage. Unlike some other forms of arthritis, osteoarthritis affects only joints and not internal organs. It is the most common type of arthritis.

Rheumatoid Arthritis: a disease that affects your joints. Joints are where two or more bones join together, such as at your knees, hips, or shoulders. Rheumatoid arthritis causes pain, swelling and stiffness. If joints on one side of your body have rheumatoid arthritis, usually those joints on the other side do, too. This disease often occurs in more than one joint. It can affect any joint in the body. If you have rheumatoid arthritis, you also may feel sick and tired, and sometimes get fevers.

Leave a comment

Filed under arthritis, Exercise, exercise benefits, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis

Is There An Anti-Arthritis Diet? – Tufts

As an arthritis sufferer, hands, anything that might suggest relief from the pain piques my interest.

black and white bones hand x ray

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

This is from the Tufts Health and Nutrition Update:

The short answer is “We don’t know,” but some studies have linked dietary factors to increased risk of aching joints. For example, some observational research suggests that higher intake of saturated fat, relative to unsaturated fats, is associated with progression of osteoarthritis. Conversely, higher intake of unsaturated fat was linked to less progression.

An author of one of those studies, Jeff Driban PhD, associate professor in the division of rheumatology at Tufts University School of Medicine, says it’s still an open question whether eating specific foods can counter osteoarthritis.

“There have not been any new findings recently,” Driban says, “but it’s true that key advice for osteoarthritis is maintaining a healthy body weight and being physically active.” Driban notes that a 5% to 10% weight loss can produce a significant improvement in osteoarthritis symptoms.

As for rheumatoid arthritis, research is extensive and ongoing to determine if dietary factors can alleviate the condition, which causes pain, disability and disfigured joints. Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory condition, so foods or diets with anti-inflammatory properties, hypothetically, could have benefits.

“While there is no specific ‘diet’ that people with rheumatoid arthritis should follow, researchers have identified certain foods that may help control inflammation,” says Alicia Romano, MS, RD, LDN, Registered Dietitian, Frances Stern Nutrition Center, Tufts Medical Center. “Many of them are found in the Mediterranean diet pattern, which emphasizes fish, vegetables and olive oil.”

When googling for advice on “anti-arthritis” diets, watch out for claims that seem too good to be true, because they probably are. They include not eating nightshade vegetables, like tomatoes, eggplants and peppers; avoiding acidic foods or beverages; drinking cider vinegar (which is acidic, by the way); and avoiding dairy foods.

Instead of relying on pseudoscience, talk to your primary care doctor or arthritis specialist. Driban, vice chair of the Osteoarthritis Action Alliance, says you can find plain-language advice on weight loss and exercise for osteoarthritis here.

2 Comments

Filed under arthritis, hand arthritis, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis

Some rheumatoid arthritis cells respond to Vitamin D – MNT

I have written numerous times about the arthritis problems in my thumbs. I suffer from osteoarthritis.This is the most common for of arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis, however, is also a painful, if less common, affliction. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis. On the other hand, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is recognized as the most crippling or disabling type of arthritis.

After studying immune cells taken from the joints of people with rheumatoid arthritis, scientists have found that once the disease sets in, some types of cell lose their sensitivity to vitamin D, according to Medical News Today.

482e7a15d5a02a2a78ed71cec0e145e7.gif

The team — which comprised researchers from University College London and the University of Birmingham, both in the United Kingdom — reports the new findings in the Journal of Autoimmunity.

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease that arises because the immune system attacks healthy tissue — usually the joints — by mistake, leading to painful inflammation and swelling.

The disease often affects several joints at the same time, such as the knees, hands, and wrists. It inflames the lining of the joint and eventually damages the joint itself. This can lead to long-lasting pain, problems with balance, and deformity.

Estimates suggest that approximately 1 percent of the world’s population has rheumatoid arthritis, including around 1.3 million adults in the United States. It affects women more often than men, raising the question of whether hormonal factors may be involved.
Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under osteoarthritis, osteoarthritis pain, rheumatoid arthritis, Vitamin D

Managing arthritis in the hands – MNT

I have mentioned ‘personal posts’ previously. Well, arthritis pains in the hands are something I live with daily. It doesn’t get more personal than this. For the past 15 years. I have had trouble buttoning shirts, jackets, etc. I drop keys and other small objects regularly. Any activity that involves manipulating fingers and thumbs causes pain to me in a greater of lesser degree. I thought this rundown on managing arthritis in the hands by Medical News Today was very thorough. I hope this subject is never more than academic for you.

13_hand.jpg

This kind of simple activity can be difficult if you have arthritis of the hands.

Many bones in the body, including those of the wrists and hands, are protected by cartilage. Cartilage can wear down over time. As a result, a person can experience a condition known as osteoarthritis.

Another name for this type of arthritis is “wear and tear” arthritis. The most common causes of osteoarthritis include age, repetitive joint movement, trauma, and sex. Genetics can also play a factor in the development of osteoarthritis.

Arthritis in the hands may also be caused by rheumatoid arthritis or post-traumatic arthritis.

Fast facts on arthritis in hands:

Women are more likely than men to experience osteoarthritis.
There is no cure for any type of arthritis in hands.
Treatment focuses on relieving the pain and managing the underlying condition.
In rare instances, a doctor may recommend surgery to repair a severely damaged finger joint.

What types of arthritis affect the hands?

Both osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can affect the hands.

While osteoarthritis is due to degenerative changes in cartilage, RA is the result of an autoimmune condition.

RA occurs when the body’s immune system attacks healthy tissue that protects the joints. The resulting symptoms can be similar to those of osteoarthritis, including pain, inflammation, and redness.

RA can occur with no risk factors. However, women are more likely to experience the condition than men. Those with a family history of RA, who are obese, or who smoke are also at a greater risk of developing it.

While a person can experience RA at any age, the most common age of onset is between 40 and 60.

A person can also experience post-traumatic arthritis in the hands. This occurs after a person has damaged their hands, such as in a sport-related injury or accident.

Broken or sprained fingers or wrists can also cause post-traumatic arthritis. Injuries can accelerate the breakdown of protective cartilage as well as cause inflammation. Continue reading

8 Comments

Filed under aging, arthritis, hand arthritis, osteoarthritis, osteoarthritis pain, rheumatoid arthritis, successful aging

Exercise can ease arthritis pain – Harvard

We don’t need excuses to blow off exercising. It’s too hot/too cold, I’m too tired/too sore, you name it. When you have a chronic condition like rheumatoid or osteoarthritis, you have a built in excuse for not exercising. It might hurt.

As the Harvard Health Publication says, “Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can cause pain and stiffness that makes moving the last thing you want to do.

“But staying active is important. Not only is it beneficial for your general health — it’s also a way to strengthen your joints, improve your range of motion, and give you the opportunity to take part in the activities you enjoy.

funny_skeleton

“For people with RA, it’s best to take a cautious and strategic approach when starting an exercise program. An individualized program — ideally developed with the help of a physical therapist — can help you protect vulnerable joints while strengthening surrounding muscles. A well-rounded exercise program should include each of these elements: Continue reading

3 Comments

Filed under arthritis, Exercise, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis

Oleda Baker on Arthritis and Alcohol – Guest Post

Click on this to see full size

Click on this to see full size

As you can see from her photos, Senior Supermodel Oleda Baker is aging magnificently. I interviewed Oleda in December. She is a treasure trove of information on everything this blog stands for, namely healthy living and healthy aging, so I asked her if she would share some of her ideas with us. She has written 10 books on beauty and health. Her latest, written at the age of 75, Breaking the Age Barrier – Great Looks and Health at Every Age – was released in November 2010 and is available from Amazon or from her website www.oleda.com where she also sells her own line of health and beauty aids.

A while back a major Scandinavian study showed that consumption of moderate amounts of alcohol reduced the incidence of rheumatoid arthritis by 50%. That might be true, But, don’t misinterpret those results. Drinking can only help prevent the development of Rheumatoid arthritis; it works just the opposite if you already have the disease.

So, if you already have rheumatoid arthritis, don’t drink alcohol.

Alcohol interferes with the effectiveness of arthritis medications, making your pain worse. 

Rheumatoid arthritis is an inflammatory condition. According to the Annals of Epidemiology, chronic, excessive alcohol increases inflammation in your body.

Medications are essential to cope with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. But, taking lots of drugs can damage your liver. Excessive alcohol inflames the liver and affects how it functions.
arthritis3-1
Too many drinks put you at risk for hypertension, heart disease and stroke. Rheumatoid arthritis is also a risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke, according to the American College of Rheumatology.

Alcohol causes weight gain. Health professionals often recommend shedding pounds to help improve rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Some 30 million people suffer from arthritis; most of them have osteoarthritis. Continue reading

Leave a comment

Filed under aging, arthritis, heart, heart problems, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, sleep, stroke, Weight