Category Archives: ideal weight

Is your child fat?

As you can see from this post, lifelong good health starts early. There are excellent tools here to make sure your children get off to the right start.

Tony

IS YOUR CHILD FAT? Here’s a question a growing segment of our PARENTAL population is going to have to begin asking themselves. The need to face REALITY is NOT based on aesthetics but rather the diseases and traumatic life altering compromises our children face if we continue to avoid this topic. The argument, “we should […]

via IS YOUR CHILD FAT? — All About Healthy Choices

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Filed under BMI, children, ideal weight, overweight, Uncategorized, Weight, weight control

Weight loss facts that work

Since eating temptations abound around Valentine’s Day, I thought I would share these observations on weight.

“…. There are facts about obesity of which we may be reasonably certain — facts that are useful today,” says researcher Krista Casazza, PhD, RD, from the department of nutrition sciences at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, in a prepared statement, WebMD reported.

Here they are:

1. “Your genes are not your destiny. Moderate environmental changes can promote as much weight loss as even the best weight-loss drugs.”

I love this one. So often people use ‘bad genes’ as an excuse for their weight problems, ignoring completely their own bad eating habits.

2.”Even without weight loss, physical activity improves health.”

Another winner. I have reiterated this statement in at least 25 different posts on this blog. Eat less; move more; live longer.

UNCLE-SAM-EXERCISE
3. “Physical activity or exercise in the right amounts does help people lose weight.”

Amen. Listen to Uncle Sam.

4. “Continuation of conditions that promote weight loss helps people keep the weight off. Think of obesity as a chronic condition.”

Likewise, I think of good eating and exercise habits as chronic, too.

5. “For overweight children, involving the family and home environment in weight-loss efforts is ideal.”

6. “Providing actual meals or meal replacements works better for weight loss than does general advice about food choices.”

Both 5 and 6 sound like first rate advice.

7. “Weight-loss drugs can help some people lose weight.”

I am not going to argue with the experts here, but I sincerely doubt that the weight stays off if they don’t change their eating and exercise habits. I repeat my recommendation to pay attention to what you eat and exercise regularly. That will melt the pounds away. You won’t need drugs.

8. “Bariatric surgery can help achieve long-term weight loss in some people.”

The study was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health. Our tax dollars at work.

I would like to say for the record that I don’t believe losing weight works. It is only temporary at best. If, instead, you get your head on straight and aim to live a healthy life by eating intelligently and exercising regularly, I can promise that you will never have a weight problem.

Tony

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Filed under ideal weight, Weight, weight control, weight loss, weight loss drugs

What is My Ideal Weight?

As we are in the throes of the holiday season, you may have been asking yourself that question lately. If so, you have come to the right place.

When starting writing this blog nearly seven years ago, I weighed 165 pounds. At 5’9″ tall, I was happy at that weight. It was the lowest I had been in the previous 20 years. At my worst, I weighed around 225 lbs. You can read about that in – How I Lost 50 Pounds in 52 Weeks.

Since starting the blog, I have become very aware of my consumption of food each day as well as my actions to burn off excess calories and to provide necessary exercise for my body. It is a fact that I have focused on my own health more since starting the blog than at any time in my life. As a soon to be 77-year old who has buried both parents as well as several other aged loved ones, I am very much aware of my own mortality and would like to forestall it as long as possible. I also have a 22-year old daughter whom I would like to see grow up.

Getting back to my ideal weight, because of my focus on good health, I have adopted healthy habits on the positive side and avoid negative ones. So, today, nearly seven years after starting this blog, I find myself weighing 150 pounds. Because I weigh myself every day, I am not surprised at that, but, considering that I thought I was at my ideal weight at 165 , I am a bit surprised. So, what should I weigh? One of the factors contributing to the complexity of this question is the testimony of the senses. What we see looking out at our fellow humans is a skewed population which has 60 percent overweight and 30 percent obese. You need to keep that in mind when thinking about your own weight.

Although I stand 5’9″ tall, I have a small frame. My wrist measures less than 7 inches around.

I found what I consider to be a really helpful web page on the subject and will share it with you here. It was created by Dr. Steven B. Halls in 2008.

According to this page, the average weight that other people of my age, height, weight and gender would describe as their ideal weight is 152 pounds.

The medical recommendation is a range of 129 to 169 pounds. This recommendation is based on a Body Mass Index (BMI) range of 19-25. My current BMI is 21.9. Just for the record, I don’t like BMI as a weight metric. You can check out my post Don’t Get Hung up on Your BMI if you want more info on it.

Other results, based on possibly out of date criteria, the weight look up tables of the Metropolitan Life Insurance company in 1979, offer 144 to 154 pounds. The Met Life tables show values that are too large for short people and wrong for tall folks and have no age modifiers.

So, even though I find myself nearly 20 pounds below what I thought was my idea weight back when we started writing the blog, I am actually right in the correct range.

If you are looking at this because it is near year end and you are thinking about ‘getting healthy’ in the coming year, this is a good starting point. Best of luck.

You can read some very useful guidelines on my Page How to Lose Weight (and Keep it Off) Page.

Tony

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Filed under aging, Exercise, exercise and brain health, exercise benefits, ideal weight, Weight

What is Your Ideal Body Weight?

What do you weigh? What should you weigh? In a manner of speaking, that is the starting point for this blog, yet answers from authoritative sources vary widely. Which one to use? It’s up to you, but an informed decision is better than a blind one.

Most folks Google ‘ideal weight‘ and punch in their height and weight to get the answer. Yet most ideal body weight websites use obsolete formulas or tables created in 1979 or earlier, according to Stephen B Halls MD.

Weigh-Scale

Dr. Halls offers “Peoples Choice” ideal weight. That is, the average weight that other people of your age, height, weight and gender describe as their ideal weight. He points out that women tend to imagine their ideal weight as unrealistically low, so they diet too much. Men tend to allow their weight to be higher than medically recommended. Maybe we guys are acting a little macho there. Punch your numbers into his calculator at the link and see for yourself.

His medical recommendation is based on your Body Mass Index (BMI). Medical evidence suggests that all body weight in the BMI range of 19 to 25 are reasonably equally healthy for your height.

He offers the Metropolitan Life tables which were created for the Metropolitan Life Insurance company in 1979 although he doesn’t recommend it. He notes that the Met Life tables are very prevalent on the web. Yet, the values are too large for short people and wrong for tall people. They have no age modifiers and frame size is hard to understand.

In addition, Dr. Halls offers several other Ideal body weight formulas widely used with explanations.

I think the good doctor has provided a real public service here. Check it out.

Tony

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Filed under ideal weight, Uncategorized

What is Your Ideal Body Weight?

What do you weigh? What should you weigh? In a manner of speaking, that is the starting point for this blog, yet answers from authoritative sources vary widely. Which one to use? It’s up to you, but an informed decision is better than a blind one.

Most folks Google ‘ideal weight‘ and punch in their height and weight to get the answer. Yet most ideal body weight websites use obsolete formulas or tables created in 1979 or earlier, according to Stephen B Halls MD.

Weigh-Scale

Dr. Halls offers “Peoples Choice” ideal weight. That is, the average weight that other people of your age, height, weight and gender describe as their ideal weight. He points out that women tend to imagine their ideal weight as unrealistically low, so they diet too much. Men tend to allow their weight to be higher than medically recommended. Maybe we guys are acting a little macho there. Punch your numbers into his calculator at the link and see for yourself.

His medical recommendation is based on your Body Mass Index (BMI). Medical evidence suggests that all body weight in the BMI range of 19 to 25 are reasonably equally healthy for your height.

He offers the Metropolitan Life tables which were created for the Metropolitan Life Insurance company in 1979 although he doesn’t recommend it. He notes that the Met Life tables are very prevalent on the web. Yet, the values are too large for short people and wrong for tall people. They have no age modifiers and frame size is hard to understand.

In addition, Dr. Halls offers several other Ideal body weight formulas widely used with explanations.

I think the good doctor has provided a real public service here. Check it out.

Tony

 

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Why Do We Eat, and Why Do We Gain Weight?

No cue is unchangeable. Altering the environment in which you live and work, Lowe suggests—shopping for less-energy-dense foods, putting the Doritos out of reach on the top shelf, changing your commute so that you don’t drive by the doughnut shop—can go a long way toward changing the patterns of hunger that have become ingrained in your routine.

Cooking with Kathy Man

Maria Konnikova wrote in The New Yorker …..

Here are a few of the things that can make you hungry: seeing, smelling, reading, or even thinking about food. Hearing music that reminds you of a good meal. Walking by a place where you once ate something good. Even after you’ve just had a hearty lunch, imagining something delicious can make you salivate. Being genuinely hungry, on the other hand—in the sense of physiologically needing food—matters little. It’s enough to walk by a doughnut shop to start wanting a doughnut. Studies show that rats that have eaten a lot are just as eager to eat chocolate cereal as hungry rats are to eat laboratory chow. Humans don’t seem all that different. More often than not, we eat because we want to eat—not because we need to. Recent studies show that our physical level of hunger, in fact, does not correlate strongly…

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Filed under ideal weight, Snacking, Weight, weight control

Your Heart May Be Older Than You Are

Heart Age, a free Web-based tool owned by consumer-goods maker Unilever, ULVR.LN -0.97% combines various risk factors, such as body weight, cholesterol and smoking habits, to estimate a biological age for the heart. The result is framed relative to a person’s chronological age. The researchers on the Spanish study, published in the February issue of the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, aren’t affiliated with Unilever.

Cooking with Kathy Man

We all know we should eat healthier, exercise more and sometimes take medicines to stave off heart disease. Some researchers think putting an age on our hearts will do a better job of motivating us to do all that.

In a recent study involving 3,000 patients, researchers in Spain compared a relatively new tool to measure heart-disease risk, called Heart Age, against a commonly used risk-assessment tool. Participants who were told their heart age was greater than their chronological age showed bigger health improvements a year later than those in the comparison group. Both groups were healthier after a year than a control group that received conventional advice about nutrition and exercise.

A checkup at the doctor, of course, may alert patients when blood pressure and cholesterol levels, among other risk factors, are too high. And a number of statistical tools let patients know when they are at moderate-to-high risk…

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When you eat as important as what you eat … Study

Fascinating study…

Cooking with Kathy Man

Most weight-loss plans center around a balance between caloric intake and energy expenditure. However, new research has shed light on a new factor that is necessary to shed pounds: timing. Researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH), in collaboration with the University of Murcia and Tufts University, have found that it’s not simply what you eat, but also when you eat, that may help with weight-loss regulation. The study will be published on January 29, 2013 in the International Journal of Obesity.

“This is the first large-scale prospective study to demonstrate that the timing of meals predicts weight-loss effectiveness,” said Frank Scheer, PhD, MSc, director of the Medical Chronobiology Program and associate neuroscientist at BWH, assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, and senior author on this study. “Our results indicate that late eaters displayed a slower weight-loss rate and lost significantly less weight than early eaters, suggesting that…

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Filed under eating, eating out, ideal weight, meal timing, normal weight gain, Weight, weight control

What is My Ideal Weight?

If you have been asking yourself that question lately, you have come to the right place.

When starting writing this blog nearly two years ago, I weighed 165 pounds. At 5’9″ tall, I was happy at that weight. It was the lowest I had been in the past 20 years. At my worst, I weighed around 225 lbs. You can read about that in my post How I Lost 50 Pounds in 52 Weeks.

Since starting the blog, I have become very aware of my consumption of food each day as well as my actions to burn off excess calories and to provide necessary exercise for my body. It is a fair statement that I have focused on my own health more since starting the blog than at any time in my life. As a senior citizen who has buried both parents as well as several other aged loved ones, I am very much aware of my own mortality and would like to forestall it as long as possible. I also have a teenaged daughter whom I would like to see grow up.

Getting back to my ideal weight, because of my focus on good health, I have adopted healthy habits on the positive side and avoid negative ones. So, today, nearly six years after starting this blog, I find myself weighing 150 pounds. Because I weigh myself every day, I am not surprised at that, but, considering that I thought I was at my ideal weight at 165 nearly two years ago, I am a bit surprised. So, what should I weigh? One of the factors contributing to the  complexity of this question is the testimony of the senses. What we see looking out at our fellow humans is a skewed population which has 60 percent overweight and 30 percent obese. You need to keep that in mind when thinking about your own weight.

Although I stand 5’9″ tall, I have a small frame. My wrist measures less than 7 inches around.

I found what I consider to be a really helpful web page on the subject and will share it with you here. It was created by Dr. Steven B. Halls in 2008.

According to this page, the average weight that other people of my age, height, weight and gender would describe as their ideal weight is 152 pounds.

The medical recommendation is a range of 129 to 169 pounds. This recommendation is based on a Body Mass Index (BMI) range of 19-25. My current BMI is 21.9. Just for the record, I don’t like BMI as a weight metric. You can check out my post Don’t Get Hung up on Your BMI if you want more info  on it.

Other results, based on possibly out of date criteria, the weight look up tables of the Metropolitan Life Insurance company in 1979, offer 144 to 154 pounds. The Met Life tables show values that are too large for short people and wrong for tall folks and have no age modifiers.

So, even though I find myself nearly 20 pounds below what I thought was my idea weight back when we started writing the blog, I am actually right in the correct range.

If you are looking at this because it is near year end and you are thinking about ‘getting healthy’ in the coming year, this is a good starting point. Best of luck.

You can read some very useful guidelines on my Page How to Lose Weight (and Keep it Off) Page.

Tony

2 Comments

Filed under ideal weight, Weight

What is Your Ideal Body Weight?

What do you weigh? What should you weigh? In a manner of speaking, that is the starting point for this blog, yet answers from authoritative sources vary widely. Which one to use? It’s up to you, but an informed decision is better than a blind one.

Most folks Google ‘ideal weight‘ and punch in their height and weight to get the answer. Yet most ideal body weight websites use obsolete formulas or tables created in 1979 or earlier, according to Stephen B Halls MD.

Weigh-Scale

Dr. Halls offers “Peoples Choice” ideal weight. That is, the average weight that other people of your age, height, weight and gender describe as their ideal weight. He points out that women tend to imagine their ideal weight as unrealistically low, so they diet too much. Men tend to allow their weight to be higher than medically recommended. Maybe we guys are acting a little macho there. Punch your numbers into his calculator at the link and see for yourself.

His medical recommendation is based on your Body Mass Index (BMI). Medical evidence suggests that all body weight in the BMI range of 19 to 25 are reasonably equally healthy for your height.

He offers the Metropolitan Life tables which were created for the Metropolitan Life Insurance company in 1979 although he doesn’t recommend it. He notes that the Met Life tables are very prevalent on the web. Yet, the values are too large for short people and wrong for tall people. They have no age modifiers and frame size is hard to understand.

In addition, Dr. Halls offers several other Ideal body weight formulas widely used with explanations.

I think the good doctor has provided a real public service here. Check it out.

Tony

Leave a comment

Filed under ideal weight, life challenges, men's health, weighing, Weight