Category Archives: core exercises

Sore muscles after exercise – MNT

Lots of folks are experiencing new beginnings right now as the new year commences. Exercise programs are high on the list of resolutions, particularly after some festive over indulgence in the past month. Medical News Today offered the following explanation of that pain you have in your freshly exercised muscles.

Whether you are cramming in some last-minute exercise before the holidays or trying a new workout, beware of aching muscles. But why does your body feel so sore, and what can you do to speed up recovery?

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Have you decided to make a start on your New Year’s resolution and take up exercise now? Or maybe you’re looking at stepping up your usual routine as a result of the inevitable excesses of the holidays? The chances are that your muscles will pay the price.

Starting within a day of your exercise session, your muscles begin to seize up, and you feel more and more uncomfortable. For the next couple of days, you move like a robot, find it hard to dress yourself, and the simple act of walking down a set of stairs will see you groaning in agony.

Whether you have recently taken up exercise or simply pushed your limits, you may well be familiar with this sequence of events. Continue reading

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Filed under cardio exercise, core exercises, Exercise, exercise benefits, exercise duration, New Year Resolutions, sore muscles

Crawling has excellent physical benefits

I am now in my seventh year of writing this blog and I pretty much learn something new every day about living a healthy life because I read about the subject constantly. Nonetheless, I was amazed to learn that crawling is a serious form of exercise with excellent benefits to both the body and brain.

I have written repeatedly that walking is the Cinderella of the exercise world in that its physical benefits are almost totally unappreciated. I’m not sure what to call crawling, that’s right, the same thing that babies do before they are able to walk. I was not even aware that crawling was in the exercise world. I was ignorant.

 

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The Health Science Journal says, “Crawling is an important functional milestone as it strengthens the muscles and connective tissues in and around the hands, wrists, elbows, shoulders, spine and hips. Furthermore, this weight-bearing quadruped motion also helps to stretch the hand ligaments, facilitating the development of the arches. Crawling also opens up the saddle joint at the base of the thumb – essential for being able to perform fine motor skills like holding cutlery, pens and pencils.

“In adulthood, the increasing prevalence of sedentary lifestyles results in many of the deep stabilizing muscles becoming weak and ineffective at performing their functional role. Muscles and connective tissues weaken, posture changes and instability, dysfunction, tightness and pain usually follow, particularly during physical exertion.

“This is why crawling exercises are as effective in adults as they are in infants and can help restore the optimal musculoskeletal health that has occurred as a result of a sustained period of inactivity.”(my emphasis)

This is from The Breaking Muscle website, “Yes, crawling, a seemingly childish and foolish “exercise,” could be the one thing that improves your health, your strength, your mobility, and your performance in any athletic area. It could even improve your ability to think, focus, and reason.

“Crawling is a developmental movement pattern that ties everything about you together. In developing children, crawling activates and integrates the different parts of the brain. Through crawling, neural connections and pathways are established in the brain that allow the brain to become more efficient at communication between the left and right hemispheres. The better the brain can communicate and process information, the better the body moves.1 Crawling also unites your sensory systems. It integrates your vestibular system (your balance system), your proprioceptive system (your sense of self in space, or your self awareness system), and your visual system (your visual system). It can even improve your hand eye coordination.”

Here is a You Tube video on it:

I don’t know about you, but I am going to start crawling today.

Tony

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Filed under aging, aging brain, balance training, core exercises, crawling, Exercise, exercise benefits, muscle building, muscles

How Do I Benefit From Core Exercises? – Harvard

We hear a lot about ‘working the core’ these days. Pilates and yoga are ones that I remember, but how do I benefit from core exercises?

Harvard Medical School offers the following in answer: “Who will notice first? That golf partner who can no longer beat your drives off the tee? The co-worker who wishes that she had as much energy as you at the end of the day? Or will it be the friend who, with more than slight envy, congratulates you on looking so “fit?”

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“The fact is, after beginning a core exercise program, you will notice the difference. You will have greater strength and flexibility for doing everyday tasks. You will have added power for athletic activities. You’ll have less pain and stiffness. And your slimmer waistline and better defined ab muscles will be hard to ignore.

“Core muscles form the central link between your upper and lower body. A strong core underpins almost everything you do. Building up core muscles is key to improving performance in almost any sport by extending your range of motion to lift, bend, turn and reach. It also trims your silhouette and tones your abs and glutes.

Core Exercises is a Special Health Report prepared by Harvard Medical School physicians and Master Trainers. It will show you how you can strengthen your core with workouts that take no more than 20-40 minutes and do not require fancy equipment. They are exercises that will keep you motivated and continue to challenge you as you make progress.

“Six of the workouts consist of 9-10 exercises each that combine classic core moves — planks, squats, and lunges — with exercises that work the full range of core muscles. Each exercise is illustrated and accompanied by tips and techniques, instructions for tempo and movement, and options for making the exercise easier or taking it up a notch.

“The report also gives you four short workouts for busy days or when you need a change. You’ll get tips for exercising safely and effectively. Plus, a handy chart tells you which exercises and stretches are best for your favorite sport.”

Tony

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Filed under core exercises, Exercise, Harvard