My Ticket to Ride …

I am thrilled to report that today marks the 22nd anniversary of my retirement. On October 2 of 2000, I bade the financial world adieu and started my life as a guy who didn’t have to get up for work every morning.
I got my first job at the age of 10 sweeping the floor of a dry cleaner and continued to work till I reached 60. Although my degree is in Finance, I went into the publishing world writing and editing. I liked markets, but always knew I would write. I wrote and practiced journalism for most of my career, spending 20 years working for Reuters covering international markets and then teaching journalism at the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University for several years. Because I had written about markets for 30 years, my boss at the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation asked me if I would like to manage some money So, I managed $900 million in bond investments for the final five years of my working life.

No mas. I thought I would celebrate with this biking post. When I was working I used to tell my friends at the office that when I retired I was going to ride my bike on the Chicago lakefront every day. They thought that was funny. I was never more serious.
You all know how I ride my bike nearly every day year ’round here in Chicago. I do it because I love it. Period. Everything else is gravy. As you know from my numerous posts on exercise and the brain I absolutely believe that my riding aids in my still thinking straight at the ripe of age of 82. For the record, my family has five cases of Alzheimer’s on both sides – my father’s father, my father’s sister and her daughter. On my mother’s side, she and her sister.

Tony

25 Comments

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25 responses to “My Ticket to Ride …

  1. Congratulations Tony! I retired in 2001. And I have walked nearly every day since. A couple of hurricanes messed up my good intentions. Let’s hope we both keep up the good work and keep Alzheimer’s far far away!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. By the way, how is it going with the pup? I can’t remember whether I recommended Eileen Anderson’s blog to you. I think she is an excellent behaviorist and trainer.

    Liked by 2 people

    • So far so good. I have learned a lot from Boots. The first thing he taught me was that while I knew a lot about Gabi who had been my dog for the best part of 17 years, I did not necessarily know a lot about dogs in general. Boots is a very different little guy. We are both learning every day. I am embarassed to say that I never got over to Eileen’s blog, but will definitely check it out. I know I have a lot to learn. Thanks again for the recommendation.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I finally got over there and have read a few posts. You are right, she is great! I am now a follower. Thanks very much for the help.

      Liked by 1 person

      • I’m glad you like her blog. I have read books by many different trainers over the years, and for me her explanations are the best. She also wrote a book about taking care of senior dogs with dementia. It was a huge help to me caring for my 16-year-old golden retriever in her final years. Eileen had so many good tips on how to deal with senior dogs. And also she has a very great blog post about how to handle fireworks. My previous dog Molly, was extremely phobic of both fireworks and thunder.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, thanks again. She clearly knows her stuff.

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  3. I am so glad you created your health column! I enjoy reading it every day and am seeking a healthier life for myself and family. I used to say I would live to be 100. Today I just just aim at staying as healthy and active as I can be. I join into activities with my adult children and 5-year-old granddaughter and that keeps me moving! I love your column and look forward to reading it every day! Thanks for writing it, Tony!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you so much for sharing that. That is exactly why I write this stuff. I feel like I have found a really worthwhile way of living that is simple, but not necessarily easy. Best of luck!

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Joe

    Thanks for an inspiring article.Funny @ age 81 I just came in from a ride and saw this article. So true! I was a couch potato until about age 37. Started jogging at about age 37. Jogged into my ,60s.now I cycle a few times per week. Not alot but enough for a good workout. Will continue …it makes a big difference…both my father and brother died of dementia. Age 70, and 85. Must keep moving…..Joe S

    Liked by 1 person

    • Indeed, there is no silver bullet against Alzheimer’s, but I believe exercise is a serious defense. At least, I am staking my future on it. Exercise is not optional. BTW, I read that over 80, the body doesn’t process protein as well as in youth, so I have reduced my riding to below 20 miles per day. Otherwise I have to nap. Also, I am walking my dog three times a day, about a mile each time. Walking is superb exercise. Keep up the good work!

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  5. Tony, there’s a very interesting section on the brain published in the latest issue of The Economist magazine. Do you want me to scan the document and forward it by email to you?

    Liked by 1 person

  6. garrystafford

    Congrats Tony, way to keep up the bike riding. Please know that you’ve been an inspiration to me. I just retired last year and I’ve been riding my bike more. In fact, this week I’m moving to a more bike friendly area of town. More paths, mtn biking and road biking. That day is not today! Right on. Ride on. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks very much, Garry. Nice to hear from you. Very happy that anything I have written may have helped you in your retirement and facing aging. Glad you could find a bike friendly area. That means so much. I am so lucky to live where I do and can ride every day. Ride on!

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  7. Keep on spinning! I’m a few years behind but following in your footsteps by keeping moving in retirement. Thanks for continuing to inspire all of us!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. A life well lived! Congratulations, Tony, and many more years of the same!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Tony, I have now scanned the document on the brain and I think it is best sent to you via email as it is quite a long document. So can you email me, to paulhandover(at) pm (dot) com

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