Up to 80% of athletes who die suddenly had no symptoms or family history of heart disease – ESC

“Genetic testing for potentially lethal variants is more accessible than ever before and this document focuses on which athletes should be tested and when,” said author Dr. Michael Papadakis of St George’s, University of London, UK. “Sportspeople should be counselled on the potential outcomes prior to genetic testing since it could mean exclusion or restricted play,” The European Society of Cardiology (ESC) reported.

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In most cases, clinical evaluation will dictate the need for preventive therapy such as a defibrillator and the advice on exercise and participation in competitive sports. Dr. Papadakis explained: “Even if a genetic abnormality is found, recommendations on treatment and return to play usually depend on how severe the disease is clinically. Is it causing symptoms such as fainting? Is the heart excessively weak or thick? Can we see many irregularities of the heart rhythm (arrhythmias) and do they get worse during exercise? If the answer is ‘yes’ to any of these questions then play is likely to be curtailed in some way.”

2 Comments

Filed under endurance sports, heart disease, stress

2 responses to “Up to 80% of athletes who die suddenly had no symptoms or family history of heart disease – ESC

  1. Thanks for your posts, Tony! They are always interesting and informative. If you have any good news about Type 1 diabetes, please pass it on. Thanks again!

    Liked by 2 people

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