Top 5 snacking myths – Tufts

I confess: I am a snacker. When I had my weight problem: weight over 220 pounds and 44 inch waist, snacking was one of the reasons. But, it doesn’t have to be that way. Tufts Health & Nutrition Letter agrees.

People in the U.S. are snacking more than ever before. According to a 2019 survey, 59 percent of adults worldwide prefer snacking to eating regular meals, and that figure jumps to 70 percent for young people. We have a lot of misconceptions about this increasingly common activity that can have an outsized impact on our health. Let’s take a look at five common myths:

Photo by SplitShire on Pexels.com

Myth 1: Snacking is healthy (or unhealthy)

Snacking in and of itself is neither healthy nor unhealthy. A snack is, technically, any food eaten between meals. Unhealthy foods are clearly…well…unhealthy, but even healthy foods can cause unhealthy weight gain if they lead to excess calorie intake. If you are hungry between meals, choose low calorie foods, so you don’t end up eating more calories than your body needs in a day. The fact is, very few well-designed studies have looked at the impact of eating frequency on health, so we have little evidence to support either health benefits or detriments to snacking versus sticking to three meals per day.

Although trends indicate people are looking for healthier snack options, much of what they are getting is junk food in misleading packaging. Market research shows a rising demand for organic and plant-based foods, and products without additives. Organic potato chips, rice crackers, and even some cookies and candy bars meet all three of those criteria, but they are not necessarily good choices. Refined grains (like white flour and rice flour), added sugars (including concentrated fruit juice, honey, agave nectar, and “raw” sugar), and saturated fats (including butter and coconut oil) are associated with health problems even if they are organic, “natural,” vegan, gluten-free, or any other “health-halo” label food manufacturers put on the package.

3 Comments

Filed under Uncategorized

3 responses to “Top 5 snacking myths – Tufts

  1. Have you found new research that has turned you off of coconut oil? I’m still using it and am wondering if it is no longer considered healthy because of the saturated fat level…

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am using MCT oil which is coconut oil but with a twist. It goes directly to the liver and you get energy immediately from it. Check it out. But, you can’t cook with it. Still use coconut oil for that.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Not sure I need energy! Trying to ditch the Christmas poundage once again – an annual exercise. Glad to hear I can still use coconut oil – I use it for my veggie stir-fry in the morning every day. Hubby was giving me grief about it. Not that he is any judge. He uses butter like it is the only food left on earth worth eating. But I will have a look at MCT oil – thanks for the tip!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s