Fermented-food diet increases microbiome diversity and lowers inflammation – Study

Stanford researchers discover that a 10-week diet high in fermented foods boosts microbiome diversity and improves immune responses.

A diet rich in fermented foods enhances the diversity of gut microbes and decreases molecular signs of inflammation, according to researchers at the Stanford School of Medicine.

Photo by Geraud pfeiffer on Pexels.com

In a clinical trial, 36 healthy adults were randomly assigned to a 10-week diet that included either fermented or high-fiber foods. The two diets resulted in different effects on the gut microbiome and the immune system.

Eating foods such as yogurt, kefir, fermented cottage cheese, kimchi and other fermented vegetables, vegetable brine drinks, and kombucha tea led to an increase in overall microbial diversity, with stronger effects from larger servings. “This is a stunning finding,” said Justin Sonnenburg, PhD, an associate professor of microbiology and immunology. “It provides one of the first examples of how a simple change in diet can reproducibly remodel the microbiota across a cohort of healthy adults.”

In addition, four types of immune cells showed less activation in the fermented-food group. The levels of 19 inflammatory proteins measured in blood samples also decreased. One of these proteins, interleukin 6, has been linked to conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, Type 2 diabetes and chronic stress.

1 Comment

Filed under fermented foods, high fiber foods, microbe diversity

One response to “Fermented-food diet increases microbiome diversity and lowers inflammation – Study

  1. Wonder how that works if one is on a no-dairy diet, as we are.

    Liked by 1 person

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