How to avoid running overuse injuries

The ubiquitous overuse injuries that nag runners may stem from an unlikely culprit: how far you lean forward.

Trunk flexion, the angle at which a runner bends forward from the hip, can range wildly–runners have self-reported angles of approximately -2 degrees to upward of 25. A new study from the University of Colorado Denver (CU Denver) found that greater trunk flexion has significant impact on stride length, joint movements, and ground reaction forces. How you lean may be one of the contributors to your knee pain, medial tibial stress syndrome, or back pain.

Photo by Savvas Stavrinos on Pexels.com

“This was a pet peeve turned into a study,” said Anna Warrener, PhD, lead author and assistant professor of anthropology at CU Denver. Warrener worked on the initial research during her postdoc fellowship with Daniel Liberman, PhD, in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. “When [Lieberman] was out preparing for his marathons, he noticed other people leaning too far forward as they ran, which had so many implications for their lower limbs. Our study was built to find out what they were.”

2 Comments

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2 responses to “How to avoid running overuse injuries

  1. Ciecka, Jim

    Tony,
    I learned today that veterinarian Dr. B left Burnham Park Animal Hospital. I could not get any information about where he went or whether he still is practicing. I’m wondering whether you had any information about him. He was the primary (almost exclusive) vet taking care of my dog. I would like to continue with him if he is the Chicago area and working.
    Jim
    312 5059418
    jciecka@depaul.edu

    James E. Ciecka
    Professor of Economics, DePaul University
    Co-Executive Editor, Journal of Forensic Economics

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Jim. I used Burnham Park for the 16 years I had Gabi, but never got the same vet. Have you tried asking Burnham Park where he went. That seems a reasonable request.

      Like

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