Aerobic Exercise Helps Cognitive Function in Older Adults – Study

“Preaching to the choir” – was my first reaction to this study, having published lots of posts on this very subject.

Increasing evidence shows that physical activity and exercise training may delay or prevent the onset of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In aging humans, aerobic exercise training increases gray and white matter volume, enhances blood flow, and improves memory function. The ability to measure the effects of exercise on systemic biomarkers associated with risk for AD and relating them to key metabolomic alterations may further prevention, monitoring, and treatment efforts. However, systemic biomarkers that can measure exercise effects on brain function and that link to relevant metabolic responses are lacking.

To address this issue, Henriette van Praag, Ph.D., from Florida Atlantic University’s Schmidt College of Medicine and Brain Institute and Ozioma Okonkwo, Ph.D., Wisconsin Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and Department of Medicine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and their collaborators, tested the hypotheses that three specific biomarkers, which are implicated in learning and memory, would increase in older adults following exercise training and correlate with cognition and metabolomics markers of brain health. They examined myokine Cathepsin B (CTSB), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and klotho, as well as metabolomics, which have become increasingly utilized to understand biochemical pathways that may be affected by AD.

2 Comments

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2 responses to “Aerobic Exercise Helps Cognitive Function in Older Adults – Study

  1. Yet more good new about exercise and the brain! I’ve heard about bdnf elsewhere, it’s been called “miracle-gro” for the brain 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks for commenting. Yes, eat less; move more; live longer. – and keep you brain function intact at the same time. I really enjoy reading about how beneficial exercise is for the entire body, and especially for the brain.

    Liked by 1 person

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