Lack of exercise damages us – WHO Report

Eat less; move more; live longer. The World Health Organization agrees. Following are the potential results of inadequate exercise for all age groups, according to the WHO.

– Insufficient physical activity is one of the leading risk factors for death worldwide.
– Insufficient physical activity is a key risk factor for noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes.
– Physical activity has significant health benefits and contributes to prevent NCDs.
– Globally, 1 in 4 adults is not active enough.
– More than 80% of the world’s adolescent population is insufficiently physically active.
– Policies to address insufficient physical activity are operational in 56% of WHO Member States.

WHO Member States have agreed to reduce insufficient physical activity by 10% by 2025.

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What is physical activity?

WHO defines physical activity as any bodily movement produced by skeletal muscles that requires energy expenditure – including activities undertaken while working, playing, carrying out household chores, travelling, and engaging in recreational pursuits.

The term “physical activity” should not be confused with “exercise”, which is a subcategory of physical activity that is planned, structured, repetitive, and aims to improve or maintain one or more components of physical fitness. Beyond exercise, any other physical activity that is done during leisure time, for transport to get to and from places, or as part of a person’s work, has a health benefit. Further, both moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity improve health.

How much of physical activity is recommended?

WHO recommends:

Children and adolescents aged 5-17years

Should do at least 60 minutes of moderate to vigorous-intensity physical activity daily.
Physical activity of amounts greater than 60 minutes daily will provide additional health benefits.
Should include activities that strengthen muscle and bone, at least 3 times per week.

Adults aged 18–64 years

Should do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity throughout the week, or do at least 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity throughout the week, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity.
For additional health benefits, adults should increase their moderate-intensity physical activity to 300 minutes per week, or equivalent.
Muscle-strengthening activities should be done involving major muscle groups on 2 or more days a week.

Adults aged 65 years and above

Should do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity throughout the week, or at least 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity physical activity throughout the week, or an equivalent combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity activity.
For additional health benefits, they should increase moderate-intensity physical activity to 300 minutes per week, or equivalent.
Those with poor mobility should perform physical activity to enhance balance and prevent falls, 3 or more days per week.
Muscle-strengthening activities should be done involving major muscle groups, 2 or more days a week.

The intensity of different forms of physical activity varies between people. In order to be beneficial for cardiorespiratory health, all activity should be performed in bouts of at least 10 minutes duration.

Levels of insufficient physical activity

Globally, around 23% of adults aged 18 and over were not active enough in 2010 (men 20% and women 27%). In high-income countries, 26% of men and 35% of women were insufficiently physically active, as compared to 12% of men and 24% of women in low-income countries. Low or decreasing physical activity levels often correspond with a high or rising gross national product. The drop in physical activity is partly due to inaction during leisure time and sedentary behaviour on the job and at home. Likewise, an increase in the use of “passive” modes of transportation also contributes to insufficient physical activity.

Globally, 81% of adolescents aged 11-17 years were insufficiently physically active in 2010. Adolescent girls were less active than adolescent boys, with 84% vs. 78% not meeting WHO recommendations.

Several environmental factors which are linked to urbanization can discourage people from becoming more active, such as:

fear of violence and crime in outdoor areas
high-density traffic
low air quality, pollution
lack of parks, sidewalks and sports/recreation facilities.

How to increase physical activity?

Countries and communities must take action to provide individuals with more opportunities to be active, in order to increase physical activity.

Policies to increase physical activity aim to ensure that:

in cooperation with relevant sectors physical activity is promoted through activities of daily living;
walking, cycling and other forms of active transportation are accessible and safe for all;
labour and workplace policies encourage physical activity;
schools have safe spaces and facilities for students to spend their free time actively;
quality physical education supports children to develop behaviour patterns that will keep them physically active throughout their lives; and
sports and recreation facilities provide opportunities for everyone to do sports.

Policies and plans to address physical inactivity have been developed in about 80% of WHO Member States, though these were operational in only 56% of the countries in 2013. National and local authorities are also adopting policies in a range of sectors to promote and facilitate physical activity.

5 Comments

Filed under cancer, diabetes, Exercise, exercise and brain health, exercise benefits, longevity

5 responses to “Lack of exercise damages us – WHO Report

  1. Tony, while I think there’s no doubt people need to move more, where the WHO places the responsibility to encourage this behavior makes me nervous. You would never assume that a US president, as a matter of policy, would purposely hold the economy back but we had that, not three years ago. When one of the new candidates said he could deliver a 100% increase in economic activity, he was chastised. The chatting class said the promise was virtually criminal. Two years later it’s 4.2%, 1.2% greater than that 100% improvement.

    I don’t want ANYONE involved in that economic debacle from just a few years ago telling me how I should live my life. Know what i mean?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Don’t you think children should exercise A LOT more than 60 minutes minimum per week? Remember that playing outside is also exercise.

    Liked by 1 person

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