Smoking linked to higher dementia risk – Study

I feel very strongly about smoking. This is one of those Captain Obvious things to me. It astounds me that anyone who can read will continue to smoke.

The following is excerpted from my Page – How many ways does smoking harm you? Check it out for chapter and verse on the multi-faceted damage that smoking does to your body.

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Tobacco use is the single largest cause of preventable cause of death in the United States.

On average people who smoke die about 10 years sooner than non-smokers. The New England Journal of Medicine.

Smoking triples the risk for cataracts and is also a risk factor for macular degeneration and its response to treatment. Dr. Nicholas Volpe, Tarry Professor and Chairman Department of Opthalmology Feinberg School of Medicine Northwestern University

The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2014 about 224,000 new cases of lung cancer and 159,260 cancer deaths caused by tobacco use. The overall survival rate for those with lung cancer, sadly, remains at around 15%. You have less than one chance in six of surviving.

Neuroscience news reported the following: Summary: Those who quit smoking, or who have never lit up, have a 19% decreased risk of developing dementia than continual smokers, a new study reports.

In an Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology analysis of nationwide health claims from Korea, men who smoked had an elevated risk of dementia.

Compared with continual smokers, long-term quitters and never smokers had 14% and 19% lower risks for dementia, respectively. Never smokers had an 18% decreased risk of Alzheimer’s disease compared with continual smokers. Also, long-term quitters and never smokers had 32% and 29% decreased risks of vascular dementia compared with continual smokers.

The study included 46,140 men aged 60 years or older from a Korean health screening program in 2002 to 2013.

“Smoking cessation was clearly linked with a reduced dementia risk in the long term, indicating that smokers should be encouraged to quit in order to benefit from this decreased risk,” said senior author Dr. Sang Min Park, of Seoul National University, in Korea.

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Filed under aging brain, brain, brain damage, dementia, impact of quitting smoking, smoking, Smoking dangers

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