Organ meats – Benefits and risks – MNT

Organ meats are sometimes referred to as “offal.” The word offal derives from the term “off fall,” referring to any part of an animal that falls away when it is butchered, such as the tail, feet, and testicles.

In the United States, organ meats include all things that are distinguished as offal. On the other hand, most meats Americans are used to eating are muscle meats, while organ meats are not considered a staple of the Western diet.

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Organ meats carry some risks, however, as well as benefits, when they are consumed, despite their nutritional value.

Fast facts on organ meats:

  • Organ meats are very high in some vitamins and nutrients.
  • There are issues with harmful bacteria in intestines if not cleaned properly. Also, brain meat has been known to transmit rare diseases, such as Mad Cow Disease.
  • Despite the vitamin content, culturally in the U.S., organ meats are not considered as important a part of a dietary plan, as traditional muscle meats.

What is organ meat?

Chicken liver is a type of organ meat or offal.

There are several different types of organ meats, some of which are better known than others including:

          • liver
          • heart
          • kidneys
          • sweetbreads
          • brain
          • tongue
          • tripe
          •  

        Organ meats are sometimes referred to as “super foods” because they are dense sources of vitamins and nutrients, including:

        Across the world, many different cultures like to use an animal in its entirety for food, including making use of the blood, bones, and organs.

        In the natural world, predatory animals are known to value the organs of their prey and, for example, to eat the liver first because it is so densely packed with nutrients.

      Benefits of eating organ meats

      Here is a breakdown of some of the most common organ meats and their benefits:

      Liver

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Filed under minerals, offal, organ meats, vitamins

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