Negative Social Interactions Increase Hypertension Risk In Older Adults

“There is a body of evidence in social psychology research suggesting that women care more about and pay more attention to the quality of their relationships,” said Sneed, a Ph.D. candidate in psychology. “Our findings suggest that women are particularly sensitive to negative interactions, which is consistent with this previous work.”

Cooking with Kathy Man

Keeping your friends close and your enemies closer may not be the best advice if you are 50 or older.

New research from Carnegie Mellon University’s Rodlescia Sneed and Sheldon Cohen shows that unpleasant or demanding interpersonal encounters increase hypertension risk among older adults.

Published in the American Psychological Association’s Health Psychology Journal, the study provides some of the first concrete evidence that negative social interactions not only influence psychological well-being but also physical health — in this case, blood pressure levels. Hypertension affects an estimated 65 million Americans and is a major contributor to cardiovascular disease, the leading cause of death in the U.S.

“This demonstrates how important social networks are as we age — constructing strong, positive relationships are beneficial to prolonged health,” said Cohen, the Robert E. Doherty University Professor of Psychology in the Dietrich College of Humanities and Social Sciences.

For the study, Sneed and…

View original post 251 more words

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s