Biceps Tendonitis Causes and Treatment Options

Biceps tendonitis is a common condition seen by chiropractors, and your practitioner will want to make a thorough examination of you and your medical history in order to determine whether your condition is tendonitis or some other condition, and if there are any co-occurring injuries. X-rays are rarely used initially, but may be called for later if the shoulder is not responding to treatment.

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??????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????The aches and pains of biceps tendonitis can seriously interfere with your daily activities. It is often surprising to people to realize just how much they use their biceps in the course of a day, whether they’re picking up a bag of groceries or just brushing their teeth.

The biceps brachii muscle originates on the scapula (shoulder blade) and crosses both the shoulder and elbow joints, eventually attaching to the upper forearm. Its main function is the flexion and supination (twisting the palm to the front) of the forearm, but it also helps lift the shoulder. Weight trainers will be very familiar with the bicep curl, in which the muscle is strengthened through repeated lifting of a weight in the hand through alternately flexing and extending at the elbow.

Repeated overuse of the biceps muscle can lead to inflammation of the tendon, causing tendonitis. People who practice sports…

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1 Comment

Filed under chiropractors, Exercise, Uncategorized

One response to “Biceps Tendonitis Causes and Treatment Options

  1. Cure of tendon injuries is essentially practical. Using non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications coupled with Physical Therapy, rest, orthotics or braces, and moderate return to workout is a common therapy. An acronym used to list the remedial treatments in fixing tendinitis is Rice: Rest, Ice, Compress, and Elevate. Resting assists in the prevention of further injury to the tendon. Ice is effective at soothing pain, restricting too much swelling, and stimulating blood circulation after the fact. Compression and elevation both perform similarly to ice in their ability to restrict excessive, unnecessary inflammation. Initial recovery is commonly within 2 to 3 days and full recuperation is within 4 to 6 week.

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