The Facts on Heart Disease – Mayo Clinic Book

First of all, what is ‘heart disease?’

Here’s what the Mayo Clinic website says: “Heart disease is a broad term used to describe a range of diseases that affect your heart. The various diseases that fall under the umbrella of heart disease include diseases of your blood vessels, such as coronary artery disease; heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias); heart infections; and heart defects you’re born with (congenital heart defects).

“The term “heart disease” is often used interchangeably with “cardiovascular disease.” Cardiovascular disease generally refers to conditions that involve narrowed or blocked blood vessels that can lead to a heart attack, chest pain (angina) or stroke. Other heart conditions, such as infections and conditions that affect your heart’s muscle, valves or beating rhythm, also are considered forms of heart disease.

“Many forms of heart disease can be prevented or treated with healthy lifestyle choices.”

We told you about the Mayo Clinic’s new Book Healthy Heart for Life on July 17. Following is an excerpt from an early chapter.

* Heart disease is the nation’s number one killer. Some 80 million Americans have some form of heart disease – that’s about one in three adults.

* Every year 2 million Americans have a heart attack of stroke.

* Every day 2,200 Americans die of heart disease – an average of one death every 39 seconds.

* Heart disease kills more people each year than all forms of cancer combined.

* Heart disease kills nearly five times as many women as does breast cancer.

* About one-third of Americans who die each year of heart disease are under the age of 75. It’s not just an old person’s disease.

* Health care costs and lost economic productivity due to heart disease and stroke cost Americans an estimated $444 billion in 2010.

You can order your copy from Mayo Clinic Healthy Heart for Life

Tony

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Filed under aging, blood pressure, cholesterol, Exercise, heart, relaxation, stress, Weight

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